Total resource need for technology  crore US  million of which spending for RD in ater technologies
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Total resource need for technology crore US million of which spending for RD in ater technologies

81 Security 142 Drugs pharmaceuticals 469 Climate change pr ogramme 1564 Solar energy r esearch initiative 313 Nano science and technology mission 782 Focus RD in 12th Five Year Plan 20122017 Starting ambitiously this GE RD centre has grown to more

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Total resource need for technology crore US million of which spending for RD in ater technologies




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Total resource need for technology 6,395 crore (US$ 1035 million) of which spending for R&D in ater technologies: 2.81% Security: 1.42% Drugs & pharmaceuticals: 4.69% Climate change pr ogramme: 15.64% Solar energy r esearch initiative: 3.13% Nano science and technology mission: 7.82% Focus R&D in 12th Five Year Plan (2012–2017) Starting ambitiously, this (GE R&D) centre has grown to more than 1,000 Ph.D level scientists supporting a whole range of activities of GE globally. — Professor Sowmyanarayanan Sadagopan Director, IIIT Bangalore "being Bangalored" to indicate the

flight of jobs away from USA. The Karnataka state government christened Bengaluru as the “IT capital of India”. Bengaluru as a city has played an important role in the IT success story of India. What is not that widely known is the fact that Bengaluru in the past 15 years has also played a key role in getting the R&D capability of India to centre stage. Many feel that R&D too is "software", largely cognitive work. Establishment of Indian Institute of Science, a century ago in 1909, did the seeding of science in India. The Nobel Prize winner in Physics, Dr C V Raman, largely worked in

Incr easing investment in R&D in public and private sector to 2 per cent of GDP Higher allocation to scientic research Setting up new institutions for science and educational r esearch Cr eating centres of excellence and facilities in emerging and frontline areas in academic and national institutes Str engthening infrastructure for R&D in universities Encouraging public-private R&D partnerships Grants for industrial R&D projects Government of India Initiatives in R&D Source: FICCI-Battelle Knowledge Paper Global R&D Summit 2013 proposed by the late management guru C K Prahalad; a low

cost ultrasound machine for medical diagnostics, and a low cost baby warmer are examples. Some of these ideas though relevant to emerging markets like India, have relevance to parts of global markets as well. Buoyed by the success of GE, a range of MNCs set up their R&D wings in India. These include IBM Research, HP Labs, Intel Research, Microsoft Research, Xerox Research, GM Research, Siemens Corporate Research, ABB Research, Schneider, Samsung R&D, SAP Labs, Mercedes-Benz Research, Nokia Research, Sony, Yokogawa, Canon Research, Motorola Research, Yahoo Labs, Google Labs, Facebook, LinkedIn,

etc. Over the past decade, a number of critical innovations have come out of these labs, largely inspired by "frugal innovation". Multi-mouse from Microsoft Research, Motofone from Motorola, low cost Asha handset series from Nokia and Spoken Web from IBM, are often quoted as stellar examples of frugal innovation driving such R&D initiatives (Rishikesh Krishnan in his book From Jugaad to Systematic Innovation ). The entry of MNCs like IBM, HP, Intel, Sun, Microsoft, Oracle or SAP is largely driven by cost arbitrage provided by the local manpower and its abundance (more than a million graduate

engineers trained in IT are produced in India each year, as per media reports), R&D has to be value driven and needs high-quality workforce, typically with master’s and doctoral degrees. This had been the main weakness in the Indian setup with Ph.D production at a very low level. For example, when Microsoft Research started its India operations, the number of students graduating with a Ph.D in Computer Science was just a handful; consequently, they were forced to hire recent Ph.D graduates (often of Indian origin) from USA. Fortunately, things have improved considerably and the Ph.D production

in Computer Science in India has reached 26 DECEMBER-JANUARY 2014 | www.ibef.org Bengaluru. With several premier science institutes like National Centre for Biological Sciences (NCBS) and science-centred organisations like Indian Space Research Organisation (ISRO) whose Mangalyaan (Mars Mission) is currently under way, Bengaluru is the science capital of India as well. The real impetus for industrial R&D, and that too with significant global impact, happened when GE chose to start their R&D centre in Bengaluru in the year 2000. Starting ambitiously, this centre has grown to more than 1,000

Ph.D level scientists supporting a whole range of activities of GE globally. Christened John F Welch Technology Centre, it has focussed on the idea of bottom of the pyramid originally