Virtual Reality (VR) By Morgan Moore PowerPoint Presentation

Virtual Reality (VR)  By Morgan Moore PowerPoint Presentation

2018-09-23 5K 5 0 0

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Bus 550 Professor Chen. WHAT IS VIRTUAL REALITY ??. Virtual reality. (. VR. ) is a . computer. technology that uses . virtual reality headsets. or multi-projected environments, sometimes in combination with physical environments or props, to generate realistic images, sounds and other sensations.... ID: 676697

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Presentations text content in Virtual Reality (VR) By Morgan Moore

Slide1

Virtual Reality (VR)

By Morgan Moore

Bus 550 Professor Chen

Slide2

WHAT IS VIRTUAL REALITY ??

Virtual reality

(

VR

) is a

computer

technology that uses

virtual reality headsets

or multi-projected environments, sometimes in combination with physical environments or props, to generate realistic images, sounds and other sensations that simulate a user's physical presence in a virtual or imaginary environment.

People can “look around” the artificial world

People can move around in it, and interact with virtual features

Effects created by VR headset, display, with screen in front of eyes or through a specially designed room with big screens

Slide3

Panoramic paintings

T

he

earliest attempt at virtual reality is surely the 360-degree murals (or panoramic paintings) from the nineteenth century. These paintings were intended to fill the viewer’s entire field of vision, making them feel present at some historical event or scene.

History of Virtual Reality

Slide4

1838 – Stereoscopic photos & viewers

In

1838 Charles Wheatstone’s research demonstrated that the brain processes the different two-dimensional images from each eye into a single object of three dimensions. Viewing two side by side stereoscopic images or photos through a stereoscope gave the user a sense of depth and immersion.

The

later development of the popular View-Master stereoscope (patented 1939), was used for “virtual tourism”. The design principles of the Stereoscope is used today for the popular Google Cardboard and low budget VR head mounted displays for mobile phones.

Slide5

Slide6

1929 – Link Trainer The First Flight Simulator

In

1929 Edward Link created the “Link trainer” (patented 1931) probably the first example of a commercial flight simulator, which was entirely electromechanical. It was controlled by motors that linked to the rudder and steering column to modify the pitch and roll. A small motor-driven device mimicked turbulence and disturbances. Such was the need for safer ways to train

pilots.

During

World War II over 10,000 “blue box” Link Trainers were used by over 500,000 pilots for initial training and improving their skills.

Slide7

Slide8

1950s – Morton Heilig’s Sensorama

In

the mid 1950s cinematographer Morton Heilig developed the Sensorama (patented 1962) which was an arcade-style theatre cabinet that would stimulate all the senses, not just sight and sound.

It

featured stereo speakers, a stereoscopic 3D display, fans, smell generators and a vibrating chair. The Sensorama was intended to fully immerse the individual in the film.

He also created six short films for his invention all of which he shot, produced and edited himself. The Sensorama films were titled, Motorcycle, Belly Dancer, Dune Buggy, helicopter, A date with Sabina and I’m a coca cola bottle!

Slide9

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History

1960- The first VR Head Mounted Display

1961- Head sight- first motion tracking HMD

1965 – The ultimate display by Ivan Sutherland

1968- The Sword of Damocles

1969- Artificial Reality1987- “Virtual Reality”- The official name was born1991- Virtuality Group Arcade Machines

Slide11

More History…

1992- The Lawnmower man

1993- Sega new VR glasses

1995- Nintendo – Virtual Boy

1999- The Matrix

2011- Palmer Luckey develops the Oculous Rift, inexpensive homemade HMD, in parents garage2014- Facebook announces its acquisition of Oculus in a deal worth 2 billion.

Slide12

Slide13

Slide14

Types of Virtual Reality

Fully Immersive

Non- Immersive

Collaborative

Web-Based

Augmented Realty

Slide15

Fully Immersive

Slide16

Non-Immersive

Slide17

Collaborative VR

Slide18

Web Based Virtual Reality

https://mozvr.com/

Slide19

Augmented Reality

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=VMBvJ4MTXzc

Augmented reality

(AR) is a live direct or indirect view of a physical, real-world environment whose elements are "

augmented

" by computer-generated or extracted real-world sensory input such as sound, video, graphics, haptics or GPS data.

Slide20

More A.R.

Heads up Display Helmet

https://

www.youtube.com/watch?v=Vkhp8Z1IloQ

Slide21

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Virtual reality allows the user to be immersed into a virtual world, unlike regular screens in front of the user which do not allow for such an experience. VR can include 4 of the 5 senses, including vision, hearing, touch and possibly even smell. With this power, VR can

people

for a virtual world fairly

easily.

V

irtual reality tricks your brain into believing you are in a 3D world. The first way VR does this is with the stereoscopic display. This works by displaying two slightly different angles of the scene to each eye, simulating depth. This along with other ways to simulate depth like parallax (farther objects to you seem to move slower), shading and techniques create an almost life like experience.

How it works:

Slide23

Stereoscopic D

isplay

Slide24

Continued….

VR systems that include transmission of vibrations and other sensations to the user through a

game controller

or other devices are known as

haptic

systems. This tactile information is generally known as force feedback in medical, video gaming and military training applications.

Virtual

reality also refers to remote communication environments which provide a virtual presence of users with through

telepresence

and

telexistence

or the use of a

virtual artifact

(VA).

The

immersive environment can be similar to the real world in order to create a

lifelike experience

grounded in reality or sci-fi.

Augmented reality

systems may also be considered a form of VR that layers virtual information over a live camera feed into a headset, or through a

smartphone

or tablet device.

Slide25

Slide26

Slide27

Field of view is the extent of the visible world that can be seen at any given time. For example, humans have about a 180 degree FOV while looking straight ahead, and 270 degrees with eye movement.

The

human eye is very good at noticing vision imperfections, with tunnel vision being an example of such a phenomena. Even if a VR headset had a 180 degree FOV, you may still be able to tell a difference.

The

Vive and Rift

- 110 degree FOVs, Cardboard- 90, GearVR has 96

Daydream

may have as much as 120. This should, generally speaking, greatly affect the VR experience and could make or break a certain headset for people, not to mention any health issues that we will get into later

.

Not meeting an acceptable frame rate, FOV or latency can cause motion sickness.

Field of View

Slide28

Slide29

Potential Benefits

Job Training- Military, Medical Field, Aviation, Construction, etc. etc.

Rehabilitation – Stroke Patients, Children, Disabled – Helps them overcome fears, helps with stress, depression too.

Business- Real Estate companies using VR to sell/modify homes

(Virtual Open Houses)

Slide30

Slide31

More Benefits

Entertainment -

Red Bull Media

House (VR) virtual

reality

platform. It replicates some of the most exhilarating outdoor experiences for fans, including cliff diving, skiing, helicopter aerobatics and urban exploration.VR – Cinema- VR cinema is filmed on a static camera that can record in 360 degrees

Virtual and Travel Experiences- allowing

you to experience being there without really going there. VR travel apps can both help you experience a place—or a specific resort, city, museum, hotel or cruise ship—before you take the plunge.

Or you can

experience a place vicariously.

Education programs,

Storytelling, Museum Visits-

The Arlington Science Focus School in Arlington, VA is

using the Oculus Rift to take their students on virtual field trips

to places like the

Smithsonian Museum

Tour of the Solar System, Google Expeditions, Jurassic Age Virtual Reality

Slide32

Slide33

Ted Talks – John Vechey

https

://

www.youtube.com/watch?v=IJf7BfpKTOY

Our future world with Virtual Reality

CofounderPluto VRJanuary 2015 – Present (2 years 11 months)Cofounder of Augmented and Virtual Reality start up Pluto VR.

Slide34

Potential Risks

Disengagement with the real world / VR replacing reality

People preferring VR to reality

Addiction to VR

Difficulty distinguishing between virtual and real, “false realities in VR”

Psychological Damage - Identity problems

Possible physical damage to human body – VR induced

n

ausea or motion sickness, tripping over wires, eye damage from screens.

Slide35

Social Implications

Psychological And Social

Implications:

The concerns voiced by doctors of Philosophy Michael Madary and Thomas Metzinger are very real. According to reports, their team believes that the immersive technology of virtual reality may have long-term effects on those who consume VR content.

Relaxation and Escapism, affects motivation in the real world.

Rob people of time on earth, create large dopamine boosts, people will become desensitized to normal pleasures

Slide36

Stanford Study

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=1E_Ndt9kssg

Slide37

Database Design

Slide38

Questions?

Comments ?

Questions?

Concerns?

Input?

Slide39

Trivia

How does Virtual Reality trick your brain into believing you are in a 3D world? This process

works by displaying two slightly different angles of the scene to each eye, simulating

depth.

A) Field of View Display

B) Stereoscopic DisplayC) Haptic SystemsD) Telepresense

Slide40

What is one potential negative consequences of Virtual Reality?

A) Force Feedback

B) Rehabilitation

C) Escapism

D) Virtual Reality Platform

Slide41

Which of the following is not one of the types of Virtual Reality?

A) Non-Immersive

B) Oculus Rift

C) Augmented Reality

D)Fully Immersive


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