Basic Narration Types English III || D. Glen Smith, Instructor

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Basic Narration Types English III || D. Glen Smith, Instructor




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Presentations text content in Basic Narration Types English III || D. Glen Smith, Instructor

Slide1

Basic Narration Types

English III || D. Glen Smith, Instructor

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Slide2

Definitions

Narration

—the account of the plot; the series of events described to the reader.

English III || D. Glen Smith, Instructor

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Definitions

Narration

—the account of the plot; the series of events described to the reader.

First Person

Third Person

Omniscient Third Person

Limited Omniscient Third Person

Stream of Consciousness

English III || D. Glen Smith, Instructor

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Definitions

Narration

—the account of the plot; the series of events described to the reader.

Third Person

: The narrator acts as an unseen character; does not participate in the action of the plot, but does relate details hidden from actors in the story.

Reports information objectively or subjectively

English III || D. Glen Smith, Instructor

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Definitions

Third Person

|| from

Aesop’s Fables

A fox one day fell into a deep well and could find no means of escape. A Goat, overcome with thirst, came to the same well, and seeing the Fox, inquired if the water was good. Concealing his sad plight under a merry guise, the Fox indulged in a lavish praise of the water, saying it was excellent beyond measure, and encouraging him to descend. The Goat, mindful only of his thirst, thoughtlessly jumped down, but just as he drank, the Fox informed him of the difficulty they were both in and suggested a scheme for their common escape…

(full fable: http://fablesofaesop.com/the-fox-and-the-goat.html)

English III || D. Glen Smith, Instructor

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Slide6

Definitions

Narration

—the account of the plot; the series of events described to the reader.

First Person

: The narrator participates in the action of the plot. Reports information from his/her point of view and therefore is a biased source of information.

Readers need to determine quickly if a first person narration is reliable.

For obvious reasons, Poe loves this style.

English III || D. Glen Smith, Instructor

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Definitions

First Person

|| from

Hound of the Baskervilles

Mr. Sherlock Holmes, who was usually very late in the mornings, save upon those not infrequent occasions when he was up all night, was seated at the breakfast table. I stood upon the hearth-rug and picked up the stick which our visitor had left behind him the night before. It was a fine, thick piece of wood, bulbous-headed, of the sort which is known as a “Penang lawyer.” Just under the head was a broad silver band nearly an inch across. “To James Mortimer, M.R.C.S., from his friends of the C.C.H.,” was engraved upon it, with the date “1884.” It was just such a stick as the old-fashioned family practitioner used to carry—dignified, solid, and reassuring.

(full text:

https://www.gutenberg.org/files/2852/2852-h/2852-h.htm)

English III || D. Glen Smith, Instructor

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Slide8

Definitions

Narration

—the account of the plot; the series of events described to the reader.

Omniscient Third Person

: The narrator knows

everything

about

all

characters and relates the thoughts and motivations of all actors in the plot. When a new character in introduced to a scene, the reader learns his/her motivation and desires.

English III || D. Glen Smith, Instructor

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Definitions

Omniscient Third Person

|| “Where is Here”

For years they had lived without incident in their house in a quiet residential neighborhood when, one November evening at dusk, the doorbell rang, and the father went to answer it, and there on his doorstep stood a man he had never seen before. The stranger apologized for disturbing him at what was probably the dinner hour and explained that he’d once lived in the house— “I mean,

I was a child in this house…”

English III || D. Glen Smith, Instructor

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Slide10

Definitions

Narration

—the account of the plot; the series of events described to the reader.

Limited Omniscient Third Person

:

The narrator’s knowledge focuses on only one character, major or minor; the narrator reveals everything about this character’s thoughts and motivations—

but only this one character.

English III || D. Glen Smith, Instructor

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Definitions

Limited Omniscient Third Person

||

“The Story of an Hour”

She arose at length and opened the door to her sister's importunities. There was a feverish triumph in her eyes, and she carried herself unwittingly like a goddess of Victory. She clasped her sister's waist, and together they descended the stairs. Richards stood waiting for them at the bottom.

English III || D. Glen Smith, Instructor

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Slide12

Definitions

Narration

—the account of the plot; the series of events described to the reader.

Stream of Consciousness

:

The story is told through the replication process of the narrator’s thoughts.

Best described as

interior monologues

, this form of narration copies the internal voice of character’s mind as he/she goes about his/her daily life.

English III || D. Glen Smith, Instructor

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Definitions

Stream of Consciousness

||

Ulysses

Didn't look back when she was going down the strand. Wouldn't give that satisfaction. Those girls, those girls, those lovely seaside girls. Fine eyes she had, clear. It's the white of the eye brings that out not so much the pupil. Did she know what I? Course. Like a cat sitting beyond a dog's jump. Women never meet one like that Wilkins in the high school drawing a picture of Venus with all his belongings on show. Call that innocence? Poor idiot! His wife has her work cut out for her. Never see them sit on a bench marked 

Wet Paint

. Eyes all over them.

(full text: https://www.gutenberg.org/files/4300/4300-h/4300-h.htm)

English III || D. Glen Smith, Instructor

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