“Brother, Can You Spare a Dime” - PowerPoint Presentation

“Brother, Can You Spare a Dime”
“Brother, Can You Spare a Dime”

“Brother, Can You Spare a Dime” - Description


By Yip Harburg Caitlin Cumberland They used to tell me I was building a dream and so I followed the mob When there was earth to plow or guns to bear I was always there right on the job ID: 137022 Download Presentation

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built song spare time song built time spare war dime historical brother songs remember yip verse slogging literary tower railroad khaki buddy

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Slide1

“Brother, Can You Spare a Dime”

By: Yip Harburg

Caitlin CumberlandSlide2

They used to tell me I was building a dream, and so I followed the mob,

When there was earth to plow, or guns to bear, I was always there right on the job. They used to tell me I was building a dream, with peace and glory ahead, Why should I be standing in line, just waiting for bread?

Once I built a railroad

, I made it run, made it

race

against

time

.

Once I built a

railroad

; now it's done. Brother, can you spare a dime?

Once I built a tower, up to the sun, brick, and rivet, and lime;

Once I built a tower, now it's done. Brother, can you spare a dime?

Once in

khaki suits

, gee we looked swellSlide3

Full of that Yankee Doodly Dum, Half a million boots went

slogging through Hell, And I was the kid with the drum! Say, don't you remember, they called me Al; it was Al all the time. Why don't you remember, I'm your pal? Buddy, can you spare a dime?

Once in khaki suits, gee we looked swell,

Full of that

Yankee Doodly Dum

,

Half a million boots went

slogging through Hell

,

And I was the

kid with the drum

!

Say, don't you remember, they called me Al; it was Al all the time.

Say, don't you remember, I'm your pal? Buddy, can you spare a dime?Slide4

CitationsSlide5

Yip Harburg

(1896-1981)Born Edgar Yipsel Harburg in Manhattan's Lower East Side, Yip started writing songs as early as 1929. After the Stock Market Crash of 1929, Yip and his good friend Ira Gershwin, were left high in debt. Insisting on paying it back, Yip and Ira turned to a different road for raising the money. Together, they began writing songs. After having gotten a chance to write songs for “Earl Carroll’s Sketchbook”, his talent was proven. Next, he began to write songs for the Broadway feature,

Americana

. For this show, he wrote “Brother Can You Spare A Dime”, which was performed by Jay Gorney. The song was to the tune of a childhood lullaby he was sung while living in Russia. It was inspired by his socialist beliefs and expressed how he felt about human rights and equality. Even though he started from poverty, amazingly his song became the national song of the depression of the time. One of his biggest accomplishments was creating the songs for

The Wizard Of Oz.

Over his lifetime, he had written an accomplishing 600 songs. He died on March 5, 1981 at the age of 84.

BackSlide6

“So I followed the mob”Back

Literary:

This line is an example of a theme. A

theme

is the central idea of a story, song, poem, etc. This verse shows how every man had the same outlook on what was going to happen from this war, however their dreams were crushed. Slide7

“Why should I be standing in line”Once powerful men, who fought in wars and built the city from the ground up, were now reduced to waiting in soup and bread lines. Men of this time were embarrassed, but also dumbfounded. They were told that things would get better after the war, however they soon realized they were mistaken.

Historical:

BackSlide8

“Once I built a railroad”An

anaphora is a repetition of words or phrases at the beginning of a line.In this part of the song, the omniscient man is repeating over and over everything he had accomplished before. Looking back at these things, showed his once known strength, but now they do not mean anything.

Literary:

BackSlide9

“Time,dime,lime,dime”“Once I built a railroad, I made it run, made it race against time. Once I built a railroad; now it's done. Brother, can you spare a dime? Once I built a tower, up to the sun, brick, and rivet, and lime; Once I built a tower, now it's done. Brother, can you spare a dime?”

This is an example of rhyme scheme. In this particular song, the pattern is AAAA. Rhyme scheme is a pattern of rhyming words or phrases.

Literary

:

BackSlide10

“Khaki Suits”The song says “once in khaki suits, gee we looked so swell.” This is referring back to World War 1 and the excitement of the soldiers during this time. They believed this war was going to be a solution to the tough times.

Historical:

BackSlide11

“Say don’t you remember”This verse of the song is an example of an

Apostrophe. An Apostrophe is when a line refers to an omniscient person or reaches out to the audience. When this soldier says “say don’t you remember” he is calling out to the people, asking if they remember this time too.Literary:

BackSlide12

“Buddy”Back in World War 1 and 2, the term “buddy” was used to describe a military friend. This whole song is relating to war and the depression, so by saying buddy it is referring to a military buddy, or a friend.

Historical:

BackSlide13

“Yankee Doodly Dum”This verse of the song connects to two different historical events:

1)It relates to the propaganda and excitement of the Americans going into war.2) It also connects to the song “Yankee Doddle Dandy”, where it says “full of macaroni” because they were once very happy about the circumstances, but now they are not.

Historical

:

BackSlide14

“Slogging through Hell”Historical:

This verse relates to how the Americans were heading towards their glory, but later find themselves “slogging through hell”. It also shows how they felt going through the rough situations in the trenches.

BackSlide15

“Kid with the drum”Historical:

During the war, the boys with the drums were used to warn the armies when they were about to be attacked. They were in charge of transporting urgent messages as well. Boys as young as seven were recruited, and the average age was 12.

Back

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