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13. : Street Crime and White . Collar . Crime and the Prison . Industrial . Complex. Social Problems. Robert . Wonser. 1. Blue. -collar Crimes . - Traditional common law theft crimes such as larceny, burglary, and arson.. ID: 362453 Download Presentation

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Lesson

13. : Street Crime and White . Collar . Crime and the Prison . Industrial . Complex. Social Problems. Robert . Wonser. 1. Blue. -collar Crimes . - Traditional common law theft crimes such as larceny, burglary, and arson..

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Lesson 13: Street Crime and White Collar Crime and the Prison Industrial Complex

Social Problems

Robert Wonser

1

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Blue-collar Crimes - Traditional common law theft crimes such as larceny, burglary, and arson.White-collar Crimes - Crimes of business enterprise such as embezzlement, price fixing, and bribery.Green-collar Crimes - Crimes that affect the environment.

Types of Economic Crimes

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Business frauds and swindlesPonzi schemes – An investment fraud that involves the payment of purported returns to existing investors from funds contributed by new investors.

White-Collar Crimes

The OG

Ponzi, Charles Ponzi, 1929

Bernie

Madoff

, 2009

Slide4

Influence peddling - Using one's institutional position to grant favors and sell information to which one's co-conspirators are not entitled.Influence peddling in governmentInfluence peddling in criminal justiceInfluence peddling in business

White-Collar Crimes

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Embezzlement - A type of larceny in which someone who is trusted with property fraudulently converts it to his or her own use or for the use of others.Client fraudHealth care fraudTax evasion

White-Collar Crimes

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Corporate (organizational) crime - Powerful institutions or their representatives willfully violate the laws that restrain these institutions from doing social harm or require them to do social good.

White-Collar Crimes

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Rational Choice: GreedLure Rational Choice: Need

Theories of White-Collar and Green-Collar Crimes

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Rationalization/Neutralization ViewCultural ViewSelf-Control View

Theories of White-Collar and Green-Collar Crimes

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Discuss which of the criminological theories fits best for green-collar criminals. Rational ChoiceGreedNeedCulturalSelf-ControlOthers?

Class Discussion/Activity

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Deterrence versus ComplianceCompliance strategies: Methods of controlling white-collar crime that rely on the threat of economic sanctions or civil penalties to control potential violators.Deterrence strategies: Methods of controlling white-collar crime that rely on punishment to deter would-be violators.

Controlling White-Collar and Green-Collar Crime

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The Prison Industrial Complex

The term

prison–industrial complex

(PIC) is used to attribute the rapid expansion of the US inmate population to the political influence of private prison companies and businesses that supply goods and services to government prison agencies.

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Incarceration Trends

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Incarceration Rate

13

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Paid between 93¢ and $4.73 per day, and collecting no benefits, prisoners are a cheap labor source for about 100 companies (

source

)

.

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If you’ve bought products by or from Starbucks, Nintendo, Victoria’s Secret, JC Penney, Sears, Wal-Mart, K-Mart, Eddie Bauer, Wendy’s, Proctor & Gamble, Johnson & Johnson, Fruit of the Loom, Motorola,

Caterpiller

, Sara Lee, Quaker Oats, Mary Kay, or Microsoft, you are part of this system.

Slide16

When prisoners are in state and federal prisons, the U.S. taxpayer is subsidizing low wages and corporate profits, since they are paying for prisoners’ room, board, and health care.

When prisoners are in private prisons, prison labor is a way to make more money off of the human beings caught in the corrections industry. In other words, prison labor is an efficient way for corporations to continue to increase their profits without sharing those gains with their employees.

16

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Prison

Labor

is Cheap

Angela Davis on PIC

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