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Implement Human Resources




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Presentations text content in Implement Human Resources

Slide1

Implement Human Resources Planning and Operations Using MDMP

February 2015

HR Plans and Operations CourseSenior Leader Training DivisionAdjutant General School

Slide2

Terminal Learning ObjectiveACTION: Implement Human Resources (HR) Planning and Operations using Military Decision Making Process (MDMP)

CONDITION: Using readings, classroom discussions, presentations and doctrinal publications including FM

1-0 (HR Support), ADRP 3-0 (Unified Land Operations), FM 4-0 (Sustainment), FM 6-0 (Commander and Staff Officer Guide), FM 6-01.1 (Knowledge Management Section ADRP 5-0 (The Operations Process) and awareness of Operational Environment (OE), variables and actors.STANDARD: Demonstrate an understanding of HR Planning and Operations using MDMP through classroom participation, completing individual/group practical exercises, and scoring 70% or higher on the HR Plans and Operations end-of-course exam.

2

Slide3

3OutlineThe Operational Concept

Mission Command Unified Land Operations

Plans and Orders Running Estimates HR Planning Considerations HR Planning Using MDMP Commander and Staff Roles Personnel Services Support Appendix

Slide4

ADP 6-0 Figure 1. The exercise of mission command

Mission orders

are directives that emphasize to subordinates the results to be attained, not how they are to achieve them

Use mission orders

Mission Command

Slide5

Unified Land OperationsAnticipated Operational Environment

US must project power into region, opposed

US must seize at least one base of operations (maybe more) Threat of WMD will require dispersal of US forces and decentralized operations Size of theater (space and population) will exceed US ability to control

To cope with these, we must…

1. Develop operations characterized by flexibility, lethality, adaptability, depth, and synchronization

2. Cognitively link tactical actions to strategic objectives

3. Organize effort within a commonly understood construct

Operational Art

The pursuit of strategic objectives, in whole or in part, through the arrangement of tactical actions in time, space, and purpose

Tenets

of Unified Land Operations

Flexibility

Integration

Lethality

Adaptability

Depth

Synchronization

Operations Structure

Provide a broad process for planning and executing operations

Provide basic options for visualizing and describing operations

Provide intellectual organization for common critical tasks

Operations Process

Operational Framework

War Fighting Functions

Terms

Campaign

a series of related major operations aimed at achieving strategic and operational objectives within a given time and space (JP 1-02).

Operation

- a military action, consisting of two or more related tactical actions, designed to achieve a strategic objective, in whole or in part

Army Design Methodology

MDMP

TLP

Prep/Execute/Asses

s

Decisive-Shaping-Sustaining

Deep-Close-Security

Main-Supporting Efforts

Mission Command

Movement and Maneuver

Intelligence

Fires

Sustainment

Protection

FM 3-0

Operations

Tactical action - a battle or engagement, employing lethal and/or non-lethal actions, designed for a specific purpose relative to the enemy, the terrain, friendly forces, or other entity. Tactical actions include such widely varied activities as an attack to seize a piece of terrain or destroy an enemy unit, the defense of a population, and the training of other militaries to assist security forces as part of building partner capacity.

Unified Action

Central idea: synchronization, coordination, and/or integration of the activities of governmental and non-governmental entities with military operations to achieve unity of effort (JP 1)

Unified Land Operations

Seize, retain, and exploit the

initiative

to gain and maintain a position of relative advantage in sustained land operations in order to create the conditions for favorable conflict resolution

To do this, we must…

Army Core Competencies

Combined Arms Maneuver

Wide Area Security

Decisive Action

Offense

Defense

Stability/DSCA

Mission Command

Executed through…

By means of…

Guided by…

Slide6

Operational Environment An operational environment is a composite of the conditions, circumstances, and influences

that affect the employment of capabilities and bear on the decisions of the commander (JP 3-0).

An operational environment includes physical areas (air, land, maritime, and space domains) and cyberspace. It also includes the information that shapes conditions in those areas as well as enemy, adversary, friendly, and neutral aspects relevant to operations.

An operational environment is

not isolated or independent but interconnected

by various influences (for example, information and economics) from around the globe.

OPERATIONAL VARIABLES

MISSION VARIABLES

6

Slide7

Planning Horizons

“….Planning is the art and science of

understanding a situation, envisioning adesired future, and laying out effective ways of bringing that future about.” FM 6-0, Appendix C-1

7

Slide8

Plans and OrdersTypes of Orders

Operation Order (OPORD)

Fragmentary Order (FRAGO) Warning Order (WARNO)Types of Plans Campaign Plan

Operations Plan

Supporting Plan

Concept Plan

Branch

Sequel

8

Sources of Information

Higher headquarters’ OPLAN/OPORD

Maps of the AO

SOPs

Field Manuals

Staff Estimates

Commander’s Guidance

8

Slide9

9 Simple and direct to reduce misunderstanding and confusion

Stated in the affirmative Use doctrinally correct terms and symbols

Avoid meaningless expressions and indecisive or vague language Are brief, clear, and concise Contain assumptions Incorporate flexibility

Allow subordinates time

to collaborate, plan, and prepare their own actions

Effective Plans and Orders

Operation Order

Characteristics

FM 6-0, Annex F, Table C-2

Slide10

(6) Force protection.

(7) As required.4.

SUSTAINMENT a. Logistics. b. Personnel. c. Health System Support.5. COMMAND AND SIGNAL

a. Command

b. Signal

ACKNOWLEDGE: [Commander’s last name]

[Commander’s rank]

OFFICIAL:

[Authenticator’s Name/Position]

ANNEXES

DISTRIBUTION:

[Classification]

[Classification]

OPERATION PLAN/ORDER

[number] [code name]

References

Time Zone Used Throughout the OPLAN/OPORD:

Task Organization

1. SITUATION.

a. Enemy forces.

b. Friendly forces.

c. Environment

(1). Terrain.

(2). Weather.

(3). Civil Considerations.

d. Attachments and detachments.

e. Assumptions.

2. MISSION.

3. EXECUTION

.

Intent:

a. Concept of operations.

SituationMissionExecutionSustainment

Command and SignalOperation Order

(1 of 2)

A directive issued by a commander to subordinate commanders for the purpose of effecting the coordinated execution of an

operation Traditionally called the five paragraph field order, an OPORD contains, as a minimum, descriptions of the following:

10

10

FM 6-0, Annex F, Table C-2

Slide11

(6) Force protection. (7) As required.4.

SUSTAINMENT a. Logistics. b. Personnel.

c. Health System Support5. COMMAND AND SIGNAL a. Command b. SignalACKNOWLEDGE: [Commander’s last name] [Commander’s rank] OFFICIAL:[Authenticator’s Name/Position]ANNEXES

DISTRIBUTION:

[Classification]

OPORD

[Classification]

ANNEX

F

(

SUSTAINMENT)

TO OPORD

XX

1. SITUATION.

2. MISSION

3. EXECUTION

4.

SUSTAINMENT

a.

Logistics

b.

Personnel

c.

Health System Support

5

. COMMAND AND

SIGNAL

ACKNOWLEDGE: [Authenticator’s last name] [Authenticator’s rank]APPENDIXES:1. Logistics

2. Personnel Services Support3. Army Health System SupportDISTRIBUTION: [Classification]

ANNEX F

Appendix 2 - Personnel Services Support

TAB A – Human Resources Support

TAB B – Financial Management

TAB C – Legal Support

TAB D – Religious SupportTAB E – Band OperationsOperation Order(2 of 2)

FM 6-0, Annex F, Table C-2

11

Slide12

Fragmentary and Warning Orders

Used to brief changes to existing order Follows OPORD format

Addresses only those elements that have changed May contain changes to: Situation Mission Execution Sustainment Command and Signal

Expect

many

FRAGOS

in both tactical and garrison operations

Don’t get frustrated

at each FRAGO

Learn to

anticipate changes

Remember the overall

Mission

and Intent

FRAGO

Orders/Plans

Methods of Issue

Orally

Face-to-face

Radio

Telephone

Written Order

WARNO

Provides preliminary notice of actions or orders that are to follow

Gives subordinates maximum time to prepare for an operation

Minimum information includes:

Type of operation

General location Initial timeline Movement or Recon to initiate12

Slide13

Coord

Personnel

Support

Provide HR

Services

HR

Plans &

Opns

Man

The

Force

13

HR Planning

Considerations

Slide14

HR Planning and Operations

“HR

Planning and Operations is the means by which an HR

provider articulates HR operations to support the

operational commander’s mission requirements

.”

FM 1-0, Chapter 6

Must have a firm

understanding

of

the full

capabilities

of HR units and organizations

Understand how to

employ doctrine

in any

operating environment

Be

technically competent

in current HR

systems, processes, policies and

procedures

Understand how HR support is

delivered

in

the operational

environment

Need to

collaborate with other staff elements, HR planners, and HR providers is necessary in order to optimize HR support

14

FM 1-0, Figure 6-1 The Operations Process

Slide15

HR Planning is a continuous process that evaluates current and future operations from a functional perspective of the HR provider.

PREPARE RECOMMENDATIONS

HR unit & system capabilities, limitations, and employment

Risk identification and mitigation

HR organization for operations

Mission Command

relationships

Resource allocation & employment

Location & movement of HR

units

Planning

Develop/Assess

COAs

Assess

HR CRITICAL

TASKS

HR Planning Considerations

ID constraints

ID key facts & assumptions

Formulate HR support

Determine HR resources

ID specified/implied tasks

Prepare Annexes

Prepare OPLANs

Task Org

Unit strength data

Casualty estimates

MOS/ASI shortages

RSO Operations

Evacuation policy

Manning priorities

Key leader reconstitution

Casualty reporting flow Location of MTFs Location of CLTs

Postal flow rate PA/SR reporting Theater policiesContinuous Process

Key HR Planning

Information

HR PPG, Policies,Guidance

15

FM 1-0, para 6-2HR Planning

Slide16

HR Operations is the process of tracking current and future execution of HR support through the following process: Assessing the current situation and forecasting HR requirements based on the progress of the operation Making execution and adjustment decisions to exploit

opportunities or unforecasted requirements Directing actions to apply HR resources and support at decisive points and time

ONGOING

OPERATIONS

CASUALTY

PA / SR

RSO

POSTAL

MWR

Agile and clear HR Policies

Effective HR Practices

Competency-based Skills

Outcome-oriented

Leader Development

F

O

C

U

S

16

FM 1-0,

para

1-25

HR Operations

Slide17

Operate HR

Mission Command Nodes

is establishing, operating, and maintaining connectivity to HR data and voice communications nodes needed for HR operations.

eMILPO

EDAS

TPS

TOPMIS

DTAS

DCIPS

COPS

MEDPROS

RLAS

RCAS

17

FM 1-0,

para

1-26

NIPRNET

SIPRNET

Operate HR Command

and Control Mission Command Nodes

HR Plans & Opns

Key Function

Slide18

HR

Planning

Assessment of the situation from an HR perspectiveAnalysis of those COAs a commander is considering that best accomplishes the missionEvaluation of how HR factors influence each COADraws conclusions

and a recommended COA to the commander from an

HR functional perspective

PURPOSE

Prepared as

thoroughly as time allows

in either a simple form or a preformatted digital product

Revised continuously

as planning factors, manning levels, facts and assumptions change

Prepared at

all levels of command

from Battalion to ASCC by S-1s/G1s and HR Operations Branch planners

Not necessarily prepared in a fixed sequence

Provides a thorough clear,

unemotional analysis

of all pertinent data

CHARACTERISTICS

18

Slide19

Running Estimates

Assessment of the situation from a functional perspective

Analysis of COAs the commander is considering to best accomplish the missionAnalysis of functional factors and how they impact each COABasis for each staff section’s recommendation during COA approvalMay be written or presented orallyUsed by staff officer to support decision making during planning and execution

Personnel (S-1)

Intelligence (S-2)

Operations (S-3)

Sustainment

(S-4)

Civil Affairs

(

S-5)

Signal

(

S-6)

Information

Operations

Special

Staff

(as required)

FUNCTIONAL

STAFF

ESTIMATES

FM 6-0, Chapter 8

19

Continuous assessment

of the current situation used to determine if the current operation is

proceeding according to the commander’s intent

and if planned

future operations are supportable.

Facts

Assumptions

Friendly force status

Enemy activities and capabilities

Civil considerations

Conclusions and recommendations

Continuously

Considered

Slide20

HR Planning ConsiderationsSample Format

MISSION: Commander’s restated mission resulting from mission analysisSITUATION AND CHARACTERISTICS:

Characteristics of the AO: Discuss how the weather, terrain, civil considerations, and other AO-specific conditions affect the HR support to the planned operationEnemy Forces: Discuss any affect enemy dispositions, composition, strength, capabilities and COAs may have on the HR support to the planned operationFriendly Forces: Discuss current status of resources available from the HR perspective and other resources which impact HR support and compare requirements and capabilities to develop recommendations to solve discrepancies. Specific examples follow:Current subordinate unit manning levels/critical MOS shortages (consider all manning influences – Task Organization, R&R flow, Boots On Ground data, etc.)

New personnel requirements resulting from the operation (language skills, ASI, etc.)

Casualty estimates (as developed)

Forecasted replacement availability

Evacuation policy for the operation

20

Slide21

Friendly Forces: (Continued)Supporting HR organizations (location, command/support relationship, controlling element)Supporting medical elementsReplacement fill priority (Coordinate w/S-3/G-3)Crew/key leader replacement

Projected postal flow/limitationsChange to established PA / SR reporting flow/times

Change to casualty reporting flow (CLT change, reporting changes)RSOI Reception HR impactsR&R schedule/flow operational impact (during operations conducted during sustained operations)Civilian and JIIM manning impacts on the operation focusing on strengths and personnel service requirementsSpecific Army G-1 Personnel Planning Guidance (PPG) impacts on the operationStatus of other personnel service or personnel support factors (postal, MWR, legal support, MILPAY support)Sustainment Situation: Discuss the sustainment supporting organizations (TSC, ESC, Sustainment Bdes) and possible impacts on HR support to include: supported/supporting relationship, reporting requirements, transportation planned, MSR status, etc.

21

HR

Planning Considerations

Sample Format

Slide22

Assumptions: List any assumptions that affect the delivery of HR support for the operationCOURSES OF ACTION: COAs: List friendly COAs to be Wargamed

Evaluation Criteria: List HR evaluation criteria determined during COA analysis

ANALYSIS: Analyze each COA using the HR evaluation criteria established during the COA analysis determining advantages and disadvantages of each COACOMPARISON: Compare COAs and rank order from the perspective of HR supportability based on Step 4.RECOMMENDATION and CONCLUSIONS:a. Recommendation: Recommend the most supportable COA from HR support perspective. b. Issues/Risks/Mitigation: List the issues, risks or deficiencies associatedwith the recommended COA and proposed mitigation to reduce the impact on

the

successful execution of the operation.

22

HR

Planning Considerations

Sample Format

Slide23

Check on Learning

What is the difference between “Operational” and “Mission” variables?

Operational variables are those broad aspects of the environment, both military and nonmilitary, that may differ from one operational area to another and affect campaigns and major operations. Operational variables describe not only the military aspects of an operational environment but also the population’s influence on it. Mission variables are those aspects of the operational environment that directly affect a mission. They outline the situation as it applies a specific Army unit.

What are the “Operational” (PMESII-PT) and “Mission” (METT-TC) variables?

P

olitical

M

ilitary

E

conomic

S

ocial

I

nformation

I

nfrastructure

P

hysical Environment

T

ime

M

issionEnemyT

errain and Weather

T

roops and support available

T

ime available

C

ivil considerations

Slide24

Coord

Personnel

Support

Provide HR

Services

HR

Plans &

Opns

Man

The

Force

24

HR Planning

Using the MDMP

Slide25

“The

Military

Decision Making Process is an iterative planning methodology that integrates the activities of the commander, staff, subordinate headquarters, and other partners to understand the situation and mission, develop a course of action and produce an operation plan or order for execution. The MDMP helps leaders apply thoroughness, clarity sound judgment, logic and professional knowledge to understand situations, develop options to solve problems, and reach decisions.MDMP – ADRP 5-0

ADRP, 5-0,

para

2-52, MDMP

25

Chapter

1

– Fundamentals

of

the Operations Process

Chapter

2

– Planning

Chapter 3 – Preparation

Chapter 4 – Execution

Chapter 5 – Assessment

Slide26

CommanderThe commander is in charge of the military decision-making process and decides what procedures to use

in each situation.The commander’s personal role is

central; his/her participation in the process provides focus and guidance to the staff.There are decisions that are the commander’s alone.The

less time

available, the

less experienced

the staff, or the less accessible the staff, generally the

greater the commander involvement.

The Chief of Staff or XO

manages, coordinates

, and

disciplines

the staff’s work and provides

quality control

.

Staff

A military staff is a single,

cohesive unit

organized to help the commander accomplish his mission and execute his other responsibilities.

The staff is an

extension of the commander

, although the staff has no command authority of itself, and is

not in the chain of command.

The staff

exists to serve the commander

and

provides support to other subordinate commands

.

MDMP

Roles

"Your staff won't win the war for you, but it can prevent you from winning." BG John E. Miller

26

ATTP 5-0.1, Paragraph 4-8 thru 4-11

Slide27

27Knowledge Management Is the art of creating, organizing, applying, and transferring knowledge to facilitate situational understanding and decision making Supports improving organizational learning, innovation, and performance

Processes ensure that knowledge products and services are relevant, accurate, timely, and useable to commanders and decision makers Helps commanders make informed, timely decisions despite the fog and friction of operations

Enables effective collaboration by linking organizations and Soldiers requiring knowledge Enhances rapid adaptation in dynamic operations Applies analysis and evaluation to information to create knowledge Defining information requirements is an important aspect of knowledge management to focus development of knowledge products (e.g., CCIRs)

Three Major Components of KM

People

—those inside and outside the organization who create, organize, share, and

use knowledge, and the leaders who foster an adaptive, learning environment.

Processes

—the methods to create, capture, organize, and apply knowledge.

Technology

—information systems that help collect, process, store, and display knowledge. Technology helps put knowledge products and services into organized frameworks.

Reference: FM 6-01.1

Slide28

What is the Senior HR Professional’s

role in

the Military Decision Making Process?

Data

Information

Knowledge

Wisdom

What?

So what?

Which means?

Therefore?

Company

Grade

Field Grade

What

you want…

Asking the right question…

Situational

Understanding

Optimal

Decisions

Situational

Awareness

28

Slide29

Higher headquarters’ plans, orders,

or a new mission anticipated by the commander

Mission statement Initial commander’s intent, planning guidance, CCIRs and EEFIs Updated IPB and running estimatesAssumptions Updated running estimates Refined COAs

Evaluation Criteria

War-game

results

Updated assumptions

Updated running estimates

Evaluated COAs

Recommend

COA

Updated assumption

Commander selected

COA with

any modifications

Refined commander’s

intent

CCIRs and EEFIs

Updated running estimates

Revised planning guidance

COA statements and

sketches

Updated assumptions

Step 1:

Receipt of Mission

Step 2

Mission Analysis

Step 3

COA Development

Step 4

COA Analysis

(War Game)

Step 6

COA Approval

Step 7

Orders Production

WARNING ORDER

Step 5

COA Comparison

Commander’s initial

guidance

Initial

allocation of time

Problem statement

Mission statement Initial commander’s intent Initial planning guidance

Initial CCIRs and EEFIs Updated IPB and running estimatesAssumptions

COA statements and sketches - Tentative task organization - Broad concept of operations

Revised planning guidanceUpdated assumptions

Evaluated COAs Recommended COAs Updated running estimatesUpdated assumptions

Approved operation plan or orderSubordinates understand the plan or order

Refined COAs Potential decision points War game results Initial assessment measuresUpdated assumptions

Sync Matrix

WARNING ORDER

WARNING ORDER

Commander selected COA

and any

modification Refined commander’s intent, CCIRs, and EEFIsUpdated assumptions

Higher headquarters’ plan or order Higher headquarters’ knowledge and intelligence products Knowledge products from other organizations Army design methodology products)

ADRP 5-0, Figure 2-629

KEY

INPUTS KEYOUTPUTS

STEPS

Slide30

30

Receive the Mission(MDMP Step 1)

Higher HQ Plan or OrderNew mission anticipated by the commanderCurrent situational understandingRunning EstimatesDesign Products

Staff alerted

Planning tools and references gathered

Initial allocation of time

Conduct initial assessment

Intel gaps identified

List of initial RFIs

Initial R&S requirements

Cdr’s initial guidance

Updated Running Estimates

Planning area established

Initial Warning Order

HHQ Order

Doctrine

HHQ Cdr’s Intent

HHQ Cdr’s Guidance

TACSOP

FM 6-0

Commander

Staff

HR

Planning Using the MDMP

(1 of 8)

Slide31

HR Planning Using the MDMP(1 of 8)

Input

Receipt of plans, orders and guidance from higher HQs

New mission anticipated by the commander

Process

Gather tools

Update HR Estimate

Conduct initial assessment

Output

Cdr’s initial guidance

Initial operational timeline

Initial WARNO

31

Slide32

32

Mission Analysis

(MDMP Step 2)Higher HQ Plan or OrderHigher HQ and other knowledge productsCommander’s initial guidanceUpdated running estimatesCOA evaluation criteria(from CDR’s initial guidance)

Approved problem statement

Issue Warning Order

Approved mission statement

Initial commander’s intent

Updated IPB products

Information themes & messages

Initial CCIR/EEFI

Initial collection requirements

Initial Cdr’s planning guidance

Updated Running Estimates

Assumptions

Resource shortfalls

Updated operational timeline

COA analysis criteria

Guidance

Doctrine

TACSOP

FM 6-0

Commander

Staff

HR

Planning Using the MDMP

(2

of 8)

Slide33

How does the commander’s intent focus HR support efforts?

Unit and system capabilities, limitations, and employment

including ability to access voice and data systems

for

HR/MC

Unit organization for HR Operations / Manpower allocations

Personnel Strength Data / Unit Strength Maintenance

HR Support and Services

Prepare estimates for Personnel Replacements based on

casualties, non-battle losses, and projected administrative losses

Prepare Casualty Estimates

Command and support relationships

As part of

Mission Analysis

, the mission is clearly

stated and the commander provides

“commander’s

intent,”

planning guidance and identifies CCIR and EEFIs.

HR Planners need to consider:

33

HR

Planning Using the MDMP

(2

of 8)

Slide34

Resource allocation and synchronization of organic and

supporting units

Locations and movement of HR units and supporting HROB

Current and near-term (future) execution of HR support

Updating the running estimate / personnel estimate

Knowledge of unit mission and mission of supported/supporting

units

Identify key specified and implied tasks

Identify constraints and how the end state affects HR shortfalls

Identify key facts and assumption

Prepare, authenticate and distribute the HR Plan in the form of

approved annexes, estimates, appendices, and OPLANS

Identify initial CCIRS and EEFIs

Issue / receive warning order update

Mission Analysis

(con’t)

34

HR

Planning Using the MDMP

(3

of 8)

Slide35

35

Course of Action Development(MDMP Step 3)

Approved problem statementApproved mission statementInitial Cdr’s intent, planning guidance, CCIR, & EEFIUpdated IPB & running estimatesAssumptionsDesign concept (if developed)Specified & implied tasks

COA Statements

-Tentative task organization

-Broad concept of operations

COA sketches

Cdr’s revised planning guidance

-War-gaming criteria

-Evaluation criteria

Updated Running Estimates

Updated IPB products

Updated assumptions

TACSOP

FM 6-0

Doctrine

Cdr’s Planning Guidance

Commander

Staff

Commander’s Intent

FADS-C Criteria

COA Evaluation Criteria

HR

Planning Using the MDMP

(3

of 8)

Slide36

The

COA Development

phase for the HR Planner involves: Development of a broad concept of operation and sustainment

concept

Revising planning guidance as

necessary

Determining HR resources required to support each

COA

Reviewing each COA to ensure it supports the commander’s

intent

Determining and refining casualty estimations for each

COA

Ensuring HR capabilities, strength impacts, and HR asset vulnerabilities are

considered

Ensuring deployment, intra-Theater transit or movements, and redeployment are

considered

Ensuring current and future HR operations are included in

COA

36

HR

Planning Using the MDMP

(4

of 8)

Slide37

37

Course of Action Analysis(MDMP Step 4)

Updated running estimatesRevised Cdr’s planning guidanceUpdated IPB & running estimatesCOA StatementsCOA SketchesUpdated assumptions

Refined COAs

Potential decision points

War-game results

Initial assessment measures

Decision support matrix

Decision support template

Potential branches & sequels

Updated running estimates

Synchronization matrix

Updated assumptions

TACSOP

FM 6-0

Doctrine

Cdr’s Guidance

Commander

Staff

Commander’s Intent

FADS-C Criteria

COA Evaluation Criteria

HR

Planning Using the MDMP

(4

of 8)

Slide38

The

COA

Analysis (War Game) step is where COAs are refined, the running estimate is updated, and making changes made to the planning guidance. Specific HR planning actions include

:

Refining the status of all HR friendly forces

Listing critical HR events in war gaming

Determining how HR events will be evaluated

Determining potential decision points, branches, or sequels

Assessing the results of the war gaming (from an HR perspective)

38

HR

Planning Using the MDMP

(5

of 8)

Slide39

39

Course of Action Comparison(MDMP Step 5)

Updated running estimatesRefined COAsEvaluation CriteriaWar-Game resultsUpdated assumptions

Evaluated COAs

Recommended COAs

Updated running estimates

Updated assumptions

COA selection rationale

TACSOP

FM 6-0

Doctrine

Cdr’s Guidance

Commander

Staff

Commander’s Intent

FADS-C Criteria

HR

Planning Using the MDMP

(5

of 8)

Slide40

COA Comparison

compares the COAs evaluated in Step 4 with the results of the war game to determine the recommended COA. Specific actions include:

Refining COAs based on war game

results

Comparing relative success of achieving HR success by each

COA

Identifying the advantages and disadvantages of each

COA

Identifying any critical areas of HR support which may impact on each COA, if

any

Identifying major deficiencies in manpower or in number of HR units, teams, or

squads

Recommending the best COA from an HR

perspective

40

HR

Planning Using the MDMP

(6

of 8)

Slide41

41

Course of Action Approval(MDMP Step 6)

Updated running estimatesEvaluated COAsRecommended COAUpdated assumptions

CDR selected COA (w/modifications)

Refined Commander’s intent

Refined CCIRs

Refined EEFI

Updated assumptions

Final Cdr’s planning guidance

Issue Warning Order

TACSOP

FM 6-0

Doctrine

Cdr’s Guidance

Commander

Staff

Commander’s Intent

HR

Planning Using the MDMP

(6

of 8)

Slide42

COA Approval.

The commander selects and modifies the COA. Specific actions include:

Selecting best COA; modifies as

necessary

Refining commander’s intent, CCIRs, and essential elements of friendly

information

Issuing the warning

order

42

HR

Planning Using the MDMP

(7

of 8)

Slide43

43

Orders Production(MDMP Step 7)

Cdr selected COA w/any modificationsRefined commander’s intentRefined CCIRRefined EEFIUpdated assumptionsFinal Cdr’s planning guidance

Approved OPLAN or OPORD

Schedule for rehearsals

TACSOP

FM 6-0

Doctrine

Cdr’s Guidance

Commander

Staff

Commander’s Intent

HR

Planning Using the MDMP

(6

of 8)

Slide44

Orders Production.

Prepare, authenticate, and distribute the operation plan or order.

44

HR Planners will ensure

Risk

Management

is

included

in each

phase of the

operations planning process

.

HR

Planning Using the MDMP

(8

of 8)

ATP 5-19 (

dtd

April 2014), Table 4-1

Slide45

45

Parallel Planning

Slide46

Synchronization Matrix

PRM

PA

SR

PIM

MAN THE FORCE

HR SERVICES

PERSONNEL SPT

CC

DEPLOY

BUILD UP

MVMT TAA TO ATK

ATK POS TO OBJ

EST SEC & RES SVCS

CIV AUTH / REDEPLOY

EPS

CAS

OPS

PSTL

OPS

MWR

BAND

HR PLANS

OPNS

PIR

EEFI

SRP / SOLDIER READINESS /

AVAIL STRENGTH / COORD

REAR DET REPORTING

ID CRITICAL SHORTFALLS /

MONITOR GAINS / BUILD

MANIFEST IN TPS

FINALIZE REPORTING

PROCEDURES FOR SUB

UNITS

UPDATE MPFs / UPDATE

EMILPO / DUIC POPULATED

UPDATE DD93 / SGLV ‘

DEERS RAPIDS CAC /

EST. CDR’S AWARD PGM

AND POLICY

COOR REAR DET EFFORTS

W/FRG / DEVELOP SCMO

ROSTER / REHEARSEBLACKOUT OPNS FOR NIPRCONNECTIVITY1

ST CLASS LETTER MAILONLYN/A

N/A

N/AN/A

1. REDIRECT / DELAY OF ANYCHALK2. ANY BN UNDER 90%

TRACK BCT CMT POWER /INPUT TO CCIR/EEFI / COORDREAR DET RPT / USRTRACK BCT CMT POWER /REPL/CAS FLOW / COORDREAR DET RPT / USR

MONITOR CRITICAL MOS / CASRATES / CCIR & EEFI / COORDREAD DET RPT / USRTRACK CBT PWR / CROSS-LEVELACROSS BCT / COORD

READ DET RPT / USRTRACK CBT PWR / CROSS-LEVELACROSS BCT / COORDREAD DET RPT / USR

PHASE 1

PHASE 2

PHASE 3PHASE 4

PHASE 5PHASE 6

ESTABLISH BATTLE RHYTHM

FOR JPERSTAT

EMPLOY DTAS; MONITORSUBORDINATE UNITSUPDATE ORB / ERBCONTINUE TO PROVIDE EPS AS REQUIREDID & COORD WITH MORTUARYAFFAIRS / CONTACT CLT ATCSH / MTF; ESTABLISH DCIPSACCOUNT BPT TO ESTABLISH MAIL OPS

(DISTRO PTS); 1ST CLASS MAILONLY

COORD W/EXISTING CMD FORMWR USAGE; COORD CHAPAND SJA SUPPORT

N/ABPT TO ISSUE GUIDANCE /FRAGO ON TASK ORG; PREP

UNIT AWARD/STREAMERCITATION

1. REDIRECT / DELAY OF ANYCHALK2. ANY BN UNDER 90%3. KEY LEADER STATUS

MAINTAIN BATTLE RHYTHM

FOR DTAS UPDATESMAINTAIN BATTLE RHYTHM

FOR JPERSTAT

EMILPO CONTINUES AS SYSTEM OF RECORD; CONTINUE TO SYNC EMILPOWITH DTAS DATA

CONTINUE TO PROVIDE EPS AS REQUIRED

COORD WITH BCT SURGEONS3 / S4 FOR CASEVAC ROUTES

MEDEVAC PZ EST HOLD ON MAIL AT TG; NO

MAIL DISTRO DURING MVMTPHASECOORD FOR CHAPLAIN

ACTIVITIES AND SJA AVAIL

COORD FOR BAND SUPPORT AT MEMORIAL SERVICES / VIPVISITS /CEREMONIES AS REQUIRED

N/A

N/A

SIZE, DISPOSITION. LOCATION

OF ENEMY ELEMENT ALONG

ROUTE

1. ANY BN UNDER 90%

2. KEY LEADER STATUS

3. LOSS OF SUPPORT SRC-12

UNIT / ELEMENT

MAINTAIN BATTLE RHYTHM

FOR DTAS UPDATES; UTILIZE

CLT TO TRACK CASUALTIES

MAINTAIN BATTLE RHYTHM

FOR DTAS UPDATES; UTILIZE

CLT TO TRACK CASUALTIES

MAINTAIN BATTLE RHYTHM

FOR DTAS UPDATES; COORD WITH

REAR DETACHMENT

SIZE, DISPOSITION. LOCATION

OF ENEMY ELEMENT ALONG

ROUTE

SIZE, DISPOSITION. LOCATION

OF ENEMY ELEMENT ALONG

ROUTE

1. ANY BN UNDER 90%

2. KEY LEADER STATUS

3. LOSS OF SUPPORT SRC-12

UNIT / ELEMENT

1. ANY BN UNDER 90%

2. KEY LEADER STATUS

3. LOSS OF SUPPORT SRC-12

UNIT / ELEMENT

1. REDIRECT / DELAY OF ANY

CHALK

2. ANY LOSS IN FORCE FLOW

3. NOTIFICATION OF NOK

N/A

COORD FOR BAND SUPPORT

AT MEMORIAL SERVICES / VIP

VISITS /CEREMONIES AS

REQUIRED

COORD F

AT MEM

VISITS /CE

REQUIRED

ORT

VIP

REVIEW REDEPLOYME

ESTABLISH / UPDATE TI

GUIDANCE / PUBLISH FRAGO

N/A

PREP

REDEP CEREMONIES

DEPLOYMENT CYCLE SPT PGM

NO CHANGE FROM PHAS

NO CH

MAINTAIN BATTLE RHYTHM

FOR JPERSTAT

EMILPO CONTINUES AS

SYSTEM OF RECORD;

CONTINUE TO SYNC EMI

WITH DTAS DATA

CONTINU

EPS AS

EMILPO CONTINUES AS

SYSTEM OF RECORD;

CONTINUE TO SYNC EMILPO

DTAS DATA

MAINTAIN BATTLE RHYTHM

FOR JPERSTAT

AWARD PROCESSING; COMPLETE

CASUALTY DOCUMENTATION;

CAC ISSUE; CEREMONY SUPPORT

46

Slide47

What is the S-1’s role in the MDMP process?What are the seven (7) steps of MDMP and the five (5) steps of Composite Risk Management?MDMP

Step 1 – Receipt of MissionStep 2 – Mission AnalysisStep 3 – COA Development

Step 4 – COA AnalysisStep 5 – COA ComparisonStep 6 – COA ApprovalStep 7 – Orders ProductionThe S-1 conducts mission analysis and provides critical HR input to theMDMP. Their responsibilities include: analyze personnel/unit strengthdata; prepare the HR PLANNING CONSIDERATIONS; determine available PSS; determine HR task and constrains; identify critical facts and assumptions; determine CCIR and EEFI.

Check on Learning

47

CRM

Step 1 – Identify Hazards

Step 2 – Assess Hazards

Step 3 – Develop Controls

Step 4 – Implement Controls

Step 5 – Supervise & Evaluate

Slide48

Coord

Personnel

Support

Personnel

Services

Support

Appendix

Provide HR

Services

HR

Plans &

Opns

Man

The

Force

48

Slide49

Personnel AppendixAPPENDIX 2 (PERSONNEL SERVICE SUPPORT) TO ANNEX F (SUSTAINMENT)

TAB A – Human Resources Support

TAB B – Financial ManagementTAB C – Legal SupportTAB D – Religious SupportTAB E – Band Operations49

Slide50

Tab A to Appendix 2 to Annex FHR Input

Reference:

Time Zone Used Throughout the OPLAN/OPORD: (Local)SITUATION. a. Area of Interest

b.

Area of Operations

c.

Enemy Forces

d. Friendly Forces

e. Interagency, Intergovernmental, and Nongovernmental

Organizations and Contractors who Deploy with the Force

f. Civil Considerations

g. Attachments and Detachments

h. Assumptions

Mission.

Include information affecting HR

operations not covered in paragraph

1 of the OPORD/OPLAN or information that needs to be expanded.

Running Estimates begin upon receipt of mission and

continue through all phases of the Operations Process

to include:

Planning

Preparation

Execution

Assessment

State the mission of the HR functional area in support of the base plan or order

50

Slide51

Execution.a. Scheme of Support

(1) Manning the Force

(a) Personnel Accountability(b) Strength Reporting(c) Personnel Readiness Management

(d) Personnel Information Management

(2) Provide HR Services

(a) Casualty Operations Management

(b) Essential Personnel Services

(c) Postal Operations

51

How does HR operations support the

Commander’s intent

and

concept of operations

?

Establish

priorities of support

for each phase of the operation.

List any new personnel requirements (language, ASI, etc)

Replacements

Key leader or crew replacement

Other manning guidance

By-name management of location and duty status

Tracking personnel movement as they arrive at, depart from, home station, APOE/APOD

Location of supporting PAT

Manning Levels

Critical MOS shortage

Reporting requirements

Timelines

Other info impacting operations

All info to support postal operations

Logistics and planning for issues such as air/ground transportation

Specialized equipment, facilities, etc.

Hours of operations

Postal finance operations (stamps, money orders, etc)

Accountable mail

Claims and inquires

Information available to assist commander in decision making process for HR functions and actions

ID systems, priorities, NIPR/SIPR requirements, system access and availability

List each function that supports individual career advancement and development, proper identification documents, benefits entitlements, recognition of achievement or service.

Awards and Decorations

Promotions and Reductions

Evaluations

MILPAY

Leave and Pass Separation/LODs

PRM issues impacting:

Current capabilities Future requirements Retention

Current Readiness Status

HR Services that have a direct impact on a Soldier’s: Status Assignment

Qualifications Financial Status Career Progression Quality of Life

All actions relating to Casualty Reporting Submission of reports Notification of NOK Assistance to NOK

LOD Determination AR 15-6 investigation Disposition of remains and PE Military burial honors Casualty mail Location of CLTs Casualty Estimates

Timelines

Tab A to Appendix 2 to Annex F

HR Input

Slide52

(3) Personnel Support

(a) Morale, Welfare, and Recreation

(b) Command Interest Programs(4) HR Planning and Operationsb. Tasks to Subordinate Units

c. Coordinating Instructions

4. Sustainment

5. Command

and Signal

52

Functions that affect MWR

Include info on:

MWR augmentation

Unit recreation

Books

Sports programs

Rest areas for brigade-size and larger units

Community support programs such as ARC, AAFES, and family support program.

Describe how CIPs impact operations

Information should include:

Voting

EO

ASAP

Family Readiness

Describe how HR Planning and Staff Operations support the operational mission and effective ways of achieving success.

Include expected requirements and outcomes identified in the MDMP process and in establishing and operating HR nodes

List functional area tasks to specific subordinate units not contained in the base order

List only instructions applicable to two or more subordinate units not covered in the base order.

ID and highlight any functional area-specific timings, information themes and messages, risk reduction control measures, and environmental considerations

ID priorities of sustainment for functional area key tasks and specify additional instructions as required.

Refer to Annex F (Sustainment) as required

Command

. State the location of HR functional leaders and command relationships

Liaison Requirements

. State the HR liaison requirements not covered in the base order

Signal.

Address any HR-specific communications requirements such as connectivity (SIPR/NIPR), bandwidth, port accessibility, hardware setup and systems vulnerabilities.

Tab A to Appendix 2 to Annex F

HR Input

Slide53

Rehearsing key actions before execution allows Soldiers to become familiar with the operation and translate the abstract ideas of the written plan into concrete actions. Each rehearsal type achieves a different result and has a specific place in the preparation timeline.

Rehearsals

The four types of rehearsals are— Backbrief Combined arms rehearsal

Support rehearsal

Battle drill or SOP rehearsal

53

ATTP 5-0.1, Chapter 8

Slide54

Why Rehearse?"The best benefit of the ROC Drill was the fact that we had key planners, leaders and commanders of the units who will be supported and supporting this Responsible Drawdown."

BG Mark J. MacCarley, 1TSC, Deputy CG on the drawdown of troops in Iraq

Properly executed, Rehearsals —

Help commanders

visualize conditions

associated with decision making

before, during, and after

the operation.

Help prepare commanders and staffs to

synchronize

the operation

at key points

. Rehearsals do this by identifying actions, times, and locations that require coordination.

Reveal unidentified

external coordination

requirements.

Support internal coordination by

identifying tasks needed

to accomplish

external coordination

.

Help staff sections

update internal coordination tools

, such as the synch matrix and decision support template.

ADRP 5-0,

para

3-17

54

Slide55

Rehearsal TechniquesFM 6-0, Figure 12-1

Considerations

Time – the amount of time required to conduct (plan, prepare, execute, and assess) the rehearsal Echelons involved – the number of echelons that can participate in the rehearsal

Operations security risk

– the ease by which adversary can exploit friendly actions from the rehearsal

Terrain

– the amount of space needed for the rehearsal

55

Slide56

Relationships

Command

SupportVS

A key element for Sustainment Operations lies in the type of relationship established between commands for support

56

FM 6-0

Slide57

Command RelationshipADRP 5-0, Table 2-1

Command and support relationships provide the basis for unity of command and unity of effort in operations. Command relationships affect Army force generation, force tailoring, and task organization.

Commanders use Army support relationships when task-organizing Army forces. All command and support relationships fall within the framework of joint doctrine.57

Slide58

Support Relationship58

Command relationships establish the degree of control and responsibility commanders have for forces operating under their control.

Who’s

responsible

for

PA / SR

Slide59

59SummaryThe Operational Concept

Mission Command Unified Land Operations

Plans and Orders Running Estimates HR Planning Considerations HR Planning Using MDMP Commander and Staff Roles Personnel Services Support Appendix Command Relationships

Slide60

Terminal Learning ObjectiveACTION: Implement Human Resources (HR) Planning and Operations using Military Decision Making Process (MDMP)

CONDITION: Using readings, classroom discussions, presentations and doctrinal publications including FM

1-0 (HR Support), ADRP 3-0 (Unified Land Operations), FM 4-0 (Sustainment), ATTP 5-0.1 (Commander and Staff Officer Guide), FM 6-01.1 (Knowledge Management Section ADRP 5-0 (The Operations Process) and awareness of Operational Environment (OE), variables and actors.STANDARD: Demonstrate an understanding of HR Planning and Operations using MDMP through classroom participation, completing individual/group practical exercises, and scoring 70% or higher on the HR Plans and Operations end-of-course exam.

60


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