Public Perspectives on Personalized PowerPoint Presentation

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Medicine . National survey of U.S. . adults. May 2018. Survey conducted by. Survey conducted . for. Table of Contents. Background. 3. Objectives and Methodology. 4. Executive Summary. 5. Key. Findings. ID: 738039

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Presentations text content in Public Perspectives on Personalized

Slide1

Public Perspectives on

Personalized Medicine

National survey of U.S.

adultsMay 2018Survey conducted by

Survey conducted

for

Slide2

Table of Contents

Background

3

Objectives and Methodology4Executive Summary5Key Findings

6

Detailed Findings

10

Awareness of and Interest in Personalized Medicine

11Excitement and Worry around Personalized Medicine24Experiences with and Perceptions of Genetic Testing35Attitudes around Genetic Testing Public Policies43Appendix47

2

Slide3

BACKGROUND

Objectives

and Methodology

Slide4

Research Objectives and Method

Objectives

The survey objectives were to:

Gauge public awareness of and familiarity with personalized and precision medicine and related topics;Measure public experiences related to personalized medicine in clinical settings;Gauge public interest in and questions about personalized medicine;Measure public receptivity to personalized medicine, including perceived benefits and concerns; and

Assess any changes in awareness or attitudes compared to PMC’s benchmark research

conducted in March 2014.

4

Method

KRC Research conducted a 20-minute national survey of 1,001 U.S. adults 18 years and older.

The survey was

administered online from February 23 to March 2, 2018. The sample for the survey was randomly drawn from a large national Survey Sampling panel of U.S. adults. KRC established demographic quotas (region, sex, age, education, and race/ethnicity) and weighted data to ensure the sample is

demographically representative of the U.S

.

population based on Census data.

While personalized medicine’s potential is well-recognized by many medical experts, a survey commissioned by PMC in 2014 showed limited public awareness of the field. Since then, the U.S. government has made personalized medicine a national priority through its

All of Us

Research Program.

Slide5

EXECUTIVE SUMMARY

Key Findings

Slide6

Key Findings

: Awareness of personalized medicine remains low, but interest is on the rise.

6

Awareness of

personalized

medicine remains low.

Similarly to 2014, just over a third of Americans have heard of

personalized medicine, with just 1 in 4 confirming that a description of personalized medicine aligned with what they heard.

Those who pay close attention to health news and policy are most

aware,

but even among this group awareness is fewer than half.Of those who say they are aware, most aren’t able to provide many details.The concept of personalized medicine elicits very positive reactions.After reading a brief description of personalized medicine,

two-thirds of Americans have a positive

reaction,

saying that they can see the benefits it will have to

society

and to

them personally

. The remainder are neutral, because they do not know enough to say.

Since 2014, interest in personalized medicine has

grown dramatically.

Over eight in 10 would like to learn more about

personalized

medicine,

up 13 percentage points since

2014.

How

personalized medicine

can

be used to treat

cancer is the

number one

thing

people would like

to learn

about.

Slide7

Key Findings

: Excitement and value outweigh concerns.

7

The

possibility of disease prevention

and

detection excites people most.

Six

in 10

say these benefits are very

exciting.Reducing trial-and-error medicine is seen as the biggest benefit.Seven in 10 say this is a major benefit.Those who have witnessed a life-threatening illness see the most benefit from personalized medicine.Most don’t have

pre-established concerns about

personalized medicine.

Top-of-mind

concerns

involve questions about safety, side effects, and reliability.

When

shown

potential concerns,

the biggest

fear

is that personalized medicine

will not be covered by

insurers and people won’t be able to afford it.

Those in

poor health

and/or those who

have personal experience with life threatening illnesses

are most concerned about coverage.

Most believe that insurance companies should cover p

ersonalized

medicine.

Two-thirds see the value outweighing the

cost. This

is especially true of those who could benefit from tests and treatments more immediately, or could have in the past.

Slide8

Key Findings

: Most do not have personal experience with personalized medicine, but most are willing to use it.

8

Americans are likely to use

personalized

medicine if their doctor recommends

it, but they have questions.

Over 8 in 10 adults would be likely to use

personalized

medicine for developing a specific treatment plan for a disease they already have, treating a disease informed by a genetic test, or to prevent illness, provided their doctor recommended it.

Adults mostly want to know how personalized medicine works, what side effects there are, if it is effective, and what the costs are.Very few are discussing genetic testing, have ever heard of or spoken to a genetic counselor, or have purchased an at-home DNA test to check for their risk of developing certain diseases.Only one in 10 say their doctor has talked with them or recommended genetic testing. Those who

have gotten a genetic test did so to

prevent

disease, predict if a specific medicine would help treat a

disease, or predict the

likelihood of getting a disease.

Only about 1 in 5 have

heard of genetic counseling, and of those a quarter have spoken to a genetic counselor.

Even fewer (6%)

have

purchased an at-home DNA

test to check for the risk of disease.

Slide9

Key Findings

: When it comes to policy, Americans want more information made available and lower costs.

9

Awareness of the Genetic Information Nondiscrimination Act (GINA) is low, but Americans are likely to feel more comfortable as opposed to less comfortable with genetic testing after learning

about it.

More

than

8 in 10 are unaware of GINA, but after learning about it, nearly one-third feel more comfortable with genetic testing (only one in 10 feel less comfortable

).

Additionally

, few adults are aware of the All of Us Research Program.Less than one in 10 are aware of the All of Us Research Program.Most do

not want increased out-of-pocket costs

or

government or insurance

company

control of who is able to access

personalized

medicine.

Increased government or insurance

company control

over who gets covered and who

doesn’t — as well as higher

out-of-pocket

costs to cover personalized

tests —

are

mostly

viewed as

unacceptable

.

Slide10

DETAILED FINDINGS

Slide11

11

Awareness of

and Interest in Personalized Medicine

Slide12

Q7. How

closely do you follow news about health, health care, and the latest developments in medicine?

12

Most Americans say they follow developments in health, health care, and medicine.

Most U.S. adults (73%) say they follow developments in health and medicine. One out of five (21%) follow

very

closely.

73%

Slide13

Q8. Thinking about everything you have seen, heard and read lately, what medical advances or tools on the horizon have the most potential to positively change health care?

13

What people have heard about

medical advances or tools with potential to positively change health care

Advances in treatment of diseases

31%

Cancer cures, advances and/or treatment

15% Stem cell research to treat diseases4% Flu treatment or shots4%

New treatment/new medications/vaccines (non-specific)

3% Disease treatment (non-specific)2% HIV/AIDS treatments2%

Advances in technology and diagnostics

16%

Technology in medicine (non-specific)

6%

Artificial intelligence/robots/robot surgery

5%

Genetics

3%

DNA and genetic testing

2%

Personalized

medicine (3

people mentioned)

<1%

Other mentions

11%

Advancements in medicine (general)

5%

Alternate medicine/eating right/diet

3%

Medical marijuana

2%

Research is increasing (non-specific)

2%

Cost/insurance

6%

Affordable

health care/lowering

the cost of

health care

4%

Obamacare/elimination of Obamacare

2%

Other

3%

Yet, personalized medicine is not yet top-of-mind.

Unaided, only 3 people mentioned it.

“Possible

cures and inroads to curing cancer using targeting

therapies.”

“Robotics. The ability to utilize robots to perform medical procedures

.”

“I think that stem cell research and gene therapy show the greatest promise and potential to help

many,

many people.

Slide14

14

Q9.

Which of the following words or terms have you heard or read something about prior to today? Please select all that apply. *NOTE: In 2014, prior to the start of the

All of Us Research Program, respondents were only asked about personalized medicine, but not about precision medicine. In 2018, they were asked about both because both terms are now used interchangeably.

When asked specifically, 1 in 3 said they have heard of either personalized or precision medicine, or both.

More have heard the term personalized medicine (29%) than precision medicine (

15

%). There

has been little change in awareness since the previous survey conducted in 2014, when we measured 38% aware.* Heard the term personalized medicine and/or precision medicine:34% (Net)

Slide15

Q10. [IF HEARD OR READ SOMETHING ABOUT PERSONALIZED OR PRECISION MEDICINE]

What have you seen, heard or read about personalized medicine, sometimes referred to as precision medicine?

15

What

have you s

een

, heard or read about

personalized / precision medicine?

(unaided question)n=344Individualized treatment38% Targeted treatment; medicine tailored to treat your specific disease/need16% Individualized treatment; treating an individual person

15%

Genetic treatment/therapies based on your genes/based on genetics10% Treatment based on lifestyle1% Can target specific areas of body to prevent disease

1%

Other general comments

28%

Heard of it; have heard the term (general)

16%

Good medicine; better medicine (non-specific)

4%

Becoming more popular, on the upward swing/on the increase

3%

More effective; it works good

3%

Used for cancer treatment; for cancer patients

2%

Not sure

34%

Among those who have heard about personalized medicine, nearly a third cannot describe it.

“An

emerging approach for disease

treatment

and prevention that takes into account individual variability in genes, environment, and lifestyle for each person and differs from person to person according to their particular requirements and pre existing conditions

.”

“Advances in determining what the gene markers in DNA mean for health issues allows for individualized treatments possibly even down to resolving issues before they occur.”

Slide16

Q11. [IF HEARD OR READ SOMETHING ABOUT PERSONALIZED OR PRECISION MEDICINE]

Does this description match with what you thought personalized medicine or precision medicine was, or is this something different from what you had in mind?

16

Personalized medicine, sometimes referred to as precision medicine, is an emerging field that uses diagnostic tools to identify specific biological markers, often genetic, to help determine which medical treatments and procedures will be best for each patient. By combining this information with an individual's medical records and circumstances, p

ersonalized medicine

allows doctors and patients to develop targeted prevention and treatment plans. The goal is to provide the right treatment in the right dose to the right patient at the right time.

n=344 heard of personalized or precision medicine

When those who heard of

personalized medicine are shown a description, 3 in 4 confirm it is what they thought. Therefore, about 1 in 4 confirm they have heard about personalized medicine. Does this description match with what you thought personalized or precision medicine was, or is this something different from what you had in mind?26% of total

Slide17

Q14.

How well informed do you feel about personalized medicine?

17

Total

not

informed

53%

Total

informed47%37%63%In fact, only about 10% feel informed about personalized medicine. Most say they do not feel informed.Of all adults, just over half say they don’t feel informed about personalized medicine. Those who were familiar with it prior to the survey are more likely to feel somewhat or very informed. This is in line with what was seen in 2014.48%

49%

Slide18

Q12. What is your reaction to the description of personalized

medicine?* 2014 description was slightly different: Personalized medicine is an emerging field that uses diagnostic tools to identify specific biological markers, often genetic, to help determine which medical treatments and procedures will be best for each patient. By combining this information with an individual’s medical records and circumstances, personalized

medicine allows doctors and patients to develop targeted prevention and treatment plans. The goal is to provide the right treatment in the right dose to the right patient at the right time.

18

Two-thirds have a mostly positive reaction when they read the description about personalized medicine.

When shown the PMC description of personalized medicine (shown on page 15), most said they felt mostly positive about it. Nearly a third felt neutral, and only 1% felt negative. This reaction is unchanged from 2014.*

2014 results

%

Mostly positive65Neutral28Mostly negative2Don’t know/ref.5

Slide19

Q13. What are your reasons for that reaction? Please explain as clearly as possible.

19

Reasons for Positive Reactions about

Personalized Medicine

Personal appeal

41%

Positive/feel positive about it/sounds good (general)

20%

Helpful/helps people (non-specific)11% Better treatment/more efficient5%

Advanced treatment/advances in medicine/innovative3%

Makes sense/accurate2%Individualized treatment31%

Individual approach/determines what is best for individual patient/personalized (non-specific)

12%

Everyone is different/bodies react differently

6%

Right medication/give patient the exact medicine needed

5%

Targeted/targeted treatment

4%

Preventing health problems/prevent illness

3%

Genetic testing to target problems/genetic testing to find the right

treatment

3%

Positive feelings about personalized medicine relate to the appeal of an individualized approach.

“This

description pinpoints exactly how to treat a specific diagnosis of a patient, leading to more efficient

outcomes

in less time.”

“I

believe it will help by taking out a lot

of

the

guesswork

doctors do now. A

lot

of people have to

go back to the doctor

repeatedly

for new prescriptions until

they find one

that works.”

“All

bodies are different and one person's cure may not work for the next

.”

Slide20

* Percent based on all responses, not only neutral comments.

Q13. What are your reasons for that reaction? Please explain as clearly as possible.

20

Reasons for Neutral

or Negative Reactions to Personalized Medicine

General neutral mentions

16%*

Don't know enough about it/don't understand it/need more information

9% Might have some flaws/could have some issues/might work for some and not for others2% Indifferent/don't care either way 2%

Not proven/needs to be tested

1% That's how I feel (non-specific)1% Skeptical/sounds far fetched1%

Personal concerns

3%

Not safe/unnatural/don't trust the medical system

2%

Expensive/will run up costs

1%

Doesn't make sense/confusing

1%

Neutral reactions stem from feeling inadequately informed or wanting to know more. A few worry about safety.

I don't

know enough about it to make an informed judgement

.”

“It

sounds good, but who knows until it is

tested.”

“Sounds great but

expensive.”

Slide21

Q15.

How interested are you in learning more about how personalized medicine

can be used?

21

Total

not

interested

18%

Totalinterested82%Interest in personalized medicine is very high—and has grown 13 percentage points since 2014.Over eight in 10 American adults say they are interested in learning more about personalized medicine, up from seven in 10 in 2014.27%69%13 point increase

Slide22

Q32-38.

How interested are you in learning more about how personalized medicine

can be used in the following areas?

22

Total interested

90%

88%

88%

86%86%80%79%

There is

interest in learning more about personalized medicine applications across disease states.The most intense interest related to how personalized medicine can be used to treat cancer and prevent diseases.

Slide23

23

Total

very

interested

Men

Women

Age

18-34

Age 35-64Age

65+

Treating cancer67%

64%

69%

68%

65%

70%

Preventing

diseases/disorders

60%

57%

63%

63%

60%

55%

Treating

cardiovascular or heart disease

59%

56%

62%

57%

58%

65%

Treating

inherited disorders/diseases

55%

51%

59%

61%

55%

47%

Treating

infections

49%

46%

52%

49%

51%

46%

Treating

psychiatric or neurological disorders

49%

41%

56%

57%

48%

35%

Screening

parents who may be at risk of passing an inherited disorder/disease to their children

48%

43%

53%

57%

46%

39%

*

H

ighlighted cell indicates statistically significant difference between categories.

Q32-38.

How interested are you in learning more about how

p

ersonalized

medicine

can be used in the following areas?

Interests vary somewhat by gender and age.

Women show more intense interest than men in learning about the specific uses

of personalized medicine. Those age 65+ are most interested in how it can treat heart disease, whereas those 18-34 want to learn more about applications related to inherited and psychiatric disorders.

Slide24

24

Excitement and Worry around Personalized

Medicine

Slide25

Q22. Is there anything about

personalized medicine that you find particularly exciting or beneficial? What — and for what reasons — do you find that exciting or beneficial?

25

What is exciting or beneficial about personalized medicine?

Individualized treatment

31%

Treatment that would be best suited for me; the right treatment

,

no trial and error14% Preventive medicine—the ability to prevent, diagnose before onset of disease9%

Genetic testing/testing for specific disease that runs in my family6%

Targeted therapy/targeted treatment3% Individualized treatment/aimed at the individual3%

Effectiveness

17%

More effective and better treatments that work better

7%

Better health/healthier, will feel better

5%

Cures for diseases

3%

Live better, live longer

3%

Other

14%

All of it—everything sounds beneficial (general)

6%

Helpful/helps people (non-specific)

3%

New approach/new treatment

3%

Less side effects/decrease in side effects

1%

Affordable

health care/lowering

the cost of

health care

1%

Not sure

40%

Top-of-mind excitement about personalized medicine centers around individualized treatment and its potential to be more effective than current treatment approaches.

“I think it’s developing medicine to a new level and

serious

illnesses would be combatted in a more efficient

manner.”

“The fact that it is so specific is great. Doctors can see the root of the problem and fix it immediately with fewer

tests.”

Slide26

Q23-27.

How exciting would you say each of the following things about personalized medicine

are to you?

26

Total exciting

89%

88%

88%

87%85%When presented with a list of benefits, the vast majority say that all are exciting—and half or more say very

exciting.The most intense excitement is around prevention and early detection of disease.

Slide27

Q28-31.

For each of the following benefits of personalized medicine,

please indicate how much of a benefit it would be to you personally.

27The benefits of personalized medicine are clear to most—and most say these are MAJOR benefits.

Over two-thirds of respondents say each of the benefits would be

major,

with helping to avoid the trial-and-error process of finding effective treatments for patients being the most beneficial.

Slide28

28

Q28-31.

For each of the following benefits of

personalized medicine, please indicate how much of a benefit it would be to you personally.Those who have faced a life threatening illness themselves or in their family are most likely to see major benefits in avoiding a trial-and-error treatment process

and less invasive procedures.

Those who’ve never dealt with a life threatening illness themselves or in their family are somewhat less likely to see

major

benefits

than those who have.Total major benefitLife threatening illness: personally

Life threatening illness:

familyNeitherPersonalized medicine could help me avoid the trial-and-error process of finding which of several treatment options will work for me

70%

74%

74%

68%

Personalized

medicine could result in less invasive procedures

67%

66%

71%

65%

Personalized

medicine could help reduce or avoid treatment side effects

65%

68%

69%

63%

Personalized

medicine could shift the emphasis of my care from reaction to prevention of illness

64%

67%

67%

63%

Slide29

29

Q39.

Is there anything about

personalized medicine that is worrisome? If so, for what reasons do you find that worrisome? Just over 4 in 10 have top-of-mind worries about personalized medicine, but close to 6 in 10 do not.

Slide30

Q39. Is there anything about

personalized medicine that is worrisome? If so, for what reasons do you find that worrisome?

30

Worries Related to Personalized Medicine (unaided)

Safety/side

effects

12%

Side effects/if there are side effects

7% Safety/is it safe/risks (non-specific)5% Addiction/addiction if pills are used1%

Effectiveness/accuracy

8% Accuracy/diagnosis could be wrong6% Effectiveness/will it really work3%

Cost/coverage

8%

Cost/how much it costs/might be expensive

6%

Coverage/will health insurance pay for it/refusals

3%

Privacy

7%

Privacy/information kept private/genetic information getting into the wrong

hands

7%

Other concerns

10%

New/untested/not around long enough

4%

Don't know enough/don't have enough information (non-specific)

3%

All of it/everything is worrisome (general)

2%

Playing God/against God’s plan/meddling with nature

1%

Process/results concerns

5%

Terminal diagnosis/finding out about an incurable disease/will impact quality of life

4%

How it works/how it's done

1%

No worries

56%

The most common top-of-mind worries focus on safety, side effects, accuracy, and cost.

“How reliable is this technology, taking into consideration how new it is.”

“It worries

me that maybe it

wouldn’t

work

and

people would still end up with

side

effects

from medication.”

“It may be more expensive due to so much personalization

.”

Slide31

Q40-43

. Here are some reasons some people give for why they worry about personalized

medicine. For each one, please indicate how much of a concern it would be for you personally.

31

When presented with a list of specific worries, coverage and cost are top concerns.

The most intense concerns are around the test not being covered by insurance and not being able to afford it. Many also worry about denial of coverage.

2014: 69%

2014: 55%

Slide32

32

Q40-43

. Here

are some reasons some people give for why they worry about personalized medicine. For each one, please indicate how much of a concern it would be for you personally.Those in bad health and/or who have witnessed a life threatening illness are more intensely concerned than others.

Total

major

concern

Health status

Life threatening illness

Excellent/

very

good

Good

Fair/poor

Self

Family

Neither

The

test might not be covered by my insurer

62%

57%

63%

68%

73%

63%

60%

I

might not be able to afford a personalized approach to health care

59%

56%

58%

68%

68%

63%

56%

The

test could be used to deny coverage for a treatment I want

52%

48%

53%

58%

55%

57%

48%

Information

about my risk for developing a disease in the future could be used to deny long-term care or life insurance that I need

51%

47%

50%

58%

53%

55%

48%

Slide33

33

In considering a tradeoff between cost and coverage, most believe the value of personalized medicine outweighs the cost.

Because personalized tests and treatments are targeted to a small number of patients, they are sometimes more expensive than conventional tests and treatments. With that in mind, read these two statements. Of the two statements, which one is closest to your own personal opinion?

Personalized

tests and treatments deliver more value to patients and may help control overall health care spending by avoiding the trial-and-error process currently used to find a treatment that works for each patient. Therefore, health insurance companies should cover these tests and treatments

.

Personalized

medicine is promising, but health care costs are already high and some of these new tests and treatments are too expensive. In order to keep health care affordable, health insurance companies should not cover these personalized tests and treatments.

Slide34

34

Those more vulnerable to health issues are most likely to believe insurance should cover personalized medicine.

Total

Age

Life threatening illness

18-34

35-64

65+

Self

Family

Neither

Insurance should cover

67%

63%

66%

78%

71%

73%

64%

Insurance should

not

cover

33%

37%

34%

22%

29%

27%

36%

Q51. Because personalized tests and treatments are targeted to a small number of patients, they are sometimes more expensive than conventional tests and treatments. With that in mind, read these two statements. Of the two statements, which one is closest to your own personal opinion?

Adults 65 years and older and those who have witnessed a life threatening illness feel more strongly that insurance should cover personalized medicine than others.

Slide35

35

Experiences with and Perceptions of Genetic Testing

Slide36

If

your doctor recommended… Q18. a genetic test for use in developing a personalized plan for preventing illness or disease, how likely would you be to have the test? Q19

. a genetic test for use in developing a specific treatment plan for a disease you already have, how likely would you be to have the

test? Q20. a treatment for a disease informed by a genetic test, how likely would you be to accept your doctor's recommended treatment?36

Total

not

likely

16%

Totallikely84%12%88%13%

87%

If their doctor recommends it, most people say they are likely to use personalized medicine for preventing and treating disease.Over half say they would be very likely to use a genetic test to guide treatment for a disease they already have.

Slide37

Q21. If your doctor recommended a genetic test to develop a personalized prevention plan or treatment plan, what questions would you have about it? What would you like to have explained to you about

personalized medicine?

37

“The main thing that I would want to know is that it is safe with no bad side effects.”

Questions about a

personalized prevention/treatment plan

Process/how it works

41% How does it help—how it will benefit or affect me?14% How does it work—what will be going on?11% What treatment? How would a treatment plan work?

8%

How is it done—what is the procedure? Is it invasive?8% How long will it take—what time frame/length?5% What are we looking for? What does it show?

4%

Safety/side effects

20%

What are the side effects—are there any after effects?

14%

What are the safety/risks—are there any dangers?

7%

Effectiveness/accuracy

18%

Accuracy—how accurate is it? Can results be wrong?

12%

How effective is it—are you sure it works?

8%

Other questions

15%

Everything—I want everything explained (general)

8%

Why do I need this—why do it?

3%

Who sees the results—do the results remain private?

2%

What are the pros and cons?

2%

Cost/coverage

12%

Cost—how much will it cost?

9%

Will insurance/my insurance cover

it?

4%

Questions about personalized medicine center around how it works, safety, potential side effects, and how effective it is.

“How successful is it? What will the cost be? Does insurance cover some of the costs

?”

“I want to know how it helps in the long run. And, I want to know how it works

.”

Slide38

38

Q16. Has

your doctor or a medical provider ever talked with you about or recommended a genetic test to diagnose a disease or guide your treatment?

Only 1 in 10 patients have heard about genetic testing from their doctors—most have not.

More than 8 in 10 adults say their doctors have not talked about or recommended genetic tests to them in order to diagnose or guide treatment.

Slide39

Q17

. Below is a list of reasons people get personalized medicine tests. Have you personally ever gotten a genetic test for any of these purposes? Please select all that apply. [MULTIPLE RESPONSES ACCEPTED]

39

Just over 1 in 10 adults—particularly young adults—say they have gotten genetic tests for a variety of reasons.

While most (62%) Americans have not gotten a genetic test, those who have did so to prevent getting a disease (13%), to predict if a medicine might work for a disease they already have (12%), or to predict the likelihood they will get a specific disease in the future. Younger people (18-34) are significantly more likely than those age 65 or older to take part in genetic testing for any of these reasons.

Reasons for a Genetic Test

Slide40

40

Q44. Have

you ever heard of genetic counseling

?Q45. [ASK IF HEARD OF GENETIC COUNSELING Q44] Have you ever spoken to a genetic counselor?

Most Americans are unfamiliar with genetic counseling, and of those who are familiar, most have not spoken to a genetic counselor.

While less than one in five (17%) have heard of genetic counseling, nearly a quarter of those adults who are familiar have spoken to a genetic counselor. Despite so few having heard of genetic counseling, 21% of women (vs. 13% of men) have heard of it.

IF heard of genetic

counseling

(n=172)

Slide41

41

Q46.

Have you ever purchased an at-home DNA test to check for your risk of developing certain diseases

?Fewer than 1 in 10 adults say they have purchased an at-home DNA test, but millennials

are leading the way.

Six percent (6%) of adults have purchased an at-home DNA test to check their risk of developing certain diseases. However, 10% of millennials have purchased an at-home DNA test, the most of any generation.

have

Slide42

42

Q47

. How much, if anything, would you be willing to pay out of pocket to have your whole genome sequenced today?

Thanks to recent technological developments, scientists are now capable of sequencing all of a person's DNA. This is called whole genome sequencing. Some of the data from whole genome sequencing can provide information you and your doctor can use to develop personalized treatment and prevention plans, and scientists hope that the rest of the data may tell us more about a person as we learn more about how the human body functions in the future.

Most are willing to pay at least something for genome sequencing—particularly Gen X or younger.

Seventy percent of adults are willing to pay for genome sequencing, with most willing to pay up to $50 (27%) or $100 (25%). Asians (88%) are significantly more willing to pay than any other group and Gen Xers or younger are more willing than Baby Boomers or older generations.

Slide43

43

Attitudes Around Genetic Testing Public Policies

Slide44

44

The Genetic Information Nondiscrimination Act made it illegal for employers or health insurers to ask for genetic test results when making employment or coverage decisions.

Q48.

Prior to reading this, were you aware of the Genetic Information Nondiscrimination Act [GINA]?

Q49. Does GINA make you more or less comfortable with genetic testing?

Knowing about GINA makes one-third of Americans feel more comfortable with genetic testing.

While most (84%) adults are unaware of GINA, nearly one-third (31%) are more comfortable with genetic testing because of it. However, 43% say GINA makes no difference in their comfort level. 18-34 year olds, while more likely to say they were aware of GINA than other age groups, were also more likely to say that it made them less comfortable with genetic testing.

Slide45

45

The

All of

Us

Research Program [formerly the Precision Medicine Initiative] is an effort by the federal government to gather data from at least one million people living in the United States that can be used to accelerate progress in p

ersonalized medicine

research.

Q50. Prior

to reading this, were you aware of the federal government’s All of Us™ Research Program?Most adults are unaware of the All of Us Research Program. Younger adults tend to be the most aware.Only 9% of adults are aware of the All of Us Research Program. 18-34 year olds (14%) are more aware than older counterparts.aware

Slide46

Q52-55. Here

is a list of possible outcomes that might come about as a result of different policy choices related to personalized medicine.

For each one, indicate how acceptable that outcome would be for you.

46

Total acceptable

88%

83%

37%

32%Americans want more information and lower costs when it comes to personalized medicine.Americans like the idea of having more information available to doctors and lower out of pocket costs, but find higher out of pocket costs and government control unacceptable.

Slide47

APPENDIX

Slide48

Demographics

48

Gender

%

Male

49

Female

51

Region

%

Northeast

18

Midwest

22

South

37

West

23

Generation

%

Gen Z

8

Millennials

30

Gen X

27

Baby

Boomers

32

Silent/Greatest

4

Education

%

Not college grad

70

College grad

30

Race/Ethnicity

%

White

61

Hispanic

18

Black/African American

12

Asian

6

American Indian/Alaska

Native

1

Native Hawaiian or other Pacific Islander

-

Other

1

Political Party

%

Democrat

39

Republican

35

Independent

15

Income

%

Less than $45,000

44

More than $45,000

50

Slide49

KRC Research Team

49

Dylan Luper

Senior Research Analyst

KRC

Research

733 10

th

St. NW202-585-2909 (direct)dluper@krcresearch.comwww.krcresearch.com@krcresearch | #krcfindings

Our insight. Your breakthrough.

Katie SnedikerResearch ManagerKRC Research909 Third Avenue212-445-8037 (direct)ksnediker@krcresearch.comwww.krcresearch.com@krcresearch | #krcfindings

Our insight. Your breakthrough.

Mark David Richards

Senior Vice President

KRC

Research

733 10

th

St. NW

202-230-8767(direct)

mrichards@krcresearch.com

www.krcresearch.com

@krcresearch | #

krcfindings

Our insight. Your breakthrough.


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