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Great Weight Debate
Great Weight Debate

Great Weight Debate - PowerPoint Presentation

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A London Conversation on Obesity 2 London has the highest rate of childhood obesity of any peer global city and the highest proportion of obese children in all the regions of England London has a childhood obesity emergency and we need to act fast ID: 541842 Download Presentation

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Presentation on theme: "Great Weight Debate"— Presentation transcript

Slide1

Great Weight Debate

A

London Conversation on ObesitySlide2

2

London has the highest rate of childhood obesity of any peer global city, and the highest proportion of obese children in all the regions of England. London has a childhood obesity emergency and we need to act fast.

Obesity

has a substantial impact on the health of

children – now and in the future.

Estimated treatment cost of overweight children in London will be £36-195m. Obese children are much more likely to be obese adults, where even more serious health consequences occur.

More obese children in London than in New YorkSlide3

Conversation design principles

3

Working in partnership, the Healthy London Partnership and the London councils, Public Health England, London Obesity Leadership Group, CCGs, and the London Health Board follow design principles that underpin our approach:

Borough

focused

and tailored conversations with agreement to cover some common themes and lines of enquiry pan-London so its possible to document collective findings on a bigger footprintPhased conversation with Londoners enabling increasing borough participation at different paces A conversation that includes awareness raising, co-production of solutions moving toward

generating wider

social

action

A conversation that identifies proposals on the wider environment and food choices that could be supported and delivered through the devolution dealA conversation that draws in a wide range of sectors in London with the potential capability to contribute to and effect solutions

A

p

hased conversation to galvanise individual and collective actionSlide4

Emerging design principles

A Phased conversation to galvanise individual and collective action

4

In partnership with London Councils, Public Health England, NHS England, London’s CCGs, London Health Board, London

Obesity Leadership

Group, we are following the following principles to underpin our approach to the London conversation on childhood obesity:Borough focused and tailored conversations with agreement to cover some common themes and lines of enquiry pan-London so its possible to document collective findings on a bigger footprint.Phased conversation with Londoners enabling increasing borough participation at different paces.

A conversation that includes

awareness

raising, co-production of solutions moving toward generating wider social action . A conversation that identifies proposals on the wider environment and food choices that could be supported and delivered through the devolution deal.

A conversation that

draws in a wide range of sectors in London

with the potential capability to contribute to and effect solutions.

4

Conversation Approach and ObjectivesSlide5

Evidence building with professionals

Collected and explore ideas for how to create an environment that will reduce the propensity of London’s children to become obese

E

xplored ideas for galvanizing Londoners to demand a healthier future for our children

3 x roundtables

10 depth interviews Online community to warm up participants To understand where participants are starting from, warm them up for the debate on 17th May and begin to explore some ideas for change 110 participantsDuration of 2 weeks10 participants engaged offline Day-long event – Great Weight DebateDeliberative event to develop and prioritise actions to be taken at national, regional and local levels to tackle childhood obesity in London 110 citizens – reflective of London’s population 18 – 60+ yo across differing BME and social grades and at least 60 with children30 experts

Reporting

In-depth report

Participant-facing summary report

Toolkit to support local engagement (Stage 2)Great Weight Debate 17th May 2016 - Steps

Professionals representing

policy & legislation, industry and public health expertise participated to support the citizens

in

a debate on childhood obesity and

co-created

ideas together

5Slide6

GWD participants were worried about obesity

6

“Not

enough

facilities

for people to workout for free outside as many of the open spaces are gone and kids no longer play outside as before.”“[There’s] easy access to fast food which is very cheap e.g. chicken shops on every corner.”Slide7

GWD participants awareness of childhood obesity as a major challenge for London was low

7

Londoners

recognised

childhood obesity as an important issue for the country but did not spontaneously identify it as a particular challenge for London When statistics on childhood obesity were shared with Londoners they were deeply shocked and surprised that there is not more awareness of this issueProfessionals were much more familiar with the scale of the problem facing London

1 in 4 4-5 year olds in London are overweight or obese 2 in 5 children in London are overweight or obese when they start secondary school When this information was shared in the context of a quiz, all Londoners (and even some professionals) under-estimated the scale of the problem. “I knew obesity is a major problem for London, but I didn’t anticipate the severity [of childhood obesity].” “[I was really surprised by] the number of children who are obese. They don’t all look obese, but I suppose they must be.”Slide8

GWD participants were concerned that London is a difficult city in which to be healthy

8

*Online community. Q: What are the things you don’t like about living in London?

Londoners all spoke of their city as an exciting but stressful place to live

Overcrowded

Expensive PollutedLong hoursLong commutes

And saw the pace of life as having particular challenges for health

Less time for home cooking

Less time for exercise / family activities

Less time to think about health“A lot of the time when it comes to food it is about time. Me and my partner both work, and it’s so easy to get something already prepared from the supermarket and then you regret it later.”Slide9

London ADPH framework was used as a structure for developing ideas to tackle childhood obesity

9

1: Early years

Breastfeeding

Weaning

Knowledge 2: Being active Journeys by foot or by bikeSupporting people to be active3: Public services Health services Public and community settings SchoolsEngagement and commitment

4: Local environments

Accessibility of healthy food

Physical environment

Workplaces Slide10

Brilliant ideas were discussed and recommended

10

Change curriculum to increase amount of PE in school and include PE homework

Would lead to an increase in physical activity and help to embed healthy habits

H

omework could be used to engage the whole family It would be need to be implemented consistently and made fun for children Some concern that setting homework would limit those children whose parents / carers are unwilling or unable to support them to do it“More PE lessons, including homework and nutritional facts, learning what exercises do what, learning how to stay in shape...Children need to know more.” Ban adverts directed at children for foods high in fat, salt and sugarYoung children are very susceptible to advertising so this could play a powerful role in shaping their behavior from a young ageHowever, Londoners and professionals identified food industry opposition as a potential barrier“My 4 year old grandson already knows who is on the billboards along the main roads. He talks about it when they change. It just shows how early it’s all going into their brains.”

Make healthier

foods more available and accessible in all publically funded areas

e.g

. Schools, hospitals, parks, care homes, police stationsWould help establish a united approach to the healthy living messageAnd set an important example to Londoners Whilst also making it easier for them to make healthy choices “Vending machines need to still be there, but the contents of them need to change…It’s what we see that makes us buy things.”Slide11

…and more ideas

11

Change way London’s fast food outlets operate

Work

with existing

outlets & make them healthierHealthy traffic light scheme Subsidized workshops with owners to support them to develop healthy alternatives to existing products Restrict opening times and / or when they can serve certain foods Prevent the opening of new outlets “At the end of the day, you don’t want to shut down people’s livelihoods, so you need to show them another way. Tell them that if it’s between certain times, they can only serve this or that.”Ban promotions of unhealthy food in London and retain a proportion of advertising space in all public places for public health messagesWould send out a powerful signal about how seriously the issue is takenAnd would also ensure that a consistent message is being delivered Whilst also limiting children’s exposure to harmful advertising

“As they’ve done with cigarettes and banned all the adverts – I think all fast food adverts should be banned.”

Use

TfL

signage to encourage active travelBus stops showing the time to walk to next stop and calories you would burn if you did, or steps to walk up an escalatorsConcentrate measures around schools to encourage a more active approach to the school runPerception that this would be affordable as it could largely use existing infrastructure “It might be nice to advertise at bus stops and on the tube, when you are one stop before a certain school station, if you got off and walked the rest of the way, it would take you a certain about of time and would burn a certain amount of calories.”Slide12

Galvanising Londoners

12

They were extremely concerned about the issues raised in the Great Weight Debate

There was agreement that urgent action should be taken to tackle childhood obesity

And that Londoners themselves should be – and would want to be – mobilised in support of this action

“There really needs to be a change in the approach against childhood obesity. You can’t just be neutral, you have to actually be against it, otherwise you are part of the problem.”“We have to do anything we can to reduce this catastrophe.”Participants were clear that urgent action should be taken to tackle childhood obesity Slide13

NEXT STEPS

Build on local conversations currently ongoing and reinforce them to help build local and collective understanding

Identify current infrastructure, strategies, and tools for leveraging opportunity

Share conversation findings, recommendations and common themes

13Slide14

Identify key

stakeholders (Government, policy, decision makers..)

Define stakeholders

Assess

level of commitment and

engagementKey actionsFocus Areas

Stakeholder analysis and mapping

1

Develop

material and collateral for engagement

in collaboration with boroughs

‘How to’ roundtable, focus groups, hackathon

Surveys / questionnaires for boroughs – used across London

Resource hub

Communication strategy and planning

2

Identify methods of engagement with each stakeholder group

Identify timings and

frequency

Complete communications plan

Use

comms

plan to engage with stakeholders and obtain feedback

Engagement tools and materials

3

Validate

and

evaluate engagement and make changes as/when required

Continuous assessment

4

Stage 2 – Local conversations

The following stakeholder management framework will help shape the local conversations work in stage 2

14