A Perspective on Ageing People with Sensory Disabilities

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A Perspective on Ageing People with Sensory Disabilities




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Presentations text content in A Perspective on Ageing People with Sensory Disabilities

Slide1

A Perspective on Ageing People with Sensory Disabilities

Jeign CraigVice President HIPEN

Slide2

Slide3

Hearing Loss

Hearing loss

affects more

than

10 million people in the UK ( 1 in 6 of the population)

The most common type of hearing loss is called ‘

presbyacusis

’ or ‘age-related hearing loss’.

(70

% of people aged over

70

more

than 90% of people aged over

80 have a hearing loss

.

)

Many people

living in sheltered

housing, residential

and nursing homes for older people will have a hearing

loss.

They may not have

recognised it or sought help.

It

is vital that these people are supported to manage their hearing loss

and minimise

the impact on their quality of life.

Slide4

Care Providers

Staff in the care homes should be trained,

so they can:

1 Intervene early

in hearing loss

.

2

Meet

communication needs

.

3

Improve

hearing aid use and management.

Slide5

Hearing loss

Hearing loss is usually described in terms of severity:

mild

moderate

severe

profound

mild

hearing

loss will mean some

difficulty following speech, especially in noisy environments.

They

may wear hearing aids – if their hearing loss has been diagnosed – and find

lipreading

useful.

They

will nearly always use speech to communicate.

Slide6

moderate

hearing loss

means the person will

find it difficult to follow speech, especially in noisy environments.

They

will probably wear hearing aids

and/or

lipread

severe

hearing loss

means the person may

have difficulty following speech, even with hearing aids.

They

may

lipread

and/or use British Sign Language (BSL) and communication support

Slide7

profound

hearing loss

means a person may

use BSL as their first or preferred

language.

People who use BSL often consider themselves to be part of the Deaf community.

23,000

people in the UK

are

deafblind

they

have a combined hearing and sight loss. Many people who are

deafblind

have some hearing and vision.

Others

will be totally deaf and/or totally blind.

Slide8

The Impact of Hearing loss

If people

are not supported to manage their hearing loss effectively

,

it can

lead to:

• communication

difficulties

• social isolation

• anger and frustration

• low confidence, especially in social settings

• depression

• stress and anxiety

.

For many

people with age-related hearing loss

their life will lead to

a life

without active

participation.

Others

may want

help

but may

not be sure

of what

they

can do.

Slide9

Dementia

Recent research has

shown

that there is a link between

hearing loss and dementia

.

People with mild hearing loss have nearly twice the chance of

developing

dementia.

The risk

increases –

three times for people

with

moderate hearing loss,

and

five times

for

people

with

severe

hearing loss.

Slide10

Hearing and sight loss

As people get older, their sight, as well as their

hearing, begins

to worsen.

People

with a combined

hearing and sight loss

will

find:

Communicating

effectively

will be very challenging

Problems with reading

Problems getting around

Problems carrying

out simple tasks without

help

they

may not answer questions

appropriately – this can be

misinterpreted as an early sign of

dementia

Older people with hearing and sight loss may easily

become

withdrawn

and depressed.

Their isolation may

have a negative

effect on their relationships with family

and

friends.

Slide11

Communication - lipreading

F

ind

a suitable environment with good lighting, away from noise and distractions

Sit

or stand at the same level

about 1m away

from the

lipreader

Face

the light, or your face will be in shadow

Make

sure the

lipreader

is looking at you before you speak

Introduce

the topic of conversation

Speak

clearly at a moderate pace, without raising your

voice

Use

natural body language.

Keep

your face visible

.

Check

that the

lipreader

is following you.

Be

patient and take time to communicate.

Slide12

Communication – Write key words

If you

can’t make yourself understood, write down key words (not everything) and then continue the conversation.

If

the person has sight problems, use a thicker pen or a different colour pen or paper, and make your writing bigger. Work together to find out what will help the most

.

Don’t use CAPITAL

LETTERS. It’s the written equivalent of shouting and doesn’t actually make things clearer.

Slide13

Communication – body language

Point

to objects, pictures or people that you are talking about.

Use

facial expressions

to show how you feel.

Use

objects

to represent

people, things or activities.

Put the

object in the person’s hand so they can feel or smell it.

This

is often a good method for communicating with

deafblind

people, or people with learning disabilities or dementia.

[e.g. you

could

put a

cup in their hand for “Would you like some tea

?”]

Slide14

Communication – professional support

S

ign

language

interpreters

Lipspeakers

Notetakers

S

peech-to-text reporters

also

(although mainly used in educational environments)

Communication Support Workers

Cued Speech Transliterators

Slide15

Communication - the environment

Flooring

- carpet

helps to absorb noise.

Soft furnishings

help to

reduce sound reverberation and echo.

Walls

and

curtains

-

busy

or bold patterns on can

be distracting

.

Good

lighting

- without

any glare or shadows

.

Thick tablecloths

reduce

the

noise of

cutlery and crockery.

Round dining tables

-

so everyone can see each other.

Slide16

Recognising the signs of age-related hearing loss

A person who is losing their hearing will:

• complain

about others mumbling

• need to have things repeated several times

• complain that they cannot hear as well as they used to

will not

react to you

• struggle to hear on the telephone

• have the TV or radio

very

loud

cannot follow

conversation in noisy

places.

change

in behaviour

- be

more withdrawn or stop taking part in conversation and activities

.

Slide17

Hearing aids

Many people with hearing loss find hearing aids very helpful.

It

can take some time for people to adjust to their hearing aids and it’s important that they get

support.

Digital hearing aids

(UK provide these free

on

NHS, they

can also be bought privately

.)

Digital means that the audiologist can fine-tune them to match a person’s hearing loss and needs.

Slide18

Behind-the-ear (BTE) hearing aid

Slide19

In-the-ear (ITE) hearing aid

Slide20

Body worn hearing aid

Slide21

Managing a hearing aid

Daily check to see if it is working

Adjusting the settings

Cleaning the

earmould

and tube

Re-tubing

Changing the batteries

All of the above may be difficult for elderly people (using fine manual skills/ understanding)

Slide22

Aids to hearing

telephones fitted

with a hearing loop or are specially designed for people with hearing

loss

textphones

a

hearing loop or infrared

system for the TV, radio, music system

flashing

smoke

alarms

accessible

entry

systems (vibrating or flashing doorbell)

good

lighting in all

areas

TV

with

digital

subtitles

quiet environment (minimise background noise)

seating

arrangement that is helpful for

communication

Slide23

UK organisations

Age UK

www.ageuk.org.uk

Action

on Hearing Loss

www.actiononhearlingloss.org.uk

Association

of Teachers of

Lipreading

to Adults

(ATLA)

www.lipreading.org.uk

British Deaf Association (BDA)

www.bda.org.uk

British Tinnitus Association (BTA

)

www.tinnitus.org.uk

Hearing Link

www.hearinglink.org

Slide24

Hearing Dogs for Deaf People

www.hearing-dogs.org.uk

Deafblind

UK

www.deafblind.org.uk

National Association for Deafened

People (NADP)

www.nadp.org.uk

Sign

Health

www.signhealth.org.uk

Text

Relay

www.textrelay.org.uk

RNIB

www.rnib.org.uk

Sense

www.sense.org.uk

Signature

www.signature.org.uk

Slide25

Key points – a summary

Age of onset of deafness

Type of deafness

Other disabilities

Communication needs

Worsening sight, mobility etc

Other health issues

Varying situations – home, care home, hospital

Achieving Independence – support needed

Slide26

Give information of what is available to people suffering from hearing lossGive information of what is available to people caring for elderly peopleGive training to people who have a hearing lossGive training for people who are caring for elderly people with a hearing loss – ProDeafToolKit

How can we help?


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