1 Introduction to Computability Theory

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1 Introduction to Computability Theory




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Presentations text content in 1 Introduction to Computability Theory

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Introduction to Computability Theory

Lecture5: Context

Free Languages

Prof. Amos Israeli

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On the last lecture we completed our study of regular languages. (There is still a lot to learn but our time is limited…).

Introduction and Motivation

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In our study of RL-s we Covered:Motivation and definition of regular languages.DFA-s, NFA-s, RE-s and their equivalence.Non Regular Languages and the Pumping Lemma.

Introduction and Motivation

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In this lecture, we turn to Context Free Grammars and Context Free Languages.The class of Context Free Languages is an intermediate class between the class of regular languages and the class of Decidable Languages (To be defined).

Introduction and Motivation

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A Context Free Grammar is a “machine” that creates a language.A language created by a CF grammar is called A Context Free Language.(We will show that) The class of Context Free Languages Properly Contains the class of Regular Languages.

Introduction and Motivation

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Consider grammar : A CFL consists of substitution rules called Productions.The capital letters are the Variables. The other symbols are the Terminals.

Context Free Grammar - Example

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Consider grammar : The grammar generates the language called the language of , denoted by .

Context Free Grammar - Example

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Consider grammar : This is a Derivation of the word by : On each step, a single rule is activated. This mechanism is nondeterministic.

Context Free Grammar - Example

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This is A Parse Tree of the word by :

Context Free Grammar - Example

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Each internal node of the tree is associated with a single production.

Context Free Grammar - Example

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A Context Free Grammar is a 4-tupple where: is a finite set called the variables. is a finite set, disjoint from V called the terminals. is a set of rules, where a rule is a variable and a string of variables and terminals, and is the start variable .

CF Grammar – A Formal Definition

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,

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A word is a string of terminals.A derivation of a word w from a context Free Grammar is a sequence of strings ,over , where: is the start variable of G. For each , is obtained by activating a single production (rule) of G on one of the variables of .

A Derivation – A Formal Definition

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A word w is in the Language of grammar G, denoted by , if there exists a derivation whose rightmost string is w .Thus,

CF Grammar – A Formal Definition

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Grammar

: Rules:1. 2. 3.

Example2: Arithmetical EXPS

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Derivation of by Grammar : input

Example2: Arithmetical EXPS

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Derivation of by Grammar : input rule

Example2: Arithmetical EXPS

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Derivation of by Grammar

: input output rule

Example2: Arithmetical EXPS

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Derivation of by Grammar

: input

Example2: Arithmetical EXPS

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Derivation of by Grammar : input rule

Example2: Arithmetical EXPS

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Derivation of by Grammar : input output rule

Example2: Arithmetical EXPS

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Derivation of by Grammar : input

Example2: Arithmetical EXPS

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Derivation of by Grammar : input rule

Example2: Arithmetical EXPS

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Derivation of by Grammar : input output rule

Example2: Arithmetical EXPS

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Derivation of by Grammar : input

Example2: Arithmetical EXPS

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Derivation of by Grammar : input rule

Example2: Arithmetical EXPS

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Derivation of by Grammar

: input output rule

Example2: Arithmetical EXPS

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Derivation of by Grammar

: input

Example2: Arithmetical EXPS

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Derivation of by Grammar

: input rule

Example2: Arithmetical EXPS

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Derivation of by Grammar

: input output rule

Example2: Arithmetical EXPS

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Derivation of by Grammar

: input

Example2: Arithmetical EXPS

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Derivation of by Grammar

: input rule

Example2: Arithmetical EXPS

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Derivation of by Grammar

: input output rule

Example2: Arithmetical EXPS

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Derivation of by Grammar

: input

Example2: Arithmetical EXPS

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Derivation of by Grammar

: input rule

Example2: Arithmetical EXPS

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Derivation of by Grammar

: input output rule

Example2: Arithmetical EXPS

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Derivation of by Grammar

: input

Example2: Arithmetical EXPS

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Derivation of by Grammar

: input rule

Example2: Arithmetical EXPS

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Derivation of by Grammar

: output rule

Example2: Arithmetical EXPS

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Derivation of by Grammar

: input

Example2: Arithmetical EXPS

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Derivation of by Grammar

: input rule

Example2: Arithmetical EXPS

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Derivation of by Grammar

: output rule

Example2: Arithmetical EXPS

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Derivation of by Grammar

: input

Example2: Arithmetical EXPS

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Derivation of by Grammar

: input rule

Example2: Arithmetical EXPS

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Derivation of by Grammar

:

Example2: Arithmetical EXPS

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Derivation of by Grammar :

Example2: Arithmetical EXPS

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Note:

There is more than one derivation.

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To be Demonstrated on the blackboard

Example3: The Language of WF ( )

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We already saw that a word may have more then a single derivation from the same grammar.A Leftmost Derivation is a derivation in which rules are applied in order left to right.A grammar is ambiguous if it has Two parse trees.

Ambiguity

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Reminder: Two parse trees are equal if they are equal as trees and if all productions corresponding to inner nodes are also equal .

Ambiguity

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Grammar : Rules:

Example4: Similar to Arith. EXPS

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,

,

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Example4: 1

st

Parse Tree for______

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Example4: 2

nd

Parse Tree for_____

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Note: Some ambiguous grammars may have an unambiguous equivalent grammar.But: There exist Inherently Ambiguous Grammars , i.e. an ambiguous grammar that does not have an equivalent unambiguous one.

Ambiguity

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Q: From a computational point of view, how strong are context free languages?A: Since the language is not regular and it is CF, we conclude that . Q: Can one prove ?A: Yes.

Discussion

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Q: A language is regular if it is recognized by a DFA (or NFA). Does there exist a type of machine that characterizes CFL?A: Yes, those are the Push-Down Automata (Next Lecture). . Q: Can one prove a language not to be CFL ?A: Yes, by the Pumping Lemma for CFL-s . For example: is not CFL.

Discussion

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