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Aggression is all the rage
Aggression is all the rage

Aggression is all the rage - PowerPoint Presentation

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Aggression is all the rage - Description

Men are becoming more aggressive in the sporting arena according to a new report Up to 77 of all men believe modernday society is more aggressive today than it was 10 years ago As professional sport becomes more competitive scenes of fisticuffs and tantrums are becoming a regular occurr ID: 540567 Download Presentation

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Presentation on theme: "Aggression is all the rage"— Presentation transcript

Slide1

Aggression is all the rage

Men are becoming more aggressive in the sporting arena, according to a new report. Up to 77% of all men believe modern-day society is "more aggressive today than it was 10 years ago".

As professional sport becomes more competitive, scenes of fisticuffs and tantrums are becoming a regular occurrence on the back pages of the newspapers. The likes of Eric

Cantona

and John McEnroe are just as famous for their outbursts of aggression as their phenomenal sporting talents.

‘I think we need a return to the conventions of sportsmanship ‘ says FHM Bionic editor Phil Hilton , ‘throw in Roy Keane, Alex Higgins and

Goran

Ivanisevic

and you've got yourself a tag wrestling team’. Unfortunately, the report claims average sportsmen are emulating their heroes, with 93% of men saying they play to win.

Out of the 3000 men questioned nationwide for the Sports Rage Survey, commissioned by FHM Bionic Magazine, 78% admitted to having a heated argument playing a physical contact sport. And more than half of those questioned said they had been involved in violent exchanges.

But perhaps more

worringingly

, the aggression is spilling over from football and rugby pitches. Up to 35% of men said they had been involved in a row on the tennis court, while 29% admitted to "swimming pool rage". Cricket and golf have always been regarded as gentlemen's games, played in serene conditions in the best possible spirit. But WG Grace would be turning in his grave if he knew 29% of men experienced "cricket rage" on the field. And 25% said they let their anger get the better of them on the golf course.

The report says one in 10 of all sporting arguments leads to violence - one in five in contact sports.

Although a majority of men questioned attributed the increase in male aggression to "a more stressful society", 54% of those questioned believe men "get away with being aggressive".

However, despite all the talk of sports rage, 86% of the men believed violence was an unacceptable part of sport. "I think we need a return to the conventions of sportsmanship - applauding the opposing side and shaking hands with a victorious opponent," said Phil Hilton, editor of FHM Bionic. "There is an old-world charm to these practices, admittedly, but they did keep competitors out of casualty." Slide2

Science and TechnologyHuman aggressionSlide3

Key thoughts....What are the causes of aggression? How and why should we attack others and defend ourselves? Are sports and games an effective channel for aggression? How does technology change the nature of warfare? Slide4

Lesson objectiveTo consider whether sport promotes or discourages aggression To develop understanding of the essay writing skills needed to succeed in the exam

Success criteria

The best work will:

Identify examples of aggression in sport

Justify examples with a reason

Complete notes on a section of essay Slide5

Aggression in SportAggression is often displayed in sport and sometimes boils over into unmitigated displays of violenceOften implicitly or explicitly advocated by spectators, coaches etc. and cite reasonable provocation or justificationMuch media attention is placed on displays of aggression, usually with ‘high moral ground’Slide6

Think of a sport you play or are familiar with...What are the rules regarding physical contact or violence in your sport? How do you feel if these rules are broken? What happens if a player breaks one of these rules? How often does this happen in your chosen sport?

StarterSlide7

Do certain sports lend themselves to more aggressive behaviour?Which sports are naturally more aggressive? Why might this be?Are there any sports where aggression would be counter-productive?What do we mean by the term a ‘good sport’?Slide8

Aggression in sportWatch the extract and consider the following questionshttp://www.youtube.com/watch?v=haorIA-1_Oo&feature=relatedWhy do coaches defend their players when they can clearly see that aggression is counter-productive?What role does the media play in perpetuating such aggression?

Is aggression in sport a good or bad thing?Slide9

Aggression in SportWhy do players resort to aggression and violent conduct when they know they will be penalised?E.g. Roy Keane (2001) “I’d waited long enough. I hit him f***ing hard. The ball was there (I think). Take that, you c***. I didn’t wait for Mr Elleray to show the card. I turned and walked to the dressing room”Slide10

Aggression in SportCoaches often want players to display more ‘aggression’ in their play – what they actually mean, in psychological terms, is they want to see more assertive behavioursAssertive

behaviours

reflect

behaviours

that are physically vociferous, but do not contravene rules nor do they have the

intent

to harm, rather they are aimed at imposing

influence

and

dominanceSlide11

Aggression in SportSome assertive behaviours are tolerated by officials in sports such as the ‘Haka’-

the provocative display

performed by the NZ ‘all blacks’

rugby team

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=8eGCsEQ15L4

Other behaviours that are violent but are neither assertive (aim to influence/dominate) nor aggressive (intent to harm) are not tolerated e.g., bad language, equipment abuseSlide12

Types of AggressionB

1

. No intent to harm

2. Legitimate force

3. Unusual effort and

energy expenditure

Hostile aggression

A

1

. Intent to harm

2. Goal to win

3. No anger

Source: Silva (1980)

C

1

. Intent to harm

2. Goal to harm

3. Unusual effort and

energy expenditure

Assertive

behaviour

Instrumental

aggressionSlide13

Types of AggressionAssertive behaviour1. No intent to harm

2. Legitimate force

3. Unusual effort and

energy expenditure

Hostile aggression

1. Intent to harm

2. Goal to harm

3. Unusual effort and

energy expenditure

Instrumental

aggression

1. Intent to harm

2. Goal to win

3. No anger

Source: Silva (1980)Slide14

DefinitionsCollective aggression: Violent, unified behaviours displayed by a group or crowd of people with intent to cause harm or injury to another group or individualCrowd violence: A form of collective aggression among sports supporters or fans

Hooliganism

: Crowd violence often among fans or supporters of association football teams in EuropeSlide15

DefinitionsCollective aggression:Crowd violence:

Hooliganism

:

C. Violent, unified behaviours displayed by a group or crowd of people with intent to cause harm or injury to another group or individual

B. A form of collective aggression among sports supporters or fans

A. Crowd violence often among fans or supporters of association football teams in EuropeSlide16

So is sport a positive outlet for aggression or does it cause it?Its an outlet for aggressionIt causes aggressionPlayers vent aggressive feelings so the spectators don’t have toDisplaying support for a particular player or club can be seen as aggressive but is ultimately harmless

Aggression is restrained by a shared acceptance of a code of sportsmanship

Fans may copy aggressive behaviour displayed on the pitch

Aggressive and even violent behaviour often appears to go unpunished

Club loyalty can lead to violent clashes before and after games

The ‘showbiz’ element in sport has eroded the traditional code of sportsmanshipSlide17

Have a go at an exam questionSport at the highest level seems to be all about winners and losers.Discuss whether highly competitive sport brings out the worst in those who take part.You might consider:Football violence on and off the pitch

Sports where there is no physical contact between players

What we might mean by sportsmanshipSlide18

Discuss whether highly competitive sport brings out the worst in those who take part.Slide19

Read the example from your teacher and compare it with your own response, do eitherShow an awareness of how aggression can be displayed and how it might be channelledInclude well chosen examples of actual behaviour in 1 or more sports that support and contradict the argumentFinish with a convincing conclusionShow a clear appreciation of the value of following the rules and behaving in a ‘sporting’ fashionSlide20

June 2010:If more young people played sport, there would be less violence in society. To what extent do you agree that taking part in sport reduces aggressive behaviour?You might consider:the characteristics of different sports

the

part aggression plays in sport

the

values represented

in

sport

(30 marks)Slide21

ReviewRead one of your classmates answers, using the info on the last slide try to give them suggestions as to how to improve their response