Engaging the media through social media

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Engaging the media through social media




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Presentations text content in Engaging the media through social media

Slide1

Engaging the media through social media

Jason PohlJuly 15, 2016

Slide2

Where we’re going

Introductions

How

it used to be

Why it’s better now

How journalists do journalism

How journalists use social media

How (good) PR folks use social media

The practice

Misperceptions and solutions

Questions

?

Slide3

About Me

Slide4

About You

Name

Department/organization

Explain your most memorable (good or bad) experience trying to pitch a story to a news organization? How did social media use factor into that experience?

Slide5

How it used to be (and why it’s better now)

P

ress

releases

 N

ews organization

 (Some) people (might) see it.

Slow

Less interactive

Difficult to control your message

Difficult to see to what extent the messaging was working

Limited audience

Slide6

How Media approach things today

Story generation

Facts, round-ups

Social

Reader-based

Immediate

REACH!

RESULTS!

Slide7

News values

ImpactTimelinessProminenceProximityUnusualConflictCurrency Human interest

Slide8

How journalists use SOCIAL MEDIA

News gathering toolTwitter alerts (breaking)Reciprocal connection with community Personality and branding Article sharingSelf promotionWhat the community is talking about

Slide9

How I collect and share news

INTERACTION.

Slide10

Personality and branding

How I use use social media

Slide11

How you can use social media to:

Share thoughts/events/other news items that are interestingResearch what else is happening in the fieldNetwork with other people (journalists) interested in similar fieldsVoice, brand, and control of your message

Slide12

Different ways to conceptualize this

Social Mediated

C

risis

C

ommunication

T

heory

Situational Crisis Communication Theory

Image Repair Theory, uses and gratification, credibility, among others

Implications for public relations, crisis communications, journalism, emergency management, community planning, sociology, risk assessment, linguistics

HAVE A PLAN AND KNOW WHY YOU HAVE THAT PLAN

Slide13

Social Mediated Crisis Communication MOdel

Distinguishes among multiple publics

Social media content creators

Social media followers

Social media inactives

Five primary factors that dictate how an organization will and should communicate

Crisis origin

Crisis type

Organizations infrastructure

Crisis message form

Crisis message source

Slide14

Blog-mediated crisis Communication model

Slide15

Social Mediated Crisis Communication Model

Slide16

Put another way

Slide17

So what?

Increasing amount of research offering very real

solutions

for what crisis communicators and planners should be doing (Veil et al., 2011)

Establish risk and crisis management policies and process approaches

Plan

pre-event

logistics

Partner

with the

public

L

isten

to the public’s concerns and understand the

audience

C

ommunicate

with honesty, candor and

openness

Collaborate

and coordinate with credible

sources

M

eet

the needs of the (traditional) media and remain

accessible

Communicate

with compassion, concern, and

empathy

A

ccept

uncertainty and

ambiguity

P

rovide

messages of self-

efficacy

Slide18

What this looks like in practice…

Slide19

What this looks like in practice…

“We can have conversations with the citizens, and they with one another, in a public forum for all to see. Through this type of dialog you start to understand your community and what is important to them,” a practitioner told the authors. “That is invaluable.” —JeffCO folks discussing integrated media plan and the incident management team

Slide20

Cut through the misinformation

Slide21

Ongoing challenges

DO NOT ABANDON TRADITIONAL CHANNELS. PERIOD.

Scoops and exclusivity

Twitter is not just a 140-character press release

Make people care about the other stuff

Have a plan and actually use it. If policy says ONLY info will be posted on Twitter, make sure that’s the case – and make sure your local media know that.

IT MUST BE TWO-WAY

If there’s an error, CORRECT IT. Though not ideal, media often will run with the tweets as an “official” source, so PROOF IT.

Slide22

The demise of journalists? No way.

The long and short of it is that there is no replacement for face-to-face

contact

and

any chief or commander or PIO who thinks they can replace that with social media is making a grave mistake.

Media STILL have greater reach

Major breaking: Tens of thousands of engaged minutes

Pageviews

, go-to source for information

Daily engagement and seen as the go-to source for information

http://www.poynter.org/2011/with-social-media-police-and-reporters-grapple-over-control-of-message/134489

/

Slide23

Remember this?

Impact

Timeliness

Prominence

Proximity

Unusual

Conflict

Currency

Human interest

Personality, reliability, frequency, value

Slide24

Misperceptions and reasons for failure

“I don’t have time to troll Facebook/Twitter/LinkedIn/

Instagram

.”

The other time excuse: “I’m posting 9-5 and nobody is paying attention.”

“Nobody will see this when there’s so much going on all the time.”

“I tagged the

hashtag

to get more likes on my stream account profile.”

“I need to get this tweet approved and my boss is away.”

INCONSISTENCY

Slide25

@BPGlobalPR

Slide26

@BPGlobalPR

Slide27

@BPGlobalPR

Slide28

Questions?

Jason Pohl

Public safety journalist

Fort Collins Coloradoan

Twitter: @

pohl_jason

Cell: 970-222-5929

Email:

JasonPohl@coloradoan.com

Slide29

References

Benoit, W. L. (1995).

Accounts, excuses, and apologies: A theory of image restoration

strategies

.

Albany, NY: State University of New York Press.

Benoit, W. L. (1997). Image repair discourse and crisis communication.

Public Relations

Review

,

23(2), 177-186.

Coombs, T. W. (2007). Crisis and risk communication special section introduction.

Public

Relations

Review,

33, 117.

Coombs, T. W. (2015). What equivocality teaches us about crisis communication.

Journal of

Contingencies

and Crisis Management.

23(3), 125-128.

Hughes, A. L. (2012). The evolving role of the public information officer: An examination of

social

media in emergency management.

Journal of Homeland Security and Emergency Management,

9(1), 1-22.

Liu, B. F., Jin, Y.,

Briones

, R.,

Kuch

, B. (2012). Managing turbulence in the blogosphere:

Evaluating

the blog-mediated crisis communication model with the American Red Cross.

Journal of Public Relations Research,

24, 353-370.

Wan, S.,

Koh

, R.,

Ong

, A., Pang, A. (2015). Parody social media accounts: Influence an impact

on

organizations during crisis.

Public Relations Review,

41, 381-385.


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