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The Challenges of Discipline and Creating Community  in a
The Challenges of Discipline and Creating Community  in a

The Challenges of Discipline and Creating Community in a - PowerPoint Presentation

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Diverse Classroom PRESENTOR James Skinner North Vancouver School District February 20 2015 SEVEN STEPS SEVEN STEPS TO CHANGING BEHAVIOUR The basic principles of student behaviour Observing the behaviour ID: 540361 Download Presentation

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Presentation on theme: "The Challenges of Discipline and Creating Community in a"— Presentation transcript

Slide1

The Challenges of Discipline and Creating Community in a Diverse Classroom

PRESENTOR: James Skinner

North Vancouver School District February

20, 2015Slide2

SEVEN STEPS

SEVEN STEPS TO CHANGING BEHAVIOUR

The basic principles of student behaviour

Observing the behaviour

Identifying the Goal of Misbehaviour

Encouragement

Developing a plan/Implementing the plan

Evaluating the Plan

Back to the Drawing boardSlide3

STEP ONE: A SHORT HISTORY OF CHILDHOOD

»

The technology, religion and childhood

»

A shorter history of Adolescence

»

New York 1949

»

The Growth of Democracy, woman’s rights etc.Slide4

Adler and Dreikur’s Democratic Contributions

We are social beings and we all choose to belong,

Belonging means:

FEELING WORTHWHILE

and

SIGNIFICANT

We believe in Equality and Mutual Respect

We are Goal Oriented

We are Creative Beings. WE

CHOOSE

OUR BEHAVIOUR

We have a holistic view of people

We inherit ‘

Social Interest

’ that needs to be nurtured!Slide5

BELONGING

In the words of Alfred Adler, "

We all choose to belong

In the words of Daniel Siegel, “

We are hard wired to belong

.”

“The brain is a social organ, grows and changes when it interacts with other brains.” -

Dr. Nancy Graham

Adlerian’s believe that every child is born with the need to belong.As children we are ‘dwarfs amongst giants’ and feel inferior. ‘Inferiority’ is a belief that runs counter to that of ‘belonging’. We then make up a ‘story/fictive dream’ of what we believe will help us belong, and strive to achieve that mistaken belief. Slide6

THE VERTICAL VERSUS THE HORIZONALSlide7

THE MOVE FROM THE FICTIVE DREAM TO SOCIAL INTEREST

Social Interest:

The

capacity

to care for the

cares of others.

The development of feeling part of a community

Adler’s insight to untangle oneself from this fictive dream requires the fictive condition and a redirection of one’s emotional attention

towards the social interest. Slide8

Perceptions

I

wouldn

t have seen it

If I hadn’t believed it!Slide9

Family Constellations

One of the

biggest influences

on a child’s perception of themselves is their psychological position in their family.Slide10

OLDEST CHILD

Be first

Is a leader, Is helpful and responsible, and selective about whom to please

Bossy

Believes they

MUST

please others

Becomes discouraged if can’t be the best

(becomes the best at being the worst)Slide11

SECOND CHILD

Catch up

or overtake

Is sociable

Puts forth effort

Develops abilities lacking in oldest

May rebel

Can become the ‘bad’ child if oldest is the ‘good’ child

Is uncertain of abilities if oldest child is successfulSlide12

MIDDLE CHILD OF THREE

Make life fair

Is adaptable

Concerned with justice

Knows how to get along with all kinds of people

Feels squeezed- may push others down to elevate self

May be problem child, feels doesn’t have placeSlide13

YOUNGEST CHILD

Gets Service

Knows how to influence others

Is charming and friendly

May be manipulative

Expects other to take care of her or his responsibilities

Feels inferior or overtakes older siblingsSlide14

THE FOUR LIFE TASKS

WORK= SCHOOL

: How satisfied are you with your work?

FRIENDSHIPS = PEERS

: How satisfied are you with your friendships and community life?

LOVE RELATIONSHIPS = PARENTS/SIBLINGS/BOYFRIEND/GIRLFRIEND

: How much satisfaction do you have with your intimate relationships?

SELF DEVELOPMENT

=

INSIGHT, SPIRITUALITYSlide15

Social Interest is:

“Community feeling” or the “Capacity to Care about the Cares of Others” Slide16

ADLER SAYS:

“The purpose of life is not perfection but

wholeness

”Slide17

The Encouraging Classroom:THE 3 C’S

C

ONNECTED

C

ONTRIBUTING

C

APABLE Slide18

THE TWO USUAL WAYS WE RUIN CHILDREN:

NEGLECT AND PAMPERING

1.

Neglect:

I

n it’s extreme is abuse

»

Not being present to the child. » Causing physical or emotional harm/trauma.2. Pampering: Doing for the child what the child should be doing for themselves. Slide19

PAMPERING (Continued)

Over-protection

:

Fear of life, over estimates the dangers, “Don’t run you’ll fall.”

Symptoms

: Do not have regular social contact, lonely, overly dependent on the company of adults.

Over Permissive

:

Pleases self without regard for others. Not exposed to frustration, pressures others into their service.

Symptoms: makes excuses, tyrannical, charm, door-mat parent.Slide20

GROWING RESILIENT CHILDREN

Resilient kids bend but don’t break, like willows

Have strong feelings of self-regard: ‘learned optimism’, “ I can do it

,

” “I am a good person.”

Have developed systematic cooperative problem solving skills.

Children who have the ability to recognize and describe their feelings

and

show empathy for others.Teachers/Parents who show warmth and understanding who consciously teach their children the above mentioned positive attitudes and skills.Slide21

The Purpose of Behaviour

The question is not what caused the behaviour but what is the

purpose

of the behaviour?Slide22

THE VERTICAL VERSUS THE HORIZONALSlide23

The HorizontalSlide24

THE FOUR TASKS OF LIFE

W

ORK

=

SCHOOL

F

RIENDSHIP

=

PEERS

LOVE RELATIONSHIPS = FAMILY (TEENS:Girl/Boy RELATIONSHIPS)

S

ELF DEVELOPMENT = INSIGHT, SPIRITUALITYSlide25

The Horizontal: From “Me” to ‘We’

Human’s are

social

creatures. We have the ability to care for each other if developed.Slide26

Changing BehaviourSTEP

TWO

Observe the behaviour:

What is the student’s behaviour?

No judgments please!

Video view

How

often

is this behaviour happening?

When is this behaviour happening?Slide27

What is the Goal of the Student’s Behaviour?

What is the student

doing

?

What is the student’s

response

to your direction?

What is the feeling you have towards the student: annoyance, anger, frustration, hurt, sadness, hopelessness?

Decide on the goalSlide28

Understanding Student Behaviour

Students choose their behavior.

If a student feels they can’t achieve the goal of belonging in a useful way, they will choose a useless way.

Students misbehaviour is for one of the following four Goals:

1.

Attention

-active/passive

2. Power – active/passive 3. Revenge – active/passive 4. Assumed Disability - passiveSlide29

Active Attention: The Pest

»

Teacher feels annoyed:

Student’s mistaken belief, “I only belong when I am being noticed.”

»

Teacher’s

intervention:

Ignore, give agreed attention, catch them being usefulSlide30

Passive Attention

Teacher annoyed: coaxing, reminding, prodding

Student: lazy, forgetful

Intervention produces start – stop

behaviour

Solution:

Agree on the amount of attentionSlide31

Interventions for Attention

Ignore the behaviour

Give “The Eye”

Mention students name while teaching

Send a secret signal

Give an “I-Message”

Lower your voice, change your voice

Talk to the wall

Ask a favour, or a direct question

Send student to the thinking chair

writeSlide32

Active Power Goal

Teacher Feels: Angry, threatened

Student thinks: “

I only belong when I am in control, the boss.”

Teacher Response: Leads to power struggle

Student Response: Escalates the power struggle.

Intervention:

Give

c

hoices, leadership and adult type roles in the class and schoolSlide33

Passive Power

Teacher feels:

frustrated, underlying anger.

Teacher intervention: Continues useless

behaviour

.

Student Response:

Ignores or politely says “yes” and continues useless behaviour.

Intervention

: Gives choice to student. Gives child adult type tasks. Leadership roles.Slide34

Goal of Revenge

Teacher feels: hurt, angry or sad.

Teacher’s Response: To express anger, hurt and want to hurt back.

Child Response: to continue to do hurtful things, like bullying, destroying things that are important to others.

Intervention:

Avoid retaliation, befriend, build trust. Give them opportunities to help others who are struggling.Slide35

Passive Revenge

Teacher Feeling: To feel sorry or sad.

Teacher Intervention: to show sympathy. Make allowances for the child out of feeling sorry.

Child’s mistaken thought:

“Life is not fair, no one really likes me.”

Child: Continues to feel sorry self, get hurt by self or others.

Intervention:

Don’t feel sorry. Hold the child accountable. Be firm and kind at the same time.Slide36

Interventions for Power and Revenge

Acknowledge the student’s power

Remove the audience

Make a date

Change the subject

Time-out in the classroom

Time-out in another classroom

Time-out in the office

Time-out in the homeSlide37

Interventions for Power and Revenge (Cont’d)

Loss or delay of activity

Loss or delay of using objects or equipment

Loss or delay of access to school areas

Denied interactions with other students

Required interaction with school personal

Required interaction with parents

Required interaction with police

Restitution: Repair or Replacement of objectsSlide38

Displaying Inadequacy

Teacher Feels: Hopeless like giving up

Student thinks:

“I am helpless.

” and feels like giving up.

Teacher Intervention: Provides extra help, the student seems to understand today but has unlearned tomorrow.

Intervention

: Don’t give up. Break the task into smaller doable pieces, chart their progress.Slide39

Interventions with Display of Inadequacy

Modify instructional material

Provide tutoring

Teach positive self-talk

Make mistakes okay by focusing on effort

Build confidence by focusing on improvement

Focus on past successes

Make learning tangibleSlide40

STEP THREE: Encouragement

“A misbehaving child is a discouraged child.”

Rudolph Driekurs

Slide41

Encouragement

CHILDREN

NEED

ENCOURAGMENT

THE WAY PLANTS NEED

WATER” Rudolf Dreikurs Slide42

Praise versus Encouragement

PRAISE ENCOURAGEMENT

____________________________________________________-_________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________

Focus on

external control

- Focus on child’s ability to

manage

life constructively

Focus on external - Internal evaluationSelf-worth base on others’ opinions “Good Work” “Great Student” - Self-evaluation: "We do you think about your work?”

Child learns to

conform

or rebel - Person learns

courage

to be imperfect

Focus on

self elevation,

personal gain, assets - contribution,

appreciation

Slide43

Methods of Encouragement

Focus on strengths and abilities

Acknowledge effort and improvements

Make every effort to eliminate criticism

Accept the student’s feelings. Truly listen to students

Recognize contributions

Show faith in the child

Encourage the child to self-assessSlide44

Methods of Encouragement Cont’d

Don’t feel sorry for the child

Don’t praise the child

Avoid bribery to control

Instill “The Courage to be imperfect.”

Look for opportunities to develop empathy

Don’t be to helpful, but provide scaffolding to assist

Teach kids to ‘care about the cares of others.’Slide45

Daniel Siegel says:

“ The brain in each life situation decides whether the situation is safe or dangerous. If the situation is dangerous it will trigger a fight, flight or freeze mode. This inhibits learning.”

“If the situation is deemed safe, the safety mechanism is triggered (love without fear) which allows the student to sustain focus.”Slide46

Making the Classroom Psychologically Safe by:

Helping each student set realistic goals

Reducing competition and increasing cooperation

Engaging students in developing the courtesies and procedures in the classroom through Classroom meetings.

Teaching children about consequences removing rewards and punishment.

Provide opportunities for each student to

C

ontribute,

C

onnect, and feel Capable.Slide47

Strategies for Community Making in the Classroom

Sociograms

Cooperative Learning Activities (Cooperative Learning by Johnson and Johnson)

Student evaluation of their own work and group work

Classroom Meetings: classroom procedures, classroom art, quizzes, classroom rules.

Student mentoring and tutoring

Making the classroom a safe place. (Reduce competition, increase cooperation)Slide48

STEP FOUR: Consequences

Two Kinds of Consequences:

Natural

: result of things taking there natural course

“If I don’t eat, then I will be hungry”

2.

Logical:

human intervention in the creation of

the consequence.

“If your work is late, you will lose 2% per day, as we agreed”Slide49

Consequences (cont’d)

The consequence for the misbehaviour should be known ahead of time.

The consequence should take place as soon as possible.

Consequences should be of short duration.

The more class members that participate in planning the consequences the better!Slide50

Consequences (cont’d)

Consequences entail action (consequences that can be handled with no dialogue at all well usually be most effective).

Choice induces cooperation when an arbitrary punishment would incite hostility and rebellion

Unless the teacher apply consequences consistently they will be ineffective.Slide51

What makes a consequence effective is not the severity but the

surety

of the consequence.Slide52

The Test for Consequences

1. Is it

REASONABLE

?

2. Is it

RELATED

?

3. Is it RESPECTFUL? 4. Can it be RELIABLY Enforced?Slide53

Cooperative Discipline Steps

The student is asked to stop the misbehaviour

The student is given a choice to stop or go to the back seat in the room.

If behaviour continues, the student is directed to the back seat.

If the behaviour continues, then the student is asked to go to the study booth in the room

If the behaviour continues the student is directed to the leave to a designated room. The Who SquadSlide54

COOPERATIVE DISCIPLINE ACTION PLAN

Name of student_____________ Date ______

Step 1: Pinpoint & Describe behaviour. _____________________________________________________________________________________________________________________

Step 2: Identify the goal of the misbehaviour.

______________________________________________________________________________Slide55

COOPERATIVE DISCIPLINE ACTION PLAN

Step 3: Choose intervention techniques.

______________________________________________________________________________

Step 4: Select Encouragement Techniques.

Capable: ____________________________

_______________________________________

Connect: ________________________________

________________________________________

Contribute: ______________________________

________________________________________Slide56

Parents as Partners

Phone call: Date ________

Parent Response ___ Send School Action Plan

____ Schedule conference

Conference: Date: ___________

_____Parent-teacher ___Parent-Teacher-Student

Others attending ___________________________

Parent Suggestions ________________________

Student suggestions ____________________________

Suggestions of other participants ____________________Home Action Plan developed? ___Yes ___NoFollow-up Conferences _______________________________ Slide57

STEP FIVE: Evaluation of Intervention

Is the behaviour changing?

»

Is the behavior staying same? If so, back to the drawing board.

Probably miss-diagnosis of the Goal of Misbehavior

.

»

Is the

behaviour getting worse?» Is the behaviour getting more cooperative?Slide58

Review: Making the Classroom Psychologically Safe by:

Helping each student set

realistic goals

Reducing

competition and increasing cooperation

Engaging students in the developing the courtesies and procedures in the classroom through Classroom meetings.

Teaching children about consequences removing rewards and punishment.

Provide opportunities for each student to Contribute, Connect, and feel Capable.Slide59

ENCOURAGEMENT

ENCOURAGEMENT

: is the total acceptance of the person as they are, regardless of their lack of skills and ability.

“Children need encouragement the same way a plant needs water.”

Rudolph DreikursSlide60

The Seven Connecting Habits:

Caring

Trusting

Listening

Supporting

Negotiating

Befriending

Encouraging

William GlasserSlide61

Acknowledgements:

\

These dedicated Adlerian Educator’s have laid a solid foundation for Education in the 21

st

Century:

Rudolph Dreikurs, Don Dinkmeyer, Gary McKay, Ray Corsini, Edna Nash, Linda Albert, Frances Jovick

and Klaus Spiekerman.Slide62

A DIALOGUE

Here is were we have a discussion about the ideas in this presentation.

Questions are useful!