Exploratory Factor Analysis PowerPoint Presentation

Exploratory Factor Analysis PowerPoint Presentation

2018-02-23 39K 39 0 0

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Prof. Andy Field. Slide . 2. Aims. Explore factor . a. nalysis and . p. rincipal . c. omponent . a. nalysis (PCA). What . Are . factors. ?. Representing . factors. Graphs and Equations. Extracting factors. ID: 634730

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Presentations text content in Exploratory Factor Analysis

Slide1

Exploratory Factor Analysis

Prof. Andy Field

Slide2

Slide

2

Aims

Explore factor

a

nalysis and

p

rincipal

c

omponent

a

nalysis (PCA)

What

Are

factors

?

Representing

factors

Graphs and Equations

Extracting factors

Methods and Criteria

Interpreting

factor

s

tructures

Factor

Rotation

Reliability

Cronbach’s alpha

Slide3

Slide

3

When and Why?

To test for clusters of variables or measures.

To see whether different measures are tapping aspects of a common dimension.

E.g. Anal-Retentiveness, Number of friends, and social skills might be aspects of the common dimension of ‘statistical ability’

Slide4

R-Matrix

In

f

actor analysis and

PCA

we look to reduce the R-matrix into smaller set of

correlated or uncorrelated

dimensions.

Slide

4

Slide5

Slide

5

Factors and components

Factor analysis attempts to achieve parsimony by explaining the maximum amount of

common variance

in a correlation matrix using the smallest number of explanatory constructs.

T

hese ‘explanatory constructs’

are

called

factors.

PCA tries to explain the maximum amount of total variance

in a correlation matrix.

It does this by transforming the original variables into a set of linear

components

.

Slide6

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6

Graphical Representation

Slide7

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7

Mathematical

Representation, PCA

Slide8

Mathematical Representation Continued

The factors in

f

actor analysis are not represented in the same way as components.

Variables = Variable Means + (Loadings × Common Factor) + Unique Factor

Slide9

Slide

9

Factor Loadings

Both factor analysis and PCA are linear models in which loadings are used as weights.

These loadings can be expressed as a matrix

This matrix is called the factor matrix or component matrix (if doing PCA).

The assumption of factor analysis (but not PCA) is that these algebraic factors represent real-world dimensions.

Slide10

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10

The SAQ

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11

Initial Considerations

The quality of analysis depends upon the quality of the data (GI

GO).

Test variables should correlate quite well

r

>

.

3.

Avoid Multicollinearity:

several variables highly correlated,

r >

.80, tolerance

>

.20.

Avoid Singularity:

some variables perfectly correlated,

r

=

1, tolerance = 0.

Screen the correlation

matrix eliminate

any variables that obviously cause concern

.

Conduct multicollinearity analysis (as in multiple regression, but with case number as the dependent variable).

Slide12

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12

Further Considerations

Determinant:

Indicator of multicollinearity

should be greater than 0.00001.

Kaiser-Meyer-Olkin (KMO):

Measures sampling adequacy

should be greater than 0.5.

Bartlett’s Test of Sphericity:

Tests whether the R-matrix is an identity matrix

should be significant at

p <

.05.

Anti-Image Matrix:

Measures of sampling adequacy on diagonal,

Off-diagonal elements should be small.

Reproduced:

Correlation matrix after rotation

most residuals should be < |0.05|

Slide13

Slide

13

Finding Factors: Communality

Common Variance:

Variance that a variable shares with other variables.

Unique Variance

:

Variance that is unique to a particular variable

.

The proportion of common variance in a variable is called the communality

.

Communality = 1, All variance shared.Communality = 0, No variance shared.

0 < Communality < 1 = Some variance shared.

Slide14

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14

Variance of

Variable 1

Variance of

Variable 2

Variance of

Variable 3

Variance of

Variable 4

Communality = 1

Communality

= 0

Slide15

Slide

15

Finding

Factors

We find factors by calculating the amount of common variance

Circularity

Principal Components Analysis:

Assume all variance is shared

All Communalities = 1

Factor Analysis

Estimate Communality

Use Squared Multiple Correlation (SMC)

Slide16

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16

Slide17

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17

Factor Extraction

Kaiser’s

extraction

Kaiser (1960): retain factors with

eigenvalues

> 1.

Scree

plot

Cattell (1966): use ‘point of inflexion’ of the scree plot.

Which

rule?

Use

Kaiser’s

extraction whenless than 30 variables, communalities after extraction > 0.7.

sample size > 250 and mean communality

0.6.

Scree plot is good if sample size is > 200

.

Parallel

analysis

Supported by SPSS macros written in SPSS syntax (O’Connor, 2000)

Slide18

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18

Slide19

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19

Scree Plots

Slide20

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20

Rotation

To aid interpretation it is possible to maximise the loading of a variable on one factor while minimising its loading on all other factors

This is known as Factor Rotation

There are two types:

Orthogonal

(factors are uncorrelated)

Oblique

(factors intercorrelate)

Slide21

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21

Orthogonal

Oblique

Slide22

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22

Before Rotation

Slide23

Orthogonal

Rotation (varimax)

Slide

23

Slide24

Oblique Rotation

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24

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25

Reliability

Test-Retest Method

What about practice effects/mood states?

Alternate Form Method

Expensive and Impractical

Split-Half Method

Splits the questionnaire into two random halves, calculates scores and correlates them.

Cronbach’s

alpha

Splits the questionnaire into all possible halves, calculates the scores, correlates them and averages the correlation for all splits (well, sort of …).

Ranges from 0 (no reliability) to 1 (complete reliability)

Slide26

Cronbach’s Alpha

Slide

26

Slide27

Slide

27

Interpreting Cronbach’s Alpha

Kline (1999)

Reliable if

>

.7

Depends on the number of

items

More questions = bigger

 is *not* a measure of unidimensionality

Treat subscales

separately

Remember to reverse score reverse phrased items!

If not,  is reduced and can even be negative

Slide28

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28

Reliability for Fear of Computers Subscale

Slide29

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29

Reliability for Fear of Statistics Subscale

Slide30

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30

Reliability for Fear of Maths Subscale

Slide31

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31

Reliability for the Peer Evaluation Subscale

Slide32

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32

The End?

Describe Factor Structure/Reliability

What items should be retained?

What items did you eliminate and why?

Application

Where will your questionnaire be used?

How does it fit in with psychological theory?

Slide33

Slide

33

Conclusion

PCA and FA to reduce a larger set of measured variables to a smaller set of underlying dimensions

In PCA, components summarise information from set of variables

In FA, factors are underlying dimensions

How many factors to extract?

Rotation

Interpretation

Reliability analysis after PCA/FA


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