Healthy Lifestyles 15 What kind of exercise is best to help reduce stress?
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Healthy Lifestyles 15 What kind of exercise is best to help reduce stress?

Should I take vitamins when I am stressed?. Could stress have anything to do with the extra fat I have accumulated since I started college?. Key Questions. When . I get stressed, I can’t sleep, and when I can’t sleep, my stress level rises. It feels like a vicious cycle. What can I do to ease my stress so I can sleep better?.

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Healthy Lifestyles 15 What kind of exercise is best to help reduce stress?




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Presentation on theme: "Healthy Lifestyles 15 What kind of exercise is best to help reduce stress?"— Presentation transcript:

Slide1

Healthy Lifestyles

15

Slide2
What kind of exercise is best to help reduce stress?Should I take vitamins when I am stressed?Could stress have anything to do with the extra fat I have accumulated since I started college?

Key Questions

Slide3
When I get stressed, I can’t sleep, and when I can’t sleep, my stress level rises. It feels like a vicious cycle. What can I do to ease my stress so I can sleep better?

Since I started college, I’ve been drinking more. I know drinking isn’t good for me, but it helps me relax. If I give up drinking, what can I do to help me deal with the stress of college?

Key Questions (cont’d.)

Slide4
Explain the health and stress-relieving benefits of a balanced exercise programDescribe the components of a healthy

dietExplain the impact of stress on nutritional needs and body fat

Discuss the relationship between stress and eating

disorders

Objectives

Slide5
Implement healthy sleep habitsAssess the amount of sleep you

requireExplain unhealthy coping strategies, including the negative effects of tobacco, alcohol, and

drugs

Incorporate healthy lifestyle habits into your life to reduce and eliminate

stress

Objectives (cont’d.)

Slide6
Stress is known to influence health through its direct physiological effect and also through its indirect effect via altered health behaviorsTaking care of your body is an important stress-prevention strategy

Healthy Lifestyles

Slide7
Exercise as a stress bufferThe body uses excess blood sugar, muscles use the stress hormones

adrenaline and cortisol, and other circulating fats in the bloodstream are used for energy

Exercise

Slide8
Regular exercise has a beneficial influence on more than

physical healthFeel better emotionally

Function

more effectively

May involve:

Release of serotonin and endorphins

Reduction in cortisol

Muscle relaxation

Decreased risk of using alcohol, smoking, and overeating

Research Highlight: Looking Good, Feeling Great

Slide9
Other benefits of exerciseImprove moodReduce anxiety

Increase energyEndorphinsWithstand

cardiovascular and respiratory effects of the alarm stage of stress better

Sense of control

Exercise

Slide10
Individuals who walk 10,000 steps per day have:Improved post-exercise heart

rateBetter total cholesterol

I

mproved flexibility

B

etter

overall physical and psychological well-being

FYI: For Better Health, Take a Walk

Slide11
Cardiorespiratory fitnessMuscle fitnessStrength

EnduranceFlexibilityBody composition

Components of

Physical Fitness

Slide12
Which exercise is best?Any exercise that you enjoy, that is healthy, and that you will

doFactors that help people stick to exerciseEnjoyment

Convenience

Social support

Choosing Your Exercise

Slide13
The highest rate of decline in physical activity occurs in the early adulthood period between 18 and 24 years of age

FYI: Couch Potatoes in the Making

Slide14
What Mood Are You In?

Slide15
Tools for a healthy dietDietary Guidelines for Americans

ChooseMyPlateNutrition and stressThe body gets energy from three sources

C

arbohydrates

, fats, and

proteins

During stress, we need a balance of the three sources

Nutrition

Slide16
Many nutritionists recommend taking a vitamin–mineral supplement to prepare for stressful times

Megadoses aren’t necessary

FYI: Do I Need a Vitamin?

Slide17
Stress reaction can spike glucose levels and lead to poor eating choices

Patients who control their stress tend to do a better job of managing their diabetes

Research Highlight: Cut Stress, Reduce Diabetes

Slide18
Fresh fruits and vegetablesContain many of the vitamins and minerals we

needLegumesHigh in fiber and

loaded

with important

nutrients

Whole grains

Result

in a more stable blood sugar level and, as a result, a more stable mood and energy level

Nutrition

Slide19
WaterLow water levels in the body can affect our moods and perceptions dramatically

Nutrition (cont’d.)

Slide20
Be on the lookout for hidden sugars

Sodas, energy drinks, and sport drinks are to blame for 36% of added sugar in our diet

FYI: Hidden Sugars

Slide21
CaffeineIncrease stress hormones, which may persist

Trans fatty acidsIncreases plaque deposits in blood

vessels raising risk of heart disease and stroke

Soft drinks

Typical

soft drink contains about 12 teaspoons of

sugar; many contain caffeine

Overeating

Nutrition: What to Limit or Avoid

Slide22
Chronic cortisol secretion, from chronic stress response activation in children may Affect the timing of

pubertyAffect body compositionC

ause

early-onset obesity, metabolic syndrome, and

type 2

diabetes

FYI: Childhood Stress and Obesity

Slide23
Students awaiting an exam report higher emotional stress and an increased tendency to eat to distract themselves from stress

Research Highlight: Comfort Food

Slide24
Eating to cope – the food/mood connectionSome people respond to stress by overeating

Emotional eating is often mindless and unrelated to hungerWhen we

eat, dopamine is released

Makes

us feel good and can help offset

emotional

pain

Stress and Healthy Eating

Slide25
Unused glucoseWhen the body calls upon the fight-or-flight response, it draws glucose from stored glycogen and

fatGlycogen stores are depleted but the glucose that was released was not used for

energy and is stored as fat

Stress and Healthy Eating

Slide26
76% of female students and 33% of males say they eat when under stress67% of the women gained weight

and 86% of the men did

FYI: Bad Habits Contribute to Weight Gain throughout College

Slide27
The cortisol connectionActivation of the stress response results in massive secretion of the stress hormone

cortisolOne result of the continued secretion of cortisol is that the body stores fat in the arteries and the abdomen

Stress and Healthy Eating

Slide28
Runaway eatingConsistent use of food and food-related

behaviors to deal with unpleasant feelings and the sense that these feelings are out of control

Eating Disorders

Slide29
AnorexiaSelf-starvation and extreme weight lossBulimia

Secretive cycle of binge eating followed by purgingBinge eating disorderCharacterized

primarily by periods of uncontrolled, impulsive, or continuous eating beyond the point of feeling comfortably

full

Types of Eating Disorders

Slide30
Complex conditions Arise from a combination of long-standing behavioral, emotional, psychological, interpersonal, and social

factorsBiological and biochemical factors also involved

Causes of Eating Disorders

Slide31
43% of Americans between the ages of 13 and 64 say they rarely or never get a good night’s sleep on weeknightsHyperarousal

caused by stress can upset the balance between sleep and wakefulness Alters

our chemical and physiological balance

Sleep

Slide32
Sleepy connected AmericansCommunications technology use before sleep is

pervasiveTeens and young adults are more often sleepy

Coping

with sleepiness

often involves caffeine

and naps

Sleep

Slide33
There is no single right amountMost people need 7 to 8 hours of sleep each night

How Much Sleep Is Needed?

Slide34
Schedule your sleep time

Time Tip: Sleep

Slide35
Insomnia can lead to depressionDepression can lead to insomnia

Research Highlight: Sleep and Depression

Slide36
Set and stick to a sleep scheduleExpose

yourself to bright light in the morning and avoid it at nightExercise regularly

Establish

a relaxing bedtime

routine

Create

a cool, comfortable sleeping environment that is free of

distractions

Unplug

Healthy Sleep Advice

Slide37
Treat your bed as your sanctuary from the stresses of the dayKeep

a "worry book" next to your bedAvoid caffeinated beverages, chocolate, and tobacco at

night

Avoid

large meals and beverages right before

bedtime

No nightcaps

More Advice on Sleep

Slide38
Avoid medicines that delay or disrupt your sleepNo

late-afternoon or evening naps, unless you work nights

More Advice on

Sleep (cont’d.)

Slide39
Try an evening foot soakTraditional Chinese method

FYI: Alternative

S

leep

T

echniques

Slide40
TobaccoAn individual with a high stress level is approximately 15 times more likely to be a smoker than a person with low stress

Nicotine is a dangerous and highly addictive stimulant

Lifestyle Behaviors to Avoid

Slide41
Many college students engage in various risky behaviors, including alcohol use, tobacco use, physical inactivity, and unhealthy eating practices

Failure of college students to engage in healthier lifestyle practices is not unique to the United States

Culture Connection: Risky Business

Slide42
Many public health messages emphasize the need to adopt healthy lifestyle habits

Only 3% of Americans follow all four key healthy lifestyle habits

N

ot smoking

M

aintaining

a healthy body

weight

C

onsuming

five or more fruits and vegetables per

day

E

xercising

at least moderately for 30 minutes or more at least 5 days per week

FYI: Only 3% of Americans Follow a Healthy Lifestyle

Slide43
Overall, African Americans consume less alcohol per person than whitesYet twice as many African Americans die of cirrhosis of the liver each

yearHispanic cultures tend to discourage drinking by women but encourage heavy drinking by men as part of

machismo

Hispanic men have higher rates of alcohol use and abuse than the general population, yet few enter treatment programs

Culture Connection: Drinking and Race

Slide44
Native Americans have three times the rate of the general population of alcohol- related injury and illnessBoth a biological predisposition and socioeconomic conditions may contribute

In some tribes, 10.5 out of every 1,000 newborns have fetal alcohol syndrome, compared with 1 to 3 out of 1,000 in the general population

Culture Connection: Drinking and Race

Slide45
Asian Americans tend to drink very little or not at allMay

relate to cultural values May relate to inborn physiological reactions to alcohol

Result

in facial flushing, rapid heart rate, lowered blood pressure, nausea, and other unpleasant symptoms

Culture Connection: Drinking and Race

Slide46
Men have more than a one in 5 lifetime risk of developing alcohol abuse or dependence

Genetic factors account for about 40–60% of the risk for alcohol-use disordersEnvironmental factors include:

Alcohol

availability, attitudes toward drinking, peer pressure, stress levels, coping strategies,

drinking laws; being a regular smoker

FYI: Men Twice as Likely as Women to Develop Alcohol Dependence

Slide47
Drinking by adolescents and young adults is influenced by unique factorsIncreased sensitivity to stress

Increased propensity to initiate alcohol useOn campusStress-related

drinking is

common

Athletes drink more than non-athletes

Fraternity members are among the heaviest drinkers

Lifestyle Behaviors to Avoid

Slide48
Among alcoholic men who successfully completed treatment and then experienced severe stressThose who resumed drinking experienced twice as much severe and prolonged stress before their return to drinking as those who remained abstinent

Research Highlight: Stress and the Alcoholic

Slide49
People may drink because they think it will help them reduce stressM

ore than one or two drinks per day can lead to many problems, including alcoholism, liver diseases, various cancers, and many types of accidents

Drinking

is also associated

with other unhealthy behaviors such as smoking, sexual aggression, and violence

Consequence of Drinking

Slide50
Choosing drugs as a way of coping with stress is an unhealthy choice, with many negative

consequencesWith legalization of marijuana in some states, its impact on health should be monitored

Drugs

Slide51
Stress may be one of the most powerful triggers for relapse in individuals addicted to drugs, even after long periods of abstinence from abused substances

Research Highlight: Stress and Drug Addiction

Slide52
Understanding that making healthy choices and living a healthy lifestyle is fundamental to well-being is not a new idea to most of us

Putting It Together

Slide53
While you can’t shut out stress and illness entirely, through healthy lifestyle choices, you can make your body a place where health thrives

Conclusion

Slide54
Exercise using any activity that will keep your heart rate elevated for 30 to 60 minutesDo it at a time you are feeling very high levels of stress

After you are finished, notice the change in how you feel

Lab 15.1 The Power of Exercise to Reduce Stress