Smoking & Smoking Cessation

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Presented by. :. The Point of this Presentation. To learn about the effects of smoking so that you can make a more educated decision if an opportunity comes for you to start smoking.. To learn about resources for people trying to quit smoking.. ID: 483319 Download Presentation

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Smoking & Smoking Cessation




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Slide1

Smoking & Smoking Cessation

Presented by:

Slide2

The Point of this Presentation

To learn about the effects of smoking so that you can make a more educated decision if an opportunity comes for you to start smoking.

To learn about resources for people trying to quit smoking.

Slide3

QUIZTIME!

1. Is tobacco smoking responsible for: a. 1/5 deaths? b. 1/10 deaths? c. 1/25 deaths? d. 1/100 deaths?

ANSWER: it is estimated that tobacco smoking causes the death of

1 in

5

adults

worldwide

Slide4

QUIZTIME!

2. Smoking increases the risk of developing: a. lung cancer b. heart disease c. stroke d. emphysema e. cancer of the mouth f. all of the above

ANSWER:

f. all of the above

Slide5

QUIZTIME!

3. True or false:A single cigarette can contain over 4000 chemicals.

ANSWER:

true

; cigarettes contain over 4000 chemicals, 60 of which are known carcinogens (cancer-causing agents)

Slide6

4. How does cigarette smoking affect skin?a. makes you look youngerb. premature agingc. dry skind. all of the above

ANSWER: b. premature aging; cigarettes cause skin to stain and darken and cause premature wrinkling

QUIZTIME!

Slide7

5. Smoking is responsible for what percentage of all lung cancer?a. 20%b. 50%c. 90%d. 99%e. It is not proven that smoking causes lung cancer.

ANSWER: c. 90%

QUIZTIME!

Slide8

6. True or false: If a mother smokes during her pregnancy, her child is more likely to smoke as a teenager.

ANSWER: true; even if the mother quits smoking after the baby is born, the child has already developed more nicotine receptors in the brain

QUIZTIME!

Slide9

7. True or false: Smoking is the single largest preventable cause of death and disease in Canada.

ANSWER: true; according to the Alberta Lung Association, smoking is the number one preventable cause of death in Canada

QUIZTIME!

Slide10

8. True or false:The nicotine in smoking cessation products, such as NicoretteÔ or NicodermÔ is less harmful than the nicotine in cigarettes.

ANSWER: false; the benefit of these products is that the amount of nicotine can gradually be reduced, until the person can quit altogether. The other benefit is that these products do not contain the other harmful chemicals found in cigarettes.

QUIZTIME!

Slide11

9. Side effects of nicotine include:a. insomniab. nauseac. dizzinessd. all of the above

ANSWER: d. all of the above. Nicotine can cause all of the side effects listed.

QUIZTIME!

Slide12

10. True or false: Quitting smoking only involves breaking the physical addiction to nicotine.

ANSWER: false. Quitting smoking also involves changing social habits as well as mental addiction.

QUIZTIME!

Slide13

Factoid!

CIGARETTES ARE THE ONLY

LEGAL PRODUCT

THAT

KILLS

UP TO 50% OF THE USERS WHEN USED AS INTENDED BY THE MANUFACTURER!

Slide14

What’s in a Cigarette?

Tobacco leavesFillers (usually “waste” products of tobacco leaves) to give cigarette “bulk”Water“Moisturizers” to enhance shelf life (prevents cigarettes from drying out)

Slide15

What’s in a Cigarette?

-- ADDITIVES

Sugars: make cigarettes easier to inhale

Ammonium: makes cigarettes less acidic

Eugenol/menthol: numb the throat (smoker cannot feel the smoke's aggravating effects)

Cocoa: expands airways; smoke can go deeper into lungs (more nicotine exposure & more tar)

Flavoured cigarettes

Slide16

Slide17

Slide18

What’s in Cigarette Smoke?

Chemical:

Found in:

Acetone

Paint stripper/nail polish remover

Ammonia

Floor cleaner/carpet cleaner

Arsenic

Rat Poison

Butane

Lighter Fuel

Cadmium

Car Batteries

Carbon Monoxide

Car Exhaust

Slide19

Chemical:

Found in:

DDT

Insecticide

Hydrogen Cyanide

Gas Chambers

Methanol

Rocket fuel

Naphthalene

Moth balls

Toluene

Industrial solvent

Vinyl chloride

Plastics

What’s in Cigarette Smoke?

Slide20

remember, over 4000 chemicals are found in cigarette smoke; only some have been listedin every cigarette, there are 60 known carcinogens

What’s in Cigarette Smoke?

Slide21

What’s in Cigarette Smoke?

Types of smoke:1. “sidestream” smoke from the burning tip of the cigarette (2nd hand smoke . . .)2. “mainstream” smoke from the filter or mouth end. 3. the latest...third hand smoke

Slide22

Second Hand Smoke

major cause of stillbirths and Sudden Infant Death Syndrome (SIDS)

associated with asthma and respiratory problems

increases the risk of coronary heart disease

by 25-35%

increases bronchitis, pneumonia, and ear/respiratory tract infections

Slide23

What Does Smoking Do to the Body?

Hair: smells and stains

Eyes: sting & water, blindness, cataracts

Skin: premature wrinkles & aging

Brain: stroke, addiction/withdrawal, anxiety about harm of smoking

Nose: decreases sense of smell

Teeth: stains, plaque, loosens teeth, gum disease

Hands: staining and decreased circulation (cold hands!)

Slide24

Mouth/throat: lip/throat/mouth cancer, sore throat, reduced sense of taste, smelly breathLungs: lung cancer, cough, shortness of breath, colds/flu, pneumonia, emphysemaHeart: blocks/weakens arteries of the heart, heart attackChest: esophagus cancerAbdomen: stomach ulcers, stomach/pancreas/colon Liver, Kidneys, Bladder: cancer

What Does Smoking Do to the Body?

Slide25

Brain after stroke due to smoking

Chronic smoker’s lung

Mouth cancer

Slide26

Wounds: take longer to heal, longer time to recuperate from surgeryBlood: leukemiaLegs/Feet: leg pain and gangreneCan also cause:Diabetes: Non-insulin dependent diabetes mellitus (Type 2, adult-onset)Weakened immune system

What Does Smoking Do to the Body?

Slide27

http://www.who.int/tobacco/en/atlas9.pdf

What Does Smoking Do to the Body?

Slide28

Costs of Smoking - to individuals

1 pack in Canada ~ $10.00/25 cigarettes1 pack/day = $10.00/day x 30 days = $300.00/month x 12 months = $3600/year- If you were making $9.00/hour, that is 400 hours before taxes!- One year of smoking a pack a day costs almost as much as a down-payment on a car!

Slide29

Costs of Smoking - to the economy

6-15% of total annual healthcare expenses are due to smoking$4.4 billion in direct health care costs for tobacco-related illnessesSick days from workLower worker productivityIncreased life insurance premiumsCosts for smoking areas at workLost income from dying young

20% of trash removal due to tobacco products

Slide30

1 000 000 fires started due to cigarette lightersPercentage of deaths by fire due to cigarettes: 10%Total deaths due to fire from cigarettes: 300 000 (global)China 1987: World’s worst forest fire caused by cigarettes (300 killed, 5000 homeless, 1.3 million hectares of land destroyed)

Costs of Smoking

- to the economy

Slide31

Smoking – Opinions of Youth- (Grades 6-12; Canadian Statistics, survey 2008-2009)

84%

of youth believed tobacco was addictive

85%

also believed smoking harmed the health of non-smokers

About

4% of

all non-smokers believe that the most common reason youth start smoking is the

behavior

of peers (“It’s cool”)

18%

of non-smokers believed smoking would help you “stay slim”

Slide32

Youth Smoking Survey-Results Profile 2010/2011

Survey was first conducted in 1994 and has been repeated every 2 years since 2002.

26% of youth from across Canada in grades 6-12 have tried smoking and 3% report smoking on a daily basis.

85% of current smokers started smoking by age 19.

Slide33

Peer and Family Influences

Influences can be direct (peer pressure) but more often indirect (modeling)Non-smokers are most susceptible to start smoking if their friends smoke.Youth with family members who smoke are more likely to start smoking.Younger smokers are more likely to obtain cigarettes from friends and family.

Slide34

Smoking – Becoming Less Popular - (Canadian Statistics, 2012)

The current smoking rate in Canada (12 and older) was 19.9% in 2011 (down from 25.9% in 2001).

The rates for men and women both dropped 6% during this period - men from 28.1% to 22.3% and women from 23.8% to 17.5%.

The smoking rate fell more rapidly among teens (15 to 19 years) than any other age group.

18 to 19 year-olds: decline from 33.2% to 19.8%

15 to 17 year-olds: decline from 19.3% to 10.1%

Slide35

http://www.hc-sc.gc.ca/hc-ps/tobac-tabac/research-recherche/stat/ctums-esutc_2011-eng.php#tabc

Slide36

http://www.hc-sc.gc.ca/hc-ps/tobac-tabac/research-recherche/stat/ctums-esutc_2011-eng.php#tabc

Slide37

http://www.hc-sc.gc.ca/hc-ps/tobac-tabac/research-recherche/stat/ctums-esutc_2011-eng.php#tabc

Slide38

What about Hookah

Also Called:HookahArgeelaNargeelaShishaGozaBong…etc

Originally from

India.

Popular in the Middle

East and

becoming more and more popular in North and South America, Europe and Australia

Slide39

Hookah

How it works: Flavored tobacco is put in a bowl (called a “rass” or “head”), and tin foil with holes covers it. A charcoal heats the head and the smoke is cooled through a water chamber at the bottomThe smoke is then inhaled through a hose and a mouthpiece

Slide40

Concerns with Hookah

Although cigarette use has decreased significantly, alternative forms of tobacco such as hookah are becoming more popular, especially among youth.

In 2010…

- 10%

of Canadians

in grades 9 to 12

reported ever trying Hookah and

4%

use it regularly

.

29

% of Canadians thought smoking hookah was less harmful than smoking cigarettes.

34

% thought

it

contained less

tar.

Slide41

HOOKAH

TRUE OR FALSE?

Smoking hookah is less harmful than smoking cigarettes

Slide42

Hookah Vs. Cigarettes

When compared to smoking cigarettes, hookah smoke produced: 1.7 times more nicotine 8.3 times more carbon monoxide 36 times more tar

Slide43

Cigarette Smokers Vs. Hookah Smokers

What is Carbon Monoxide?A colorless and odorless gas which can decrease the amount of oxygen in your blood. Hemoglobin binds oxygen, but when carbon monoxide is present, you get carboxyhemoglobin!“after a single smoking session found that carboxyhaemoglobin levels increased by more than 400% in hookah smokers compared to less than 40% in cigarette smokers.”

Slide44

The Health Risks

When measuring the 24-hour urinary cotinine level in hookah smokers, they found out it is equivalent to smoking 10 cigarettes a day!

Slide45

The Health Risks

According to the WHO, a typical one-hour session of hookah smoking produces 100 to 200 times the volume of smoke produced by one cigarette

It is still associated with all the diseases we’ve talked about, including:

-All types of cancers

-Heart Disease

-Lung Disease

and more…

Slide46

Also Cost!

How much for one box of hookah tobaco?

Works out to costing more than cigarettes…

Slide47

http://www.offthemark.com/smoke/smoke.htm

Slide48

There is hope!

Slide49

Tips for Quitting

Decide positively that you WANT to quit; avoid negative thoughts.List reasons for wanting to quit.Set a target date for quitting–perhaps a special day such as your birthday.Know quitting isn't easy, but it's not impossible either; withdrawal is temporary!Tell your family and friends that you're quitting; they can give support!

Slide50

Tips for Quitting

Spend as much free time where smoking isn't allowed (e.g. libraries, museums, theatres).Avoid food/beverages that you normally associate with smoking (mental addiction/habit is almost as hard to break as the physical addiction!) .Avoid activities you associate with smoking (e.g. if you normally smoke while watching TV, lay off TV for a while).

Slide51

Ways to Quit:

Switching brands:- switch to a brand you find distasteful- switch to a brand with less tar/nicotine and gradually wean offGradually quitting:- smoke only half of each cigarette- postpone the lighting of a cigarette by 1 hour- change your eating habits to help you cut down (e.g. reach for a glass of juice instead of a cigarette)

Slide52

Other Aids:

nicotine replacement: nicotine gum, inhaler, lozenge or patch; can be used to reduce cravings and withdrawal symptomsprescription medications:e.g. Zyban®, Champix®- nicotine-FREE- can help reduce the urge to smoke and reduce withdrawal symptoms- only recommended for smokers over 18 years of ageother treatments – so many aids!!

Slide53

http://www.glasbergen.com/images/fit49.gif

Slide54

Resources

Smoker’s Help Line

1-866- 33A-ADAC (1-866-332-2322)

Alberta Lung Association

www.ab.lung.ca/smokingandtobacco.html

Canadian Cancer Society "One Step at a Time" Program

:

-

http://66.59.133.166/tobacco/pubs/osaat/indexe.htm

-

Phone: 1-888-939-3333 (toll free)

Smoke-Free Alberta

www.smokefreealberta.com/

So many resources!!

Slide55

The Difficulties of Quitting

withdrawalIt can be HARD WORK!!multiple tries

SUPPORT AND ENCOURAGEMENT!!

Slide56

The Positives of Quitting

money

control in your life; “I have to go for a smoke”; pride

finding a mate – look prettier; healthy = hot

your health – lungs, heart, everything!

 sports, sticky situations, energy, dancing, fun with friends

friends’, others’ health

example for others, children

Slide57

Barb Tarbox: A Life Cut Short by Tobacco

In September 2002

, Barb Tarbox was diagnosed with incurable lung (stage IV) and brain cancer at the age of 41.She smoked for 30 years, totaling a 60 pack-year smoking history.She died May 18, 2003 after speaking to more than 50,000 students about the dangers of smoking.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=YQQXH2gqbtc

Slide58

Any Questions?

Slide59

References

World Health Organization. Tobacco Free Initiative: Retrieved September 18, 2004:

http://www.who.int/tobacco/about/en/

,

http://www.who.int/tobacco/en/atlas9.pdf

,

http://www.who.int/tobacco/en/atlas13.pdf

http://www.ab.lung.ca/

Tobacco Free Kids. (2003, April 3)

Health Harms From Second Hand Smoke

. Retrieved September 18, 2004:

http://tobaccofreekids.org/research/factsheets/pdf/0103.pdf

Health Canada. (2004, September 13)

Summary of Results of the 2002 Youth Smoking

Survey. Retrieved September 18, 2004:

http://www.hc-sc.gc.ca/hecs-sesc/tobacco/research/yss/index.html

Nicorette

. (2004) Retrieved September 18, 2004:

http://nicorette.quit.com/

Nicoderm

. (2004)

Retreived

September 18, 2004:

http://nicodermcq.quit.com/

Zyban

. (2004) Retrieved September 18, 2004:

http://www.zyban.com/zp_1000.html

Canadian Lung Association. (2010)

Smoking and Tobacco

. Retrieved February 12, 2010: http://www.lung.ca/protect-protegez/tobacco-tabagisme/quitting-cesser/benefits-bienfaits_e.php

C Health. (2010)

Smoking

. Retrieved February 12, 2010:

http://chealth.canoe.ca/channel_section_details.asp?text_id=3263&channel_id=2022&relation_id=16495

Slide60

References

WHO Study Group on Tobacco Product Regulation .

Waterpipe

Tobacco Smoking: Health Effects, Research Needs and

Recommended Actions by Regulators. Geneva, Switzerland: World Health Organization, 2005.

Maziak

W. The global epidemic of

waterpipe

smoking.

Addictive Behaviors; 2011: Jan-Feb; 36(1-2):1-5.

Canadian Tobacco Use Monitoring Survey (CTUMS) 2006. Health Canada http://www.hc-sc.gc.ca/hc-ps/tobactabac/

research-

recherche

/stat/_ctums-esutc_2006/ann_summary-sommaire-eng.php.

Youth Smoking Study (YSS) 2006. Health Canada.

Dugas

E, Tremblay M, Low NCP,

Cournoyer

D,

O’Loughlin

J. Water-pipe smoking among North American youth.

Pediatrics 2010; 125:1184-1189.

Cobb C, Ward KD,

Maziak

W,

Shihadeh

AL,

Eissenberg

T.

Waterpipe

tobacco smoking: An emerging health crisis in the United States.

American Journal of Health Behavior 2010; 34(3): 275-285.

Theron

A, Schultz C, Ker JA,

Falzone

N.

Carboxyhaemoglobin

levels in water-pipe and cigarette smokers.

South African

Medical Journal 2010;100: 122-124.

Neergaard

J, Singh P, Job J, Montgomery S.

Waterpipe

smoking and nicotine exposure: A review of the current evidence.

Nicotine and Tobacco Research 2007; 9(10): 987-994.

Akl

EA,

Gaddam

S,

Gunukula

SK,

Honeine

R, et al. The effects of

waterpipe

tobacco smoking on health outcomes: a

systematic review.

International Journal of Epidemiology 2010; 39: 834-857.

Slide61

References

Daher

N,

Saleh

R,

Jaroudi

, E,

Sheheiti

H, et al. Comparison of carcinogen, carbon monoxide, and ultrafine particle

emissions from

narghile

waterpipe

and cigarette smoking:

Sidestream

smoke measurements and assessment of

second-hand smoke emission factors.

Atmospheric Environment 2010; 44: 8-14.

CDC.

Bidi

and Hookah Use Among Canadian Youth: Findings from the 2010 Canadian Youth Smoking Survey: Retrieved August 25, 2013:

http://www.cdc.gov/pcd/issues/2013/12_0290.htm

Propel. Tobacco Use in Canada: Patterns and Trends 2012 Edition: Retrieved August 25, 2013:

http://www.tobaccoreport.ca/2012/TobaccoUseinCanada_2012.pdf

Alberta Health Services. Smoking is Expensive: Retrieved August 25, 2013:

http://www.albertahealthservices.ca/2570.asp

Statistics Canada. Health at a Glance – Current Smoking Trends: Retrieved August 25, 2013:

http://www.statcan.gc.ca/pub/82-624-x/2012001/article/11676-eng.htm

2008-2009 Youth Smoking Survey (YSS) Public Use

Microdata

File: Retrieved August 25, 2013:

http://search2.odesi.ca/documentation/YSS2008-2009/yss08_microdata_publicuse_091202_ver3.pdf

Youth Smoking Survey. Results Profile for Alberta: Retrieved August 25, 2013:

http://www.yss.uwaterloo.ca/results/yss10_EN_Provincial%20Report_Alberta_20120514.pdf

Slide62

Thanks

for

listening!!

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