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Nutrient Management – Now and in the Future
Nutrient Management – Now and in the Future

Nutrient Management – Now and in the Future - PowerPoint Presentation

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Nutrient Management – Now and in the Future - Description

Richard Ferguson Tim Shaver University of Nebraska Origins of Soil Spatial V ariability Natural Soil f c o r p t H Jenny 1941 c climate o organisms plants microbes insects animals ID: 540065 Download Presentation

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sensor soil crop control soil sensor control crop swath yield fertilizer irrigation water grain field canopy variability systems gps

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Presentation on theme: "Nutrient Management – Now and in the Future"— Presentation transcript

Slide1

Nutrient Management – Now and in the Future

Richard Ferguson

Tim Shaver

University of NebraskaSlide2
Slide3
Slide4

Origins of

Soil Spatial

V

ariability

Natural:

Soil = f (c, o, r, p, t) H. Jenny (1941)c: climateo: organisms (plants, microbes, insects, animals)r: relief (topography) p: parent materialt: timeManagement induced (humans):Land use (cropping systems, field boundaries)Old roads, farmsteads, etc.Earth movement (land leveling, terraces)Tillage & trafficPlanting patterns (e.g., in row crops)Fertilizer application, other amendments (lime, manure)Irrigation & salinityCrop nutrient removal (yield and crop residue management)Slide5

Goal: To manage spatial and temporal availability of inputs, including fertilizer, for optimal crop production and efficiency of resources.

This requires an understanding of the variability of soil resources, and the ability to apply fertilizer at the right time and rate.Slide6

Measurement of Spatial Variability in Fields

Experience

County soil survey maps

Photographs & multispectral imagery

AerialSatellite

Yield mapsTopography/digital elevation models (DEM)Apparent soil electrical conductivity (ECa)Grid or directed soil samplesSoil sensorsElectrochemicalElectrical & electromagneticMechanicalOpticalCrop canopy sensorsOpticalAcousticThermalSlide7

Yield Mapping CombineSlide8

Grain Yield Monitor Components

Moisture Sensor

Grain Flow Sensor

GPS

Antenna

Yield Monitor Display with a GPS Receiver

Header Position Sensor

Travel Speed Sensor

Clean Grain Elevator Speed SensorSlide9

Veris

3100 Soil

EC

a

MeasurementSlide10

Veris

MSP: Soil pH and

EC

aSlide11

Crop Canopy Sensors

Crop Circle

ACS-210

2 band

Crop Circle

ACS-4703 bandUltrasonic height sensors

Canopy temperature sensor

CropScan

2 band (laser)Slide12

Holland Scientific, Lincoln, NE.

Distribution agreement with Ag Leader (

OptRx

system)

2 foot sensing footprint

Crop CircleSlide13

Field Variability

Natural color aerial photo

S

oil series

Grain yield

Soil apparent electrical conductivity

False color infrared image

Directed soil sample – Bray-1

P

Active sensor canopy reflectanceSlide14

Apparent soil deep electrical conductivity overlaid on elevation

Grain yield overlaid on elevationSlide15

Current and Emerging Agricultural TechnologiesSlide16

AutosteerSlide17
Slide18

Swath Control

Investments for planter clutches and boom section plumbing for sprayers will vary widely, with costs increasing for more precise control.

Savings and gains in efficiency will increase as field shapes becomes more irregular.Slide19

Swath Control

Standard planter or sprayer approach

Planter or sprayer with swath control on every row or nozzleSlide20

Swath Control – Economic Impact

A University of Kentucky study found substantial input cost savings from swath control adoption on irregularly shaped fields.

At

medium fertilizer rates, moving from

lightbar

direction to lightbar direction with swath control resulted in savings of $25 to $33.48/acre. Presented at the 9th

International Conference on Precision Agriculture, Denver, CO, July 2008

.

Field shapes used in University of Kentucky study. Slide21

Implement Steering OptionsSlide22

High Clearance Sprayers

In-season pesticide and fertilizer applicationSlide23

Linear Move and Center Pivot Irrigation Systems

GPS Guidance and Variable Rate IrrigationSlide24

Variable Rate IrrigationSlide25

Optical Mapping of Soil Organic MatterSlide26

Soil Organic Matter (%)

South Central Agricultural Laboratory

November 2010Slide27

Soil Sensor Research

On-the-go measurement of mechanical resistance, soil moisture, and soil reflectance in visible and near-infrared bands.Slide28

Hyperspectral Mapping of Soil Profile

Reflectance in 384 wavebands (4 shown)Slide29

John Deere Water ManagementSlide30

Automated Monitoring and Telemetry Systems

Total Profile Water

Allowable Depletion

Full Profile

Profile Water Content

20”

36”

12”

4”

8”

Date

Water

ContentSlide31

Wireless Soil Water Monitoring NetworkSlide32

Remote Control of Irrigation Systems

Pictures Courtesy of Valmont IndustriesSlide33

Three-axis attitude sensor

GPS antenna

Radio modem and antenna

Air tanks and pistons for retractable landing gear

Gyroscope

Video transmitter and antenna

Remote-Sensing Unmanned Aerial Vehicles (UAVs)

To monitor crop stress and onset of insect or disease infestationSlide34

Crop Cam

OktoCopter

UAVs for Aerial ImagerySlide35

OktoCopter FlightAustria - 2010Slide36

Robotics in AgricultureSlide37

Questions?