Inclusion Matters: Considering Identity, Intersectionality,

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KELLY P. BOUTIN, M.Ed. . . BRYANT UNIVERSITY . kboutin1@bryant.edu. @. kelly_boutin. ANNIE . M. KOSAR, M.S. . UNIVERSITY . OF RHODE . ISLAND. anniem@mail.uri.edu. @. annie_kosar. Continuing Education Session . ID: 484052 Download Presentation

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Inclusion Matters: Considering Identity, Intersectionality,




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Presentations text content in Inclusion Matters: Considering Identity, Intersectionality,

Slide1

Inclusion Matters: Considering Identity, Intersectionality, & Borderlands for Student Success

Slide2

KELLY P. BOUTIN, M.Ed. BRYANT UNIVERSITY kboutin1@bryant.edu@kelly_boutinANNIE M. KOSAR, M.S. UNIVERSITY OF RHODE ISLANDanniem@mail.uri.edu@annie_kosar

Slide3

Continuing Education Session

Slide4

Inclusion

What does it mean to you?

Slide5

Student Development Theory: A Progression

Our students aren’t the only ones developing…

Slide6

Identity as a Whole

Slide7

Singular Social Group Memberships

Sexual Orientation

Gender Expression

Ability

Race

Ethnicity

Spirituality

Socioeconomic Status

Age

Gender Identity

SELF

Slide8

Student Development Theory

In the past 15 years, research on identity evolved to be more inclusive, nuanced, and interdisciplinary in its

approach

(Torres

, Jones, &

Renn

,

2009).

Although many scholars

have returned to considering

"the whole student"

rather than just pieces of identity, the work

around

singular social group memberships

of

the

70’s

-90's is still important and

relevant.

Without

the understanding of how an individual's specific social group

membership

develops, it would be hard to understand how that development has impacted the individual's development as a

whole

(Boutin, 2015).

Slide9

Multiple Identity Development

Pope And Reynolds, (1991

)

Dealt with the complexities of

diversity.

Specifically

exploring multiple oppressions

Dialogue

concerning the complexity of developing multiple identities, some which may be oppressed

&

others

privileged.

Extended

Root

s

(1990)

Biracial Identity Model

to create

Multidimensional Identity Model

(MIM):

Identify with one aspect of self (society assigned-passive acceptance)

Identify with one aspect of self (conscious identification)

Identify with multiple aspects of self in a segmented fashion

Identify with combine aspects of self (identity intersection)

Slide10

Multiple Identity Development

Jones and McEwen, (2000)

Conceptual Model of Multiple Dimensions Of Identity

At

the center of multiple dimensions of identity is a core sense of self, or

core

identity.”

Externally defined

singular social group memberships surround

the core

Contextual influences are represented by intersecting circles of

identity Importance of each secular identity is represented by a dot on the model.

How

far these dots/identity dimensions are from the core identity

signifies the

importance

that

identity dimension has

for the

individual at that

time.

Slide11

Multiple Identity Development

(Jones

and McEwen,

2000

)

Slide12

Multiple Identity Development

Abes

and Jones, (2004)

Explored

Meaning

-Making Capacity

and the dynamics of lesbian college students

multiple dimensions of identity

However, given the complexity associated with negotiating sometimes conflicting identity dimensions, the salience of which interacts with contextual influences, a more holistic perspective on lesbian identity construction considers not only its interaction with other dimensions of identity, but also its interaction with other domains of development” (

Abes

and Jones, 2004).

Slide13

Multiple Identity Development

Stevens, (2004) spoke about students becoming empowered through integrating identities.

The men in this study needed to have a sense of empowerment before they could truly explore how their sexual orientation intersected with other dimensions of their

identity … Exploring

how their sexual orientation intersected with these other dimensions of identity had only occurred after the students self-identified as gay and they felt empowerment within that segment of their identity

.

(Stevens, 2004)

Slide14

Multiple Identity Development

Abes

, Jones, and McEwen, (2007)

Reconceptualized

the

Model of Multiple Dimensions of Identity

along with the role of

Meaning-Making Capacit

y in the construction of

Multiple

Identities

P

ortrays

in

2 dimensions

the interactive nature of the relationships among

3 components

of the identity construction process: context, meaning-making, and identity

perceptions

(

Abes

, Jones, McEwen,

2007).

The Meaning

-Making

C

apacity

is drawn in the new model as a filter

&

contextual influences move through the filter depending upon the depth &

permeability of the

filter.

(

Abes

, Jones, McEwen, 2007

)

Slide15

Multiple Identity Development

(

Abes

, Jones, McEwen, 2007).

Slide16

Multiple Identity Development

Abes

and

Kasch

, (2007)

P

roposed

the idea of examining

Queer Theory

in relation to

M

ultiple Identity Development

which moved us closer to the theory of

I

ntersectionality

.

Slide17

Self-Authorship

Kegan

(1982)

first offered

the means to integrate separate clusters of developmental theory into a holistic framework.

Self

-authorship

-

a self

-perceived understandings of

self

Moving from simple & external constructions of self to more complex & internal ones

(

Abes

et al., 2007 & Jones, 2009

)

Intrapersonal

Who am I?

Interpersonal

How do I construct relationships with others?

Cognitive

How do I know what I know

?

(

Baxter-

Magolda

,

2001)

Slide18

Intersectionality

Intersectionality expands the analytic lens to include

both

multiple identities and larger social structures of power

& inequality

(Torres,

Jones,

&

Renn

,

2009

).

Intersectionality involves not only understanding our multiple identities, but also examines many of the systems of privilege and oppression which operate in our society and affect how identity can be very different from one person to another even if they may hold the same identity(

ies

)

.

Intersectionality is best situated as an interpretive framework that blends four others: critical theory, feminist theory, queer theory, and postmodern perspectives. At its core, intersectionality derives its purpose from the idea of creating social change for the participants and society in general.” (Russell, 2012)

Slide19

Intersectionality

Russell, 2012

Slide20

Border Identities

Borderland

- a third space that is neither one land nor the other but a new space that is a “both/and”

location…An

environment where individuals fluctuate between two discrete worlds, participating in both and wholly belonging to neither, “none of them ‘home,’ yet none of them ‘not home’”

(

Anzaldúa

, 1987, p. 528).

Theoretical

borderlands

can effectively describe diverse college students’ complex understandings and experiences with their identities

(

Abes

, 2009

).

Slide21

LA MESTIZA

Because I, a

mestiza

, c

ontinually walk out of one culture and into another, because I am in all cultures at the same time,

alma entre dos

mundos

,

tres

,

cuatro

, me

zumba

la

cabeza

con lo

contradictorio

.

Estoy

norteada

por

todas

la

voces

que

me

hablan

simultáneamente

.

Anzaldúa

, 1987

Slide22

Border Identities

YOU TELL US!

Slide23

Application

“As

scholars continue to ask

questions about

the nature and development of identity in college students, those questions must reflect the complexity of identity and its development as well as the growing demographic diversity within the college student

population”

(Stewart, 2009, p. 253).

Slide24

Sexual Orientation

Gender Expression

Ability

Race

Ethnicity

Spirituality

Socioeconomic Status

Age

Gender Identity

SELF

Boutin and

Kosar

, 2015

Slide25

Inclusion

What does it mean to you?

What are you going to do about it?

Slide26

References

Abes

, E.S

.

(

2009). Theoretical Borderlands: Using Multiple Theoretical

Perspectives

to Challenge Inequitable Power Structures in Student

Development

Theory.

Journal of College Student

Development, 50

(2), 141-156

.

Abes

, E.S., Jones, S.R

.

(2004). Meaning-making capacity and the dynamics

of

lesbian college students’ multiple dimensions of identity.

Journal

of

College Student Development, 45

(6), 612-630

.

Abes

, E.S., Jones, S.R., McEwen, M.K

.

(2007).

Reconceptualizing

the model

of

multiple dimensions of identity: the role of meaning-making

capacity

in the construction of multiple identities.

Journal of

College

Student Development, 48

(1), 1-22

.

Abes

, E. S. &

Kasch

, D., (2007). Using queer theory to explore lesbian college

students

’ multiple dimensions of identity.

Journal of College Student

Development

, 48

(6), 619-636.

Slide27

References

Anzaldúa

, G. (1987).

Borderlands: La

Frontera

.

San Francisco: Spinsters.

Baxter

Magolda

, M. B

.

(2001).

Making their own way: Narratives for transforming

higher

education to promote self-development,

Herndon:

Stylus.

Jones, S.R., McEwen, M.K. (2000). A conceptual model of multiple dimensions of

Identity

.

Journal of College Student Development, 41

(4), 405-414

.

Jones, S. R. (2009). Constructing identities at the intersections: An

authoethnographic

exploration of multiple dimensions of identity.

Journal of College Student Development, 50

(3), 287-304.

Kegan

, R

.

(1982).

The evolving self: Problem and process in human development.

Cambridge

: Harvard University Press.

Slide28

References

Pope, R. L., Reynolds, A.L.(1991). The complexities of diversity: exploring multiple oppressions.

Journal of Counseling and Development, 70

, 174-180.

Root

, M. P. P., (1990). Resolving “other” status: Identity development of

biracial

individuals.

Women and Therapy, 9

(1-2), 185-205.

Russell

, E. A. (2011)

Voices unheard: Using intersectionality to understand

identity

among sexually marginalized undergraduate college students of

color

(Doctoral dissertation). Retrieved from

https

://etd.ohiolink.edu/rws_etd/document/get/bgsu1333141044/inline

Stevens, R.A., (2004). Understanding gay identity development within the

college

environment.

Journal of College Student Development, 45

(2),

185

-206

.

Slide29

References

Torres

, V., Jones, S. R., &

Renn

, K. A. (2009). Identity development theories in

Student

Affairs: Origins, current status, and new approaches.

Journal

of College

Student Development, 50

(6), 577-596.

Slide30

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Slide35

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Slide37

Slide38


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