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Conservative and non-conservative forces
Conservative and non-conservative forces

Conservative and non-conservative forces - PowerPoint Presentation

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Conservative and non-conservative forces - Description

P otential energy T otal mechanical energy Energy conservation Lecture 11 Potential energy Conservative forces A force is called conservative if the work it does on an object as the object goes between two points is ID: 541475 Download Presentation

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Presentation on theme: "Conservative and non-conservative forces"— Presentation transcript

Slide1

Conservative and non-conservative forcesPotential energyTotal mechanical energyEnergy conservation

Lecture 11: Potential energySlide2

Conservative forces

A force is called

conservative

if the work it does on an object as the object goes between two points is independent of the path.⟶ The work done by a conservative force along any two paths between the same two points is the same.

 Slide3

Example: Work done by gravity

 

Depends only on

and

,

not on path

⟶ force of gravity is conservative

 Slide4

P

roperties of conservative forces:

Reverse path, get negative:

Work

done over a closed path is zero:

 Slide5

Constant forces are conservative

 

depends only on initial and final position, not path

 

Caution:

1. Force must be constant in

magnitude

and

direction.

2. Not every conservative force has to be constant.Slide6

Non-conservative forces

If the

work

done by a force depends on the path, the force is non-conservative.Different paths between initialand final point give different amount of workWork for closed path is not zero.

HW: examine frictional forceSlide7

Potential energy difference: definition

 

Work of conservative force

depends only on initial and final position, not on path

each

pair of points has unique value of W between

them

 

Define:

Difference in potential energy

of force

between

positions

and

 Slide8

Potential energy: reference point

 

Only

differences

in potential are

meaningful

C

hoose arbitrary reference point

and assign it a value of potential energy

that is convenient

 

 Slide9

Potential energy of gravity*

 

(y-axis vertically up)

 

Choose

and assign

 

with

y-axis

up

 

*near Earth’s surfaceSlide10
Slide11

Potential energy of spring force

Choose

as reference point,

assign

 

 

 

 

From lecture 10:Slide12

Total mechanical energy

 

 

T

otal

mechanical energy of a

system

:

 

 Slide13

 

 

If only

conservative

forces act:

Total mechanical energy is

conserved.

 Slide14

Example

In a new Olympic discipline, a ski jumper of mass

M

is launched by means of a compressed spring

of spring constant k. At the top of a frictionless ski jump at height H above the ground, he is pushed against the spring, compressing it a distance L. When he is released from rest, the spring pushes him so he leaves the lower end of the ski jump with a speed V at a positive angle θ with respect to the horizontal.

Determine the height D of the end of the ski jump in terms of given system parameters.Slide15

Tension in coupled objects

Net

work done

by tension in coupled system is zero

 Slide16

Example with coupled objects

A block of mass

m

is on a

frictionless incline that makes an angle θ with the vertical. A light string attaches it to another block of mass M that hangs over a massless frictionless pulley. The blocks are then released from rest, and the block of mass M descends. What is the blocks’ speed after they move a distance D

?