1 Introduction to Computability Theory PowerPoint Presentation, PPT - DocSlides

1 Introduction to Computability Theory PowerPoint Presentation, PPT - DocSlides

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Lecture15: . Reductions. Prof. Amos Israeli. The rest of the course deals with an important tool in Computability and Complexity theories, namely: . Reductions. .. . The reduction technique enables us to use the undecidability of to prove many other languages undecidable.. ID: 257219

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Slide1

1

Introduction to Computability Theory

Lecture15:

Reductions

Prof. Amos Israeli

Slide2

The rest of the course deals with an important tool in Computability and Complexity theories, namely: Reductions. The reduction technique enables us to use the undecidability of to prove many other languages undecidable.

Introduction

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Slide3

A reduction always involves two computational problems. Generally speaking, the idea is to show that a solution for some problem A induces a solution for problem B. If we know that B does not have a solution, we may deduce that A is also insolvable. In this case we say that B is reducible to A.

Introduction

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Slide4

In the context of undecidability: If we want to prove that a certain language L is undecidable. We assume by way of contradiction that L is decidable, and show that a decider for L, can be used to devise a decider for . Since is undecidable, so is the language L.

Introduction

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Slide5

Using a decider for L to construct a decider for , is called reducing L to . Note: Once we prove that a certain language L is undecidable, we can prove that some other language, say L’ , is undecidable, by reducing L’ to L.

Introduction

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We know that A is undecidable. We want to prove B is undecidable. We assume that B is decidable and use this assumption to prove that A is decidable.We conclude that B is undecidable.Note: The reduction is from A to B.

Schematic of a Reduction

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We know that A is undecidable. The only undecidable language we know, so far, is whose undecidability was proven directly. So we pick to play the role of A.We want to prove B is undecidable.

Demonstration

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We want to prove B is undecidable. We pick to play the role of B that is: We want to prove that is undecidable. We assume that B is decidable and use this assumption to prove that A is decidable.

Demonstration

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We assume that B is decidable and use this assumption to prove that A is decidable.In the following slides we assume (towards a contradiction) that is decidable and use this assumption to prove that is decidable.We conclude that B is undecidable.

Demonstration

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ConsiderTheorem is undecidable.ProofBy reducing to .

The “Real” Halting Problem

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Slide11

Assume by way of contradiction that is decidable.Recall that a decidable set has a decider R: A TM that halts on every input and either accepts or rejects, but never loops!.We will use the assumed decider of to devise a decider for .

Discussion

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Slide12

Recall the definition of :Why is it impossible to decide ?Because as long as M runs, we cannot determine whether it will eventually halt.Well, now we can, using the decider R for .

Discussion

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Assume by way of contradiction that is decidable and let R be a TM deciding it. In the next slide we present TM S that uses R as a subroutine and decides . Since is undecidable this constitutes a contradiction, so R does not exist.

Proof

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Slide14

S=“On input where M is a TM: 1. Run R on input until it halts. 2. If R rejects, (i.e. M loops on w ) - reject.(At this stage we know that R accepts, and we conclude that M halts on input w.) 3. Simulate M on w until it halts. 4. If M accepts - accept, otherwise - reject. “

Proof (cont.)

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In the discussion, you saw how Diagonalization can be used to prove that is not decidable. We can use this result to prove by reduction that is not decidable.

Another Example

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Note: Since we already know that both and are undecidable, this new proof does not add any new information. We bring it here only for the the sake of demonstration.

Another Example

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We know that A is undecidable. Now we pick to play the role of A.We want to prove B is undecidable. We pick to play the role of B, that is: We want to prove that is undecidable. We assume that B is decidable and use this assumption to prove that A is decidable.

Demonstration

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We assume that B is decidable and use this assumption to prove that A is decidable.In the following slides we assume that is decidable and use this assumption to prove that is decidable.We conclude that B is undecidable.

Demonstration

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Let R be a decider for . Given an input for , R can be run with this input :If R accepts, it means that .This means that M accepts on input w. In particular, M stops on input w. Therefore, a decider for must accept too.

Discussion

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Slide20

If however R rejects on input , a decider for cannot safely reject: M may be halting on w to reject it. So if M rejects w, a decider for must accept .

Discussion

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How can we use our decider for ?The answer here is more difficult. The new decider should first modify the input TM, M, so the modified TM, , accepts, whenever TM M halts. Since M is a part of the input, the modification must be a part of the computation.

Discussion

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Slide22

Faithful to our principal “ If it ain’t broken don’t fix it”, the modified TM keeps M as a subroutine, and the idea is quite simple:Let and be the accepting and rejecting states of TM M, respectively. In the modified TM, , and are kept as ordinary states.

Discussion

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Slide23

We continue the modification of M by adding a new accepting sate . Then we add two new transitions: A transition from to , and another transition from to . This completes the description of . It is not hard to verify that accepts iff M halts.

Discussion

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Slide24

Discussion

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The final description of a decider S for is:S=“On input where M is a TM: 1. Modify M as described to get . 2. Run R, the decider of with input . 3. If R accepts - accept, otherwise - reject. ”

Discussion

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Slide26

It should be noted that modifying TM M to get , is part of TM S, the new decider for , and can be carried out by it.It is not hard to see that S decides . Since is undecidable, we conclude that is undecidable too.

Discussion

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Slide27

We continue to demonstrate reductions by showing that the language , defined by is undecidable.Theorem is undecidable.

The TM Emptiness Problem

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Slide28

The proof is by reduction from :We know that is undecidable. We want to prove is undecidable. We assume toward a contradiction that is decidable and devise a decider for .We conclude that is undecidable.

Proof Outline

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Slide29

Assume by way of contradiction that is decidable and let R be a TM deciding it. In the next slides we devise TM S that uses R as a subroutine and decides .

Proof

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Slide30

Given an instance for , , we may try to run R on this instance. If R accepts, we know that . In particular, M does not accept w so a decider for must reject .

Proof

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Slide31

What happens if R rejects? The only conclusion we can draw is that . What we need to know though is whether .In order to use our decider R for , we once again modify the input machine M to obtain TM :

Proof

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Slide32

We start with a TM satisfying .

Description of___

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Slide33

Now we add a

filter to divert all inputs but w.

Description of___

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filter

no

yes

Slide34

TM has a filter that rejects all inputs excepts w, so the only input reaching M, is w.Therefore, satisfies:

Proof

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Slide35

Here is a formal description of : “On input x : 1. If - reject . 2. If - run M on w and accept if M accepts. ” Note: M accepts w if and only if .

Proof

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Slide36

This way, if R accepts, S “can be sure” that and accept. Note that S gets the pair as input, thus before S runs R, it should compute an encoding of .This encoding is not too hard to compute using S’s input .

Proof

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Slide37

S=“On input where M is a TM: 1. Compute an encoding of TM . 2. Run R on input . 3. If R rejects - accept, otherwise - reject.

Proof

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Slide38

Recall that R is a decider for . If R rejects the modified machine , , hence by the specification of , , and a decider for must accept .If however R accepts, it means that , hence , and S must reject . QED

Proof

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