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Keeping Children Safe in Early Care and Education Settings
Keeping Children Safe in Early Care and Education Settings

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Introduction to Safety and Injury Prevention in Early Care and Education Settings Keeping Children Safe From Injuries in Early Care and Education Settings Welcome Date Location PRESENTER INFORMATION HERE ID: 673063 Download Presentation

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Slide1

Keeping Children Safe in Early Care and Education Settings

Introduction to Safety and Injury Prevention in Early Care and Education Settings Slide2

Keeping Children Safe From Injuriesin Early Care and Education Settings

WelcomeDateLocationPRESENTER INFORMATION HERESlide3

Learning ObjectivesState most common injuries in early care and education

Recognize safety hazardsPrevent most common injuriesKnow requirements for injury reportingPartner effectively with communitySlide4

“If a disease were killing our children in the proportions that injuries are, people would be outraged and demand that this killer be stopped.”C. Everett Koop, MD

Former US Surgeon GeneralSlide5

Injury Deaths Compared With Other Leading Causes of Death for People Ages 1 – 44, United States, 2013

http://www.cdc.gov/injury/overview/leading_cod.htmlSlide6

InjurySlide7

Injuries Among Children

Leading cause of death and disability10% of injuries in preschoolers happen in an early care and education settingsNot accidentsPreventable and predictableSlide8

Safe Kids USASlide9

The Early Care and Education Provider

Relationship with family and childModel safety for children and familiesSlide10

Caring For Our Children Standards

Caring for Our Children: National Health and Safety Performance Standards—Guidelines for Early Care and Education Programs3rd editionAvailable at http://cfoc.nrckids.org (free download and purchase options)Slide11

InjuriesPediatric first aid kit Pediatric CPR and first aid training

Communication device for emergencies (911)Document and notify parents and state licensing agencyReport serious injuries to appropriate authoritiesSlide12

CASE PRESENTATIONSlide13

Case Presentation: Bobby3-year-old boy on playground

Phone ringsYou turn away and answer itBobby starts cryingHe fell off slide onto pavementSlide14

Case Presentation: BobbyWhat do you do next?

What could have prevented this?How should you document and report any injuries?Slide15

Case Presentation: BobbyWhat do you do next?

Make sure child is alertCheck for injuriesGive first aid, if neededSlide16

Case Presentation: BobbyPreventing future incidents and injuries

Ensure adequate supervisionLimit distractions (eg, cell phones)Never leave children unattendedMake sure shock-absorbing surface is under equipment Slide17

Case Presentation: BobbyReporting and Documentation

Use a standard reporting form and provide detailsCall parentsDiscuss how to prevent this from happening againSlide18

Pre QuizWhat is the most common injury among children age 0-5?

Broken bonesFallsChokingburnsSlide19

Pre QuizWhat is the most common preventable cause of death for children ages 1-4?

BurnsChokingDrowningBicycle accidentsGetting hit by a carSlide20

Pre QuizIs there a requirement to report injuries?

YesNoSlide21

Pre QuizWhere do the majority of infant drowning deaths occur?

PoolsPonds/LakesFalling off a boatBathtubs/BucketsSlide22

Pre QuizWhat object is associated with the highest rate of death from choking?

GrapesHotdogsLatex BalloonsMarblesCoinsSlide23

Preventable Injury Preventable Injuries are:Unintentional (not on purpose)

Not accidentsMore common among childrenSlide24

Preventable Injury These injuries can be prevented by:Creating/maintaining safe areas

Providing adult supervision at all timesKeeping maximum child:staff ratioSlide25

Types of Preventable Injuries Falls from playground equipmentIngestions/Poisonings

DrowningsBurnsMotor vehicle accidentsSuffocationInjuries from wheeled toysSlide26

Causes of Nonfatal Injuries in Young Children Most common nonfatal injuries seen in the ER in young children

Falls50% of injuries in children <1 yearStruck by or against an objectAnimal bites/insect stingsSlide27

Causes of Fatal Injuries in Children Main cause of death for children

Ages 1-4: DrowningUnder age 1: Suffocation (while sleeping) or strangulation Boys vs. GirlsBoys are twice as likely to have an injury-related death than girlsSlide28

RECOGNIZING and preventing SAFETY HAZARDSSlide29

Safety/Injury Hazards General Physical EnvironmentElevated surfaces (steps, stairs, stage)

Strangulation (straps, strings)Furniture (can tip over)Sharp corners or pointsElectrical outletsProtruding nails/bolts/other small objectsUnsafe sleeping environmentsSlide30

Safety/Injury Hazards Prevention of these hazards

Put gates at stairwaysRemove straps/stringsSecure furnitureCover sharp cornersInstall tamper-resistant electrical outlets/outlet coversSlide31

Choking Choking rates highest among infants140 per 100,000

Risk decreases with age90% of choking in children under 4 years of ageObjects less than 1.5 inches in diameter have higher choking riskSlide32

Common Choking HazardsLatex BalloonsLeading cause of choking death

Round or Cylinder shapesHigh Risk FoodsHot dogs, hard candy, peanuts, seeds, whole grapes, popcorn, marshmallows, gumSlide33

Choking SignsInhaled objects or foodCoughing

DroolingTrouble breathing/noisy breathingTurning blueIngested objects or foodDroolingVomitingAbdominal pain/refusal to eatSlide34

Choking PreventionCut food in small pieces¼ inch or smaller (infants)

½ inch or smaller (toddlers)Avoid high risk foods (children under 5)Children should be seated while eating (no playing/running)Supervise children Check toys for small, loose piecesKeep magnets/batteries away from childrenSlide35

Most Common Fall/Crush HazardsTelevisionsBookcasesFurniture and dressers

Stairs with poorly installed gatesUnlocked windowsHeavy objects on shelvesSlide36

Fall/Crush Hazard - Televisions

Every 3 weeks, a child dies from a television tipping overOver past 10 years, a child visited the ER every 45 minutes for injury related to a TV tipping over36-inch TV falling 3 feet = 1-year-old falling 10 storiesSlide37

Injuries from Falls/CrushesBroken bones

Skull/brain injuries (can be life threatening)ConcussionsSlide38

Preventing Fall/Crush HazardsSecure televisions (to wall or on stable table) Secure heavy furniture (bookshelves) with brackets, braces, or wall straps

Keep heavier items on lower shelvesDon’t place items high – children will want to climb for them (eg, toys)Slide39

Preventing Fall/Crush HazardsKeep windows lockedUse approved safety gates (top and bottom of stairs)

Strap babies and young children in high chairs, strollers, and swingsNever leave children unattendedAdult supervision Slide40

Water SafetyBathtubs or Large BucketsMajority of infant drowning deaths

Swimming Pools Most common place for drownings of 1-4 year oldsSlide41

Drowning PreventionALWAYS supervise children Make sure pools are fenced in with gates/latches

Avoid distractions (eg, reading, talking)Be aware of hazards (even in shallow water)Close bathroom doors and toilet lids Never leave a child alone in a bathtubSlide42

INJURY TRAINING FOR EARLY CARE AND EDUCATION PROVIDERSSlide43

Training Requirements for Providers Early Care and Education Providers must have pediatric first aid and CPR trainingValid certificate is requiredSlide44

Training Requirements for Providers Early Care and Education Providers must:Have pre-service training in health management

recognize signs of illnessKnow about infectious disease preventionKnow about safety/injury hazardsHave knowledge about safe sleep practices (infants)Reducing SIDS riskPreventing shaken baby syndromeSlide45

REPORTING INJURIESSlide46

Legal Reporting/Documentation RequirementsNotify parent/guardian immediately if:

Injury or illness required first aid or medical attentionChild is lost or missing, fire, or closure of the centerDocument notification of parent/guardian and law enforcementKnow and follow state notification regulationsSlide47

Documentation RequirementsAn incident report form should be completed (Appendices CC and DD in Caring for Our Children)Injuries that need to be reported include:

Child maltreatmentBites FallsIngestionsSlide48

Documentation RequirementsComplete 3 copies of injury report formParent/Guardian

Child’s folder at the CenterInjury log bookKeep based on state regulationsSend copy to state licensing agency if medical attention requiredSlide49

Corrective ActionThe center should take action based on logs

Adjusting schedulesRemoving or limiting use of equipmentRelocating equipment or furnishingsIncreasing supervisionReview forms regularly for injury trends/patternsSlide50

Partnering with the CommunityCommunity Resources for child safety information

Safe Kids Worldwide (www.safekids.org)National/Local organizationsOffers classes and eventsHealthy Children (www.healthychildren.org)Educational articles and videosSupported by the AAPSlide51

Post QuizWhat is the most common injury among children age 0-5?

Broken bonesFallsChokingburnsSlide52

Post QuizWhat is the most common injury among children age 0-5?

Broken bonesFallsChokingburnsSlide53

Post QuizWhat is the most common preventable cause of death for children ages 1-4?

BurnsChokingDrowningBicycle accidentsGetting hit by a carSlide54

Post QuizWhat is the most common preventable cause of death for children ages 1-4?

BurnsChokingDrowningBicycle accidentsGetting hit by a carSlide55

Post QuizIs there a requirement to report injuries?

YesNoSlide56

Post QuizIs there a requirement to report injuries?

YesNoSlide57

Post QuizWhere do the majority of infant drowning deaths occur?

PoolsPonds/LakesFalling off a boatBathtubs/BucketsSlide58

Post QuizWhere do the majority of infant drowning deaths occur?

PoolsPonds/LakesFalling off a boatBathtubs/BucketsSlide59

Post QuizWhat object is associated with the highest rate of death from choking?

GrapesHotdogsLatex BalloonsMarblesCoinsSlide60

Post QuizWhat object is associated with the highest rate of death from choking?

GrapesHotdogsLatex BalloonsMarblesCoinsSlide61

SAFETY AND INJURY PREVENTION TOPIC HIGHLIGHTSSlide62

Insert slides from the other 5 modules hereMedication Safety and Poison Prevention

Playground SafetyHelmet SafetyTransportation SafetyBurn/Fire PreventionSlide63

ResourcesSafe Kids Worldwide – www.safekids.org

Healthy Children – www.healthychildren.orgCenters for Disease Control and Preventionwww.cdc.gov/safechild Slide64

AcknowledgmentsThis curriculum has been developed by the American Academy of Pediatrics (AAP). The authors and contributors are expert authorities in the field of pediatrics.

The recommendations in this curriculum do not indicate an exclusive course of treatment or serve as a standard of medical care. Variations, taking into account individual circumstances, may be appropriate. Listing of resources does not imply an endorsement by the AAP. The AAP is not responsible for the content of resources mentioned in this curriculum. Website addresses are as current as possible but may change at any time. Support for the Heathy Futures curricula has been provided through funding from Johnson & Johnson Consumer Inc.Slide65

AcknowledgmentsProject Advisor

Andrew N. Hashikawa, MD, MS, FAAP –AAP Early Childhood Champion (Michigan)University of Michigan Injury Center (Assistant Professor) Curriculum Content ConsultantAmy Teddy – Child Safety & Injury Prevention Expert (University of Michigan)Steering CommitteeDanette Glassy, MD, FAAP AAP Council on Early Childhood MemberNancy Topping-Tailby, MSW, LICSW National Center on Early Childhood Health & WellnessSusan Pollack, MD, FAAP

AAP Committee, Section, Council Reviewers

Council on Early Childhood

Council on Injury, Violence, and Poison Prevention

Disaster Preparedness Advisory CouncilSlide66

Copyright InformationCopyright©2016 American Academy of Pediatrics. All rights reserved. Specific permission is granted to duplicate this curriculum for distribution to child care providers for educational, noncommercial purposes.

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