Soviet  Montage  1924-1930

Soviet Montage 1924-1930 - Description

Soviet Cinema in the 1920s. Vibrant film culture . after Russian Revolution. Lenin: . cinema . would . be the most important . art . in the effort to reunite his . nation. power to attract and instruct/indoctrinate . ID: 632027 Download Presentation

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Soviet Montage 1924-1930

Soviet Cinema in the 1920s. Vibrant film culture . after Russian Revolution. Lenin: . cinema . would . be the most important . art . in the effort to reunite his . nation. power to attract and instruct/indoctrinate .

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Soviet Montage 1924-1930




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Presentation on theme: "Soviet Montage 1924-1930"— Presentation transcript:

Slide1

Soviet

Montage

1924-1930

Slide2

Soviet Cinema in the 1920sVibrant film culture after Russian RevolutionLenin: cinema

would be the most important art in the effort to reunite his nationpower to attract and instruct/indoctrinate

Influential developments in film

theory:

Character and Society

Education/Propaganda

The

Kuleshov

Effect

Montage Editing

Slide3

Soviet Film Theory: Character and SocietyDownplay

individual characters characters are shown as members of society and of different social classes

Slide4

Soviet Film Theory: Education/PropagandaNationalized

film industry, established a national film schoolAll-Russian State University of Cinematography (VGIK)Leaders saw film as key to involving all in political and intellectual revolution

Basic

storyline: triumph of the people over bourgeois oppression

“Art is not a mirror which reflects the historical struggle, but a weapon of that struggle

” --

Dziga

Vertov

(contemporary of Eisenstein)

Slide5

Soviet Film Theory: The Kuleshov Effect

Lev Kuleshov teacher at VGIKCentral belief: the viewer’s response in cinema

depends less on the individual shot

and

more on the editing or

montage

Famous experiment with shot

juxtapositions:

First shot: c/u of actor with neutral expression, then joined this shot to:

c/u of a bowl of soup

c/u of a coffin with a corpse

c/u of a little girl playing

Slide6

…The Kuleshov EffectTest audiences praised the actor’s versatility in showing hunger, sorrow, and pride, even though the shot of the actor remained exactly the same each time

Hitchcock (+)

Definition: One of the basic theoretical principles of editing – the meaning produced by joining two shots together transcends the visual information contained in each individual shot

(A+B=C)

Slide7

Soviet Film Theory: The MontageBelieved in the

power of montage:manipulate the viewer’s perception and understandingAudiences can derive meaning from juxtaposition of two completely unrelated shots

Slide8

…The MontageMeaning created by juxtaposition of shots, not the content of individual images

Sound and visuals can be treated independently or used together

Footage and music can

be

put together

to increase the impact of a key shot

rhythm

of music can accent the rhythm of

editing/the montage (

Marie A

) (

Rushmore)

Slide9

Sergei EisensteinStrike (1924)

Battleship Potemkin (1925)October (1927)The General Line

(1928

)

equal to Griffith as a pioneering genius

financed by the soviet government

Slide10

Sergei Eisenstein

regarded

film editing as a creative

and artistic process

:

one

shot (thesis) collides with another shot of opposing

content

(antithesis) to produce a new idea (synthesis)

forces

the viewer to reach

conclusions

Battleship Potemkin ~47-52,

ch

15 (

or 3:52

)

Slide11

And… The History of Montage

“Best Montages Ever”