What do you think is happening and why?
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What do you think is happening and why?

Why were the poor treated so harshly under the Tudors?. By the end of this section you should be able to …. Understand the ways in which social and economic changes can effect what is considered to be a crime.

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What do you think is happening and why?




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Presentation on theme: "What do you think is happening and why?"— Presentation transcript:

Slide1

What do you think is happening and why?

Slide2

Why were the poor treated so harshly under the Tudors?

Slide3

By the end of this section you should be able to …

Understand the ways in which social and economic changes can effect what is considered to be a crime

Explain why begging concerned wealthy and powerful people by the 16

th

century.

Slide4

Many people became unemployed

Money did not stretch to far

The poor and sick had nowhere

to go

Many men lost

their work

There was increased pressure upon food and jobs

The sick and poor had to rely upon their family or the community for help (if they could/would give it)

There were fewer workers needed so people lost their jobs.

The

poor no longer had access to common land to graze their animals or to collect fire wood

Slide5

Problems

in the cloth industry –

Manufacture

moved to the continent

esp.

Flanders and Artois

Inflation caused prices to rise quickly

Many

landowners stopped growing crops and kept sheep instead

The Wars of the Roses ended

The population increased

The monasteries were closed down

by Henry VIII

There was no national system to help

the sick or unemployed

Some land owners

began enclosing land

Slide6

The Bristler

The Bristler would use specially weighted dice (‘bristles’ were loaded or crooked dice), which would land on whichever number the Bristler chose.

Slide7

The Counterfeit Crank

Dressed in old, grubby clothes, he would pretend to have violent fits. He would often suck soap so that he frothed at the mouth! The worse he shook, the more money he hoped to attract.

Slide8

The Clapper Dudgeon

He would cut his skin to make it bleed and tie dirty rags over the wounds to make it look even worse. He hoped people would feel sorry for him and give him money so he could get medical attention.

Slide9

The Baretop Trickster

She would flash a man in the street and ask him to buy her a meal. The man, thinking he might get to have sex with the woman, would follow her to a nearby house. . . Where a vicious gang would be waiting to rob him!

Slide10

Tom O'Bedlam

He would pretend to be mad and follow people around. Often he would carry a stick with a piece of meat attached to the end or spend hours barking like a dog or stuffing chicken heads into his ears.

Slide11

‘Sturdy’ or ‘Deserving’?

Some places, such as York, issued badges to sick or injured beggars, who were thought to deserve help (the ‘deserving poor’). This separated them from those considered lazy – called ‘sturdy beggars’.

Slide12

1495

Monarch: Henry VIIBeggars to go into the stocks for three days, then sent back to their place of birth or previous residence (where they last lived).

Slide13

1531

Monarch: Henry VIIISome ‘worthy poor’, old, and sick given licence to beg. Others should be whipped and sent back to where they came from. Harsher punishments for repeat offenders.

Slide14

1547

Monarch: Edward VIBeggars whipped and branded with a V on forehead (for vagabond). Also to be made a slave for two years. If they offend again or try to escape, they will be executed (this law remained in force for three years before it was changed back to the 1531 law because it was viewed as too severe)

Slide15

1601

Monarch: Elizabeth ILocal taxes should help the poor. Poor people who refuse to work should be imprisoned. Beggars will sill be whipped until they bleed and sent back to where they came from.

Slide16

Who Were The 'Sturdy Beggars'?

The BristlerThe Counterfeit CrankThe Clapper DudgeonThe Baretop TricksterTom O’BedlamWhat did they do to try to get money?What did they do to try to get money?What did they do to try to get money?What did they do to try to get money?What did they do to try to get money?Why would people have given them money?Why would people have given them money?Why would people have given them money?Why would people have given them money?Why would people have given them money?

Q) What was the difference between a ‘sturdy beggar’ and on of the ‘deserving poor’? How did the law treat them differently?

Slide17

1495

1531

1547

1601

King or Queen

King or Queen

King or Queen

King or Queen

What happened to beggars under this law?

What happened to beggars under this law?

What happened to beggars under this law?

What happened to beggars under this law?

What was the law designed to do?

What was the law designed to do?

What was the law designed to do?

What was the law designed to do?

Why do you think the law treated beggars like it did?

How was this law different to previous laws?

How was this law different to previous laws?

How was this law different to previous laws?

Slide18

Source A. A beggar is tied and whipped through the streets (1567)

Source B. Vagabonds and Beggars Act (1494)

‘Vagabonds , idle and suspected persons shall be set in the stocks for three days and three nights and have none other sustenance but bread and water and then shall be put out of town. Every beggar suitable to work shall resort to the Hundred where he last dwelled, is best known, or was born and there remain.’

[Hundred – An area of administration, a little like counties today]

What can you learn from Sources A and B about changes in how seriously begging was treated by the law? (4 marks) Basic 1-2 marks: The answer gives details from the sources but does not identify changeGood 3-4 marks: The answer identifies change and uses information from both sources to support (identify and explain) the change.

Exam style question

1

Slide19

What might the following people think about the growing number of beggars and the threat they pose to law and order?

An unemployed cloth worker

An Elizabethan landowner