Expository writing Workshop

Expository writing Workshop Expository writing Workshop - Start

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Expository writing Workshop - Description

Expository writing Workshop Expository Definition : “serving to expound, set forth, or explain” Expository Writing : writing with a purpose to explain a topic or idea If this is the definition of expository, what do you think the definition of ID: 769127 Download Presentation

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Expository writing Workshop




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Expository writing WorkshopExpository Definition: “serving to expound, set forth, or explain” Expository Writing: writing with a purpose to explain a topic or idea If this is the definition of expository, what do you think the definition of expository writing will be?

Organizational Styles1. Compare/Contrast Definition: explain how 2+ more things are alike/ different Example: Explain the types of changes a student may undergo from middle school to high school.As a writer you would have to explain what the student was like before (in middle school) and what student was like after (in high school).

Organizational Styles2. Cause/Effect Definition: identifies one or more causes and the resulting effects Example: Explain the importance of being involved in your community.As a writer you would have to explain what are different things that would cause you to become involved in the community and what the effects of your involvement would be (could be for yourself or for the community as a whole)

Organizational Styles3. Definition Definition: describes characteristics or features of something Example: Explain what it means to be an American.As a writer you would have to explain what are the characteristics that make a person American.

Organizational Styles4. Explanatory Definition: explains a writer’s position on a topic Example: Explain whether second chances are important. As a writer you would need to choose a position to explain. Example : Explain why it’s necessary to give someone a second chance. As a writer you are given the position to explain .

Organizational PatternsRead the four published expository essays provided.Decide what organizational pattern each article follows and complete the designated square for the specific style.

Organizing your Expository essayThesis Statements A thesis statement is crucial to writing a strong essay. Without a thesis your reader will not understand the purpose of your writing. Definition: a single sentence that expresses what you want your readers to understand ; the controlling idea of your essay and road map for your paper Last sentence of your introduction

Organizing your Expository essayThesis Statements What does a thesis look like? ( Basic organization of a thesis) Main idea of paper + transition word + topics/reasons of paper. Examples: Prompt: Explain the types of changes a student may undergo from middle school to high school . Many students undergo changes from middle school to high school such as becoming more responsible and feeling more stress. Prompt: Explain the importance of being involved in your community . Being involved in the community is important because it helps people stay connected and gives people pride in their community.

Let’s Practice!Prompt 1: Write an essay explaining whether second chances are important.Prompt 2: Write an essay explaining why it is sometimes necessary to make sacrifices.

How do I prove my claims?EvidenceDefinition: a specific example used to justify/support your answer. Just like a lawyer wouldn’t go to court without evidence, you can’t write a paper without something to prove that your ideas are true! Types of Evidence 1. Facts and Data: - information that you would research and cite from reliable sources. Ex: 80% of American households have internet access. (from Face the Facts USA) 2. Historical or Literary examples: - using well known examples from history and literature to prove a point Ex: Rosa Parks demonstrates how one woman’s involvement in her community impacted not only a single city but an entire country. 3. Personal examples: - using your own life experiences to relate to your audience Ex: Having to balance school work and basketball practice was one element of my high school experience that caused an increased amount of stress for me.

Let’s Practice!In the space provided in your expository notes, brainstorm evidence examples for the prompts below:Prompt 1: Write an essay explaining whether second chances are important.Prompt 2: Write an essay explaining why it is sometimes necessary to make sacrifices.

How do I prove my claims?AnalysisYour audience can’t read your mind. It is up to you to explain how your evidence proves the point you are trying to make.Definition: explaining to the audience how your evidence connects to your thesis . Using the middle school/high school changes prompt: Good analysis: Many students experience similar juggling acts as I did, trying to succeed both academically and with extra curricular activities. Many students lack the time management skills needed to balance all these activities, leading to an amount of stress that was not experienced in middle school. Weak analysis: Trying to keep up with all my stuff was just crazy. It was really hard to stay focused on all the things I was supposed to do. I don’t remember feeling that way in middle school.

Let’s Practice!In the space provided in your expository notes, write analysis for your evidence:Prompt 1: Write an essay explaining whether second chances are important.Prompt 2: Write an essay explaining why it is sometimes necessary to make sacrifices.

Body Paragraph OrganizationBody paragraphs should follow this basic outline:1.) Topic Sentence – shows the main idea of the paragraph2.) Evidence– facts/data, quotes, examples3.) Analysis– your analysis, explanation, or interpretation of your evidence. 4.) Concluding/Transition Sentence – wraps up the main idea of the paragraph, or leads the reader into the idea of the next paragraph

Body Paragraph OrganizationAn example of an entire paragraph: One negative change that many students experience from middle school to high school is an increased amount of stress.Having to balance school work and basketball practice was one element of my high school experience that caused an increased amount of stress for me. Many students experience similar juggling acts as I did, trying to succeed both academically and with extra curricular activities. Many students lack the time management skills needed to balance all these activities, leading to an amount of stress that was not experienced in middle school . Even though the increased stress can be difficult, learning those time management skills are a valuable life lesson for students.

Purpose: Your reader needs to see how your ideas connect or where your ideas are about to change.Here is a toolbox of strong transition words to use in your writingTherefore Even though However ConsequentlyFurthermore Thus, Hence Strong Transitions


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