Unions Rebel against second-class status - PowerPoint Presentation

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Unions Rebel against second-class status
Unions Rebel against second-class status

Unions Rebel against second-class status - Description


When Lou Cammarosano started teaching in 1956 members of the profession barely met secondclass citizen status Forget having any preparation time Teachers did not have time off for lunch Principals could call a meeting at any time in the morning or evening and to keep your job yo ID: 266060 Download Presentation

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Unions Rebel against second-class status

When

Lou Cammarosano started teaching in 1956, members of the profession barely met second-class citizen status. "Forget having any preparation time. Teachers did not have time off for lunch. Principals could call a meeting at any time in the morning or evening and, to keep your job, you had to go," said Cammarosano, who taught for 40 years in the Harrison district in Westchester County. "We were to be seen and not heard."Slide3

Original Unions

NYSTA – an NEA affiliate

United Teachers of NY – an AFT affiliateThomas Hobart

Al

ShankerSlide4

Unions Merge

NYSTA and UTNY agree to merge creating a new union

NYSUT.Part of the agreement was to disaffiliate with the NEA.Slide5

NEA NY

NEA set up a rival organization in NYS but it did not grow like NYSUTSlide6

NYSUT Grows

NYSUT membership continues to grow as it looks to organize

professionals in and out of the field of education.SRPs – School Related ProfessionalsUUP – United University ProfesorsSchool NursesSlide7

NEA Merger

Reunited

In 2006 NEA NY and NYSUT agree to mergeNYSUT agrees to affiliate with the NEASlide8

Challenges

When NYSUT was formed in the early 1970s, the political climate was treacherous for teachers.

A three-year freeze in state aid led to severe budget cuts. Striking teachers were being jeered and jailed; the Legislature had imposed a 2-for-1 pay loss penalty and one-year probation for striking public employees.In 1970, the state Legislature overwhelmingly approved a bill freezing district budgets and teaching salaries in those districts defeating school budgets.Slide9

Wake-up Call

Although Gov. Rockefeller vetoed the bill because it negated teachers' rights under the Taylor Law, it was a preview of things to come. In 1971, the Legislature approved the

Jerabek bills - which jumped teachers' probation to five years, abolished the minimum salary law, mandated urinalysis testing and prohibited school districts from granting sabbatical leaves to teachers.For many, that was the wake-up call for a radical idea: political actionSlide10

VOTE-COPE

NYSTS –

VOTE: Voice of Teachers in EducationUTNY – COPE: Committee on Political EducationBoth political arms were funded by voluntary contributions - not dues - and both supported voter registration drives and pro-education candidates in local and state elections.Slide11

VOTE-COPE

VOTE/COPE

makes NYSUT one of

the most powerful political forces

in the state of

New York.Slide12

NYSUT’s Accomplishments

In 1975, passage of a law guaranteeing tenure transfer rights and a maximum two-year probation period for teachers who switched districts

In 1977, a law providing for significantly enhanced enforcement powers for the state Public Employment Relations BoardIn1978, repeal of the Taylor Law's mandatory penalty of one year's probation for any public employee who went on strike.In1982, the state legislature passed the

Triborough

Amendment

to the Taylor Law. The

Triborough

Amendment required school districts to honor the entire contract until a new agreement was reached

Permanent annual COLA in TRS & ERS pensionsPension Equity –

a half-dozen early retirement incentives; pension supplementation and health insurance protection for

retirees.

Creation

of teacher centers (1984) and the mentor-intern program (1986

)Slide13

VOTE-COPE

provides

rebates to locals

Of all the VOTE/COPE monies collected

:

20%

gets rebated for

local assistance programsSlide14

Rebates may

be used for:

School Budget Vote

Campaigns

Support Candidates

for

Local School Board

General local union

political action activities

(voter registration, voter education, etc.) Slide15

A VOTE-COPE

contribution to fit all budgets…Based on payroll deduction over 26 paychecks

Per Paycheck

Total Contribution

$2.00

* $

52.00

*

$4.00

$

104.00

$5.00

$130.00

$6.00

$156.00

*New TeachersSlide16

Don’t be the

weak link…

Support our political action fund.

Donate to

VOTE/COPE

Shom More....
By: sherrill-nordquist
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