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Mental Health is Public Health: Tools for State and Local Partners During COVID-19
Mental Health is Public Health: Tools for State and Local Partners During COVID-19

Mental Health is Public Health: Tools for State and Local Partners During COVID-19 - PowerPoint Presentation

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  1 CAPT Elissa Meites MD MPH Chief Editor CDC COVID19 Science Update Office of the Chief Medical Officer Dr Debra Houry MD MPH Acting Principal Deputy Director Ms Ahoua Kone MPH ID: 906151 Download

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Presentation on theme: "Mental Health is Public Health: Tools for State and Local Partners During COVID-19"— Presentation transcript

Slide1

Mental Health is Public Health: Tools for State and Local Partners During COVID-19 

1

CAPT Elissa Meites, MD, MPH

Chief Editor, CDC COVID-19 Science Update

Office of the Chief Medical Officer

Dr. Debra Houry, MD, MPH

Acting Principal Deputy Director

Ms. Ahoua Kone, MPH

Behavioral Scientist

Caryn Murillo, MPH

Deputy for Partnerships

 

and Risk Management

(Moderator)

                       

 August 23, 2021

Slide2

Agenda

Introduction Update on COVID-19Presentation on CDC's Work on Mental Health

Presentation on Mental Health Tools for State and Local Public Health WorkersQ&A from emails received​Closing​

Subscribe to get future call announcements:

https://www.cdc.gov/coronavirus/2019ncov/communication/videos/partner-calls/

This call will be recorded and archived on cdc.gov and on YouTube. 

   

Search: "cdc partner call" or "cdc youtube partner call“Q&A:  We collect, sort and prep for questions prior to the call so we can answer as many as possible  

Notes

2

Slide3

CDC.gov Resources

COVID Data Tracker Weekly Review includes state and territory data on reported cases, variants, testing, vaccinations, hospitalizations, and deaths. 

COVID Data Tracker Weekly Review | CDC

Updated webpage with new information on the Delta variant and the updated guidance. Delta Variant: What We Know About the Science | CDC

On August 11, 2021, CDC strengthened its recommendation for all people 12 years and older, including people who are pregnant, breastfeeding, trying to get pregnant now, or might become pregnant in the future. COVID-19 Vaccines During Pregnancy

3

Slide4

Updates on COVID-19

Elissa Meites, MD, MPHCAPT, USPHS

Editor, COVID-19 Science UpdateOffice of the Chief Medical OfficerCDC COVID-19 Emergency Response

4

Slide5

COVID-19 Situational Update

Global deaths

Cumulative deaths: 4,424,341United States deaths

Cumulative deaths: 625,375Average this week (last 7 days):

738/dayAverage last week (previous 7 days): 600/day 23% increase in deaths over previous 7 days

Global cases

Cumulative cases: 

211,373,303

United States cases

Cumulative cases: 37,583,545Average this week (last 7 days):137,188/day

Average last week (previous 7 days): 122,769/day

12% increase in cases over previous 7 days5

Source of U.S. information:

https://covid.cdc.gov/covid-data-tracker

Source of global information:

https://covid19.who.int

This information current as of August 23, 2021.

Global​ vaccinations

Cumulative vaccine doses: 

4,615,260,567

United States​ vaccinations

Cumulative vaccine doses:

362,657,771

People who received ≥1 dose: 

201,425,785

People who are fully vaccinated:

170,821,621

60.7% of people received ≥1 dose ​

51.5% of people are fully vaccinated​

Slide6

COVID-19 Science Updates

6

Sustained Effectiveness of Pfizer-BioNTech and Moderna Vaccines Against COVID-19-Associated Hospitalizations Among Adults — United States, March–July 2021. Tenforde

et al

. MMWR (August 18, 2021). Vaccine effectiveness (VE) against hospitalization was 86% during the first 2–12 weeks post-vaccination, and 84% during the next 12 weeks.  

VE was 90% for people without immunocompromising conditions.  

VE was only 63% for people with immunocompromising conditions.

 

CDC now recommends that people whose immune systems are moderately to severely compromised should receive an additional dose of mRNA COVID-19 vaccine, at least 4 weeks after their 2

nd dose, for a total of 3 doses.  

Slide7

COVID-19 Science Updates

7

New COVID-19 Cases and Hospitalizations Among Adults, by Vaccination Status — New York, May 3–July 25, 2021. Rosenberg

et al.

MMWR (August 18, 2021).Vaccine effectiveness (VE) against hospitalization was >90%, but VE against infection declined from 92% to 80% during May–July.  

Decline in VE against infection in adults coincides with rapid increase in the Delta variant, and relaxation of masking and physical distancing recommendations.  

Factors driving the apparent changes in VE were uncertain. 

Increased viral load of the Delta variant might underpin its increased transmissibility and could potentially lead to reduced vaccine-induced protection against infection. 

Slide8

COVID-19 Science Updates

8

Effectiveness of Pfizer-BioNTech and Moderna Vaccines in Preventing SARS-CoV-2 Infection Among Nursing Home Residents Before and After Widespread Circulation of the SARS-CoV-2 B.1.617.2 (Delta) Variant — National Healthcare Safety Network, March 1–August 1, 2021. Nanduri

et al

. MMWR (August 18, 2021).Among nursing home residents, pre-Delta (March–May) vaccine effectiveness (VE) against infection was 75%.

VE against infection declined to 53% during the Delta period (June–July). 

Lower VE could be caused by waning immunity, reduced protection against the Delta variant, or both.  

Vaccination of nursing home residents, as well as staff members and visitors, should be prioritized.

A potential need for another vaccine dose exists among populations at risk of severe COVID-19. 

Slide9

Mental Health is Public Health: Tools for State and Local Partners During COVID-19

Dr. Debra Houry, MD, MPHActing Principal Deputy DirectorCDC

9

Slide10

Slide11

Mental Health Data 

Questionnaire* Modules include:

Health Related Quality of Life (Healthy Days/Frequent Mental Distress)

Bereavement

Caregiving

ACEs

SDOH and Reactions to Race 

*Crosswalk with demographics (e.g., 

race, ethnicity, income, sexual 

orientation, gender identity) and other core questions

Household

Pulse Survey

11

Slide12

Suicide: A Mental Health and Public Health Problem

 

12

Contributors beyond

mental health

Strengthen Economic Supports

Strengthen access to and delivery of suicide care

Create protective environments

Promote connectedness

Teach coping and problem-solving skills

Identify and support people at risk

Lessen harms and prevent future risk

Strategies to Prevent Suicide

Note: Suicide decedents may have had multiple circumstances associated with suicide, so percentages will add to more than 100.

Source: CDC Vital Signs, 2018,

https://www.cdc.gov/vitalsigns/suicide/index.html

Slide13

13

Slide14

Evidence-based, partner-driven, multi-media campaign for audiences disproportionately affected by COVID-19 and mental health challenges during the pandemic. 

 

Campaign Results

Total campaign reach:

437,312,529

Information seeking increased and was highest in

May 2021

Reached audiences most in need

: People experiencing violence, economic distress, and communities of color

Audience had 1.6x higher odds of reporting overall stress or

stress and discord in the family

Audience had 2.2x higher odds of reporting mental health information seeking

Campaign effects: Increased

resiliency

, increased use of

self-care

strategies, and increased

community engagement

How Right Now

Most common emotions experienced

Grief

among English speakers

Fear

among 

Spanish speakers

14

Slide15

15

Slide16

Mental Health Resources for Public Health Workers

Ahoua Kone, MPH Behavioral ScientistCenter for Global Health CDC

16

Slide17

Strain of COVID-19 on Public Health Workforce

17

Slide18

Symptoms of Mental Health Conditions Among Public Health Workers, March-April, 2021

26,174 survey responses

53% reported symptoms of at least 1 mental health condition in the previous 2 weeks

37% reported symptoms of post-traumatic stress disorder

8% reported suicidal thoughts

18

Slide19

Supporting PHWs Mental Health

Address work practices that contribute to stress and trauma

Destigmatize requests for mental health assistance

Make employee assistance programs accessible and acceptable

Build awareness of symptoms of mental health conditions & develop sustainable coping strategies

19

Slide20

Sample State Mental Health ResourcesMichigan Stay Well Program

Virtual support groups Mental wellness webinars Behavioral health guides Delaware Division of Public HealthMental health resources Mental health check-in

20

Slide21

Sample State Mental Health ResourcesWashington State Department of Health

Behavioral health resources and recommendations “Coping with COVID” podcast and blogSelf-care resourcesCOVID-19 guidance for building resilience in the workplace COVID-19 guidance for maintaining healthy incident management and emergency response teams

21

Slide22

Federal Resources

CDC resources CDC mental health and suicide prevention strategies pages Mental health resources specific to public health and health professionalsMental health in the workplace Substance Abuse & Mental Health Services Administration (SAMHSA)Crisis counseling assistance and training programs

22

Slide23

Supporting Public Health Workers

Organizations: Explore best practices and measures for staff support, such asReasonable workloadRecognition for achievementsTime offEmployee Assistance Program

Individuals: Explore positive coping mechanisms and stress management, such asSupport from family/friends, co-workersMeditationExerciseNature

23

Slide24

Q&A with Panelist

Notes

This call will be recorded and archived on

cdc.gov

and on YouTube.      

    Search

:

"

cdc partner call"

or

"cdc YouTube partner call“

24

CAPT Elissa Meites

Chief Editor, CDC COVID-19 Science Update

Office of the Chief Medical Officer, CDC COVID-19 Emergency Response

Dr. Debra Houry, MD, MPH

Acting Principal Deputy Director

CDC

Ms. Ahoua Kone, MPH

Behavioral Scientist

Center for Global Health, CDC

Slide25

Subscribe for future calls: 

https://www.cdc.gov/coronavirus/2019-ncov/communication/videos/partner-calls/

The recording will be posted on cdc.gov and CDC's YouTube channel. 

*Search "cdc partner call" or "

cdc

 

youtube

 partner call"