Allocations and Calculations in ESSA
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Allocations and Calculations in ESSA

How we arrive at the numbers. CONTENTS. 01. The Federal Appropriations Process. 02. Title I. 03. Title IV. 04. Title IIA. 05. Title III. Contents. The Federal Appropriations Process. 3. The Federal Appropriations Process.

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Allocations and Calculations in ESSA




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Presentation on theme: "Allocations and Calculations in ESSA"— Presentation transcript:

Slide1

Allocations and Calculations in ESSA

How we arrive at the numbers

Slide2

CONTENTS

01

The Federal Appropriations Process

02

Title I

03

Title IV

04

Title IIA

05

Title III

Contents

Slide3

The Federal Appropriations Process

3

The Federal Appropriations Process

Slide4

Before anything can be allocated, the executive and legislative branches work together to appropriate money

4

Slide5

Overall allocations for FY20 are official

News from Washington

Despite President’s proposal to do away with Title IIA and Title IV-A, Congress continues to fund ESSA programs through this year (FY20).Title I: +$100 millionTitle IIA: level fundedTitle III: level fundedTitle IV: +$70 million

FY21 discussions have started. The House has signaled it wants to spend much more on education. But we’re far from a budget deal.

5

Slide6

Caveat: the money follows the population

Congress appropriating more money for ESSA programs is definitely a good thing…

…however, it doesn’t necessarily mean your district will receive more money.6

Slide7

Population in the US: “Go West (and South), Young Man”

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Source: U.S. Census Bureau, 2017

61.7%

38.3%

Slide8

If trends continue, in 2040 half the US will live in 8 states

California

TexasFloridaNew YorkIllinois

GeorgiaPennsylvaniaNorth Carolina

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Slide9

Defining poverty

The various definitions of poverty

The feds use poverty estimates based on the US Census income data (refreshed annually)DESE now uses “economically disadvantaged,” which identifies students who are in state assistance program databases (food stamps, etc.)DESE used free and reduced price lunch (FRPL) eligibility as the measure of “

low income” up until a few years ago. DESE no longer uses FRPL.

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Slide10

Title I: Allocations and Calculations

10

Title I: Allocations and Calculations

Slide11

The allocation process, in general: Title I

The feds start with annual Census Bureau poverty estimates based on:

IncomeFamily sizeFamily compositionNote: the feds only use state SIMS for counts of students that the census cannot get at (neglected, delinquent, foster). Otherwise, they rely solely on census data.

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Slide12

The allocation process, in general: Title I

The feds use a list of school districts with geographic boundaries, associate their Census poverty estimates with those areas, and determine allocation amounts for those select districts.

They send DESE a simple Excel file that includes a list of districts with geographic boundaries, allocation amounts, and poverty population estimates for each.

The term they use for poverty population: “formula children”

12

Slide13

BUT WAIT, SAY YOU!

What about districts without geographic boundaries? Charters, regional vocational schools, etc.?

GOOD QUESTION!The feds direct DESE to adjust the allocations, using state data. It’s now up to DESE to take 298 geographic allocations, and divide them into 408 district allocations.

13

Slide14

Now the Title I ball is in DESE’s court

DESE uses SIMS data to determine the

proportion of K-12 economically disadvantaged students who go to a shared census area district, from a district with geographic boundaries. Those proportions are applied to formula children estimate from the feds.

14

From

FedsDESE AdjustmentMalden3,000 formula children

2,670 formula children

Mystic Valley Charter-(1%) 30 formula children

NE Metro Voc/Tech-(10%) 300 formula children

Note: Data are not real!

Slide15

Phew! We have a file with 408 LEAs, and your formula children.

Now what?

First, we need to determine whether you’re eligible for Title IThough you see one number, Title I is comprised of 4 separate funding components. Eligibility differs for each.15

Slide16

Am I Eligible?

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The Four Components

Eligibility Criteria

Title I: Basic10 formula children AND 2% formula children

Title I: Targeted10 formula children

AND

5% formula childrenTitle I: EFIG*

10 formula children AND 5% formula childrenTitle I: Concentration

Meets

Title I Basic eligibility6,500 formula children OR 15% formula children

*Stands for (Education Finance Incentive Grants)

Slide17

Caveat #2

If your district is hovering anywhere near these eligibility thresholds (10 formula children, 2% formula children, or especially the 5% formula children), you are at risk of losing a big chunk, if not all, of your Title I funding.

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Slide18

Caveat #2

What can you do?

Prepare for the possibility that you might lose these fundsManage expectations!You can’t do much to increase your numbers (remember, formula children are from Census data, not ecodis data)What to look for:Email from DESE to Title I directors each January with preliminary “formula children” estimates, and “warnings”

Your formula children final numbers from the FY20 allocation this coming July (again, emailed to Title I directors)

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Slide19

Warning chart – January 2019

District Name

Last year actual

Preliminary

Basic

ConcentrationTargeted/EFIGAshmont5.88%4.55%OK

N/AWARN ($73,000)

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Slide20

Hold Harmless

Each of the 4 components of Title I have hold homeless provisions,

AS LONG AS YOU ARE ELIGIBLE.If you’re no longer eligible, hold harmless will not apply (except for the Concentration component, where you are held harmless up to 4 years after you lost eligibility)

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%

Formula ChildrenYou will receive29.95% or more95% of what you received last year14.95% to 29.94%

90% of what you received last year

5% to 14.94%85% of what you received last year

Slide21

Hold Harmless: Tip

As long as your are safely eligible, you can plan for at least 85% of last year’s amount.

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Slide22

Several factors influence how much a district ultimately receives

Census estimates

Changes to everyone else (who becomes eligible and who loses eligibility).Number/percentage of students in school districts without geographic borders.Total allocations in each of the 4 grants.Who gets held harmless (the amount needed to hold districts harmless is taken from all of the non-hold-harmless districts)New and expanding charter school reservation.

State admin reservation

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Slide23

Title IVA: Allocations and Calculations

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Title IV-A: Allocations and Calculations

Slide24

The allocation process, in general: Title IV-A

An easy calculation, linked to Title I

Take the prior year’s (not the current year’s) Title I amounts. Determine what percentage of MA’s total Title I allocation you received.Multiple that percentage by the state Title IV-A allocation.

That’s it. In other words, if you received .5% of the total statewide Title I funds last year, you’ll receive .5% of the total Title IV-A funds this year.

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Slide25

Title IIA: Allocations and Calculations

25

Title II-A: Allocations and Calculations

Slide26

The allocation process, in general: Title II-A

A slightly more complex calculation, again linked to Title I.

The Title IIA statewide allocation is split into two parts.20% of the money is distributed by your proportion of enrolled students in the state.80% of the money is distributed by your proportion of “formula children” in the state.

In other words, if your district has .1% of the total enrollment in the state, and .15% of the formula children in the state, you get .1% of 20% of the statewide Title IIA funds, and .15% of 80% of the statewide Title IIA funds.

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Slide27

Title IIIA: Allocations and Calculations

27

Title III-A: Allocations and Calculations

Slide28

The allocation process, in general: Title III-A

Title III is the only ESSA title that uses state data exclusively; no federal Census numbers.

Eligibility100 ELs in your district; orYou’re in a consortium of districts, and your sum total is over 100To those that are eligible, money is distributed on a per-pupil basis

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Slide29

Final Thoughts

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Final Thoughts

Slide30

DESE uses non-public school numbers for certain calculations

DESE is required to incorporate non-public school enrollment numbers into calculations for:

ESSA Title IIIIDEA (special education, not part of ESSA)

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Slide31

Ideas that cause the most confusion

The Census “formula children” numbers/percentage don’t match the state “economically disadvantaged” numbers/percentage

Why a Title I grant award decreased so muchIf you’re still eligible, formula children may have decreased based on Census estimatesYou may have lost eligibility; if you are no longer eligible, you are not held harmless

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Slide32

Questions/Feedback

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Questions/Feedback

Slide33

THANK YOU

781.338.3117

mdeninger@doe.mass.edu

www.doe.mass.edu

75 Pleasant Street, Malden, MA 02148

Matthew Deninger, Director of Resource Allocation Strategy and Planning

Thank you