Culinary Arts

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I. Day #34. . Nutrients in . veggies. Rich in several vitamins and minerals.. Vitamin C, K, folic acid, and calcium. Also an important source of fiber, carbohydrates, and . phytochemicals. .. Several have antioxidants – which can reduce your chance of developing cancer. ID: 372330 Download Presentation

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Culinary Arts

I. Day #34. . Nutrients in . veggies. Rich in several vitamins and minerals.. Vitamin C, K, folic acid, and calcium. Also an important source of fiber, carbohydrates, and . phytochemicals. .. Several have antioxidants – which can reduce your chance of developing cancer.

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Culinary Arts




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Culinary Arts I

Day #34

Slide2

Nutrients in veggies

Rich in several vitamins and minerals.

Vitamin C, K, folic acid, and calcium

Also an important source of fiber, carbohydrates, and

phytochemicals

.

Several have antioxidants – which can reduce your chance of developing cancer

Slide3

Types (parts of plants)

1. Flowers – Broccoli and cauliflower are parts of plant- they are tender and can be eaten cooked or raw.

2. Fruits – Most vegetables from the fruit part, can be eaten raw, such as: tomatoes, cucumbers, and peppers. Others like eggplant and squash are usually cooked.

3. Seeds – part that grows new plants, require minimal cooking – examples: beans, corns, and peas

4. Stems – edible, tender, minimal cooking – example: asparagus

Slide4

Types (parts of plants)

5. Leaves – cabbage, lettuce,

brussel

sprouts, and spinach: tender and eaten raw, minimal cooking

6. Roots – store a plant’s food supply, includes: carrots, turnips, and radishes

7. Tubers – potato is a familiar tuber – large underground stem that stores nutrients. This part of the plant must be cooked.

8. Bulbs – layers of fresh leaves surrounding the underground part of stem – onions and

garlics

are bulbs

Slide5

Types cont…

Sea Vegetables

– also known as seaweeds, these grow in waters with filtered sunlight: classified as algae, not plants.

Carragreen

– a sea vegetable that helps produce the consistency of such products as ice cream, salad dressings, soups, and pudding mixes.

Slide6

Buying fresh…

Look for these signs of quality:

1. Ripeness – buy only what you can use during the storage life of the vegetable; should be used within 2 to 5 days of buying, although root vegetables last 1 to 7 days

2. Color and texture – have bright characteristics of color and crisp texture. Avoid green potatoes: exposed to light and may indicate a bitter toxic compound,

solanine

3. Shape and size – should be typical for type selected and should feel “heavy” – immature ones will lack flavor

4. Condition – Avoid damaged, decayed, or wilted: they have lost nutrients and won’t last long

Slide7

How to store?

Potatoes – in a dark, cool and dry place

If you must store at room temperature, only buy what you need

Do not refrigerate because mold will be produced

Onions – cool, dry area. Place in basket or loosely woven air bag so air can circulate around them.

Other – stored in a crisper, and in plastic bags in fridge

Slide8

Commercially Processed forms

Canned:

Softer texture, some nutrients are broken down

Frozen:

Closest in nutrients to fresh.

Blanched first,

then froze.

Dried

Dehydrated to preserve freshness.

Some will darken naturally, so prep accordingly.

Slide9

Cooking…

Always wash fresh vegetables BEFORE cooking!

How cooking affects vegetables:

1. Nutrients – some dissolve in water when cooking

2. Texture – heat softens the cellulose, making them tender. If overcooked, they become mushy

3. Color – when cooked properly, vegetables remain colorful: steaming is the BEST option to retain color

4. Flavor – cooking releases flavors, when overcooked, they lose their flavor and develop an unpleasant odor.

Slide10

Cooking…

Simmering

Steaming

Pressure – Cooking

Braising

Frying

Baking

Roasting

Grilling

Microwave

Slide11

Vegetable Cookery

Please go to my blog:

https://blogs.waukeeschools.org/

lcalvert

Go to Culinary Arts I tab and click on vegetable research assignment.

Download worksheet-will need to answer these questions.

I attached links for each website to make it easier for you to research.

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