Don’t Weight to Lose: A practical weight loss and nutriti

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Courseault, J.. 1. , Jupiter, R.. 1. , Rabito, F., PhD. 2. . 1. Tulane University School of Medicine, . 2. School of Public Health, New Orleans, Louisiana. Introduction. . Purpose. References. ID: 295320 Download Presentation

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Don’t Weight to Lose: A practical weight loss and nutriti

Courseault, J.. 1. , Jupiter, R.. 1. , Rabito, F., PhD. 2. . 1. Tulane University School of Medicine, . 2. School of Public Health, New Orleans, Louisiana. Introduction. . Purpose. References.

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Don’t Weight to Lose: A practical weight loss and nutriti




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Don’t Weight to Lose: A practical weight loss and nutrition awareness program designed for church members

Courseault, J.1, Jupiter, R.1, Rabito, F., PhD2 1Tulane University School of Medicine, 2School of Public Health, New Orleans, Louisiana

Introduction

Purpose

References

Discussion

Methods

Results

Don’t Weight to Lose

is an 9-week program designed to incorporate recommendations from previous studies in order to promote self-efficacy and long-term behavior change in dieting and exercise habits. Church-based health programs have shown to be holistically effective in eliminating ethnic health disparities. This study evaluates the effectiveness of this program in (1) increasing weight loss, (2) increasing fat free mass, (3) increasing fruit and vegetable intake, (4) and decreasing body fat %.

To evaluate the effectiveness of:

High-intensity 20 minute 3x/week resistance band exercise (8 second repetitions, moderate to heavy resistance, 2 sets)

High-intensity 20 minute 3x/week cardiovascular exercise (75-90% full effort pace) on body fat%, fat free mass and weight loss, and also to determine adherence to practical changes in dietary recommendations on fruit and vegetable intake.

High-intensity resistance and cardiovascular exercise are effective weight loss interventions in church-based health programs. Practical recommendations in nutrition promote an increase in fruit and vegetable intake from baseline. Diuretic use, obesity, and daily habits interfere with body fluids that are calculated with bioelectric impedance, which may explain negative outcomes in body fat% and fat free mass.

Don’t Weight to Lose

prescriptions in weight loss and nutrition promote healthy behaviors in the church community.

Berggren, R., Curiel, T. (2006) After the Storm- Health Care Infrastructure in Post-Katrina New Orleans. The New England Journal of Medicine. 354;15, 1549-1552

Dean, D., Jorgensen, K., Loose, D., Duffy, M. (2000). Local Health Planning: A report of a collaborative process between a university and a church. Family Community Health. 10(4); 13-22.

Dunstan, D., Daly R., Owen N., Jolly D., De Courten M., Shaw J., Zimmet Pl (2002). High-intensity resistance training improves glycemic control in older patients with type 2 diabetes. Diabetes Care. 25(10):1729-36.

Hagerman, F., Walsh, S., Staron, R., Hikida, R., Gilders, R., Murray, T., Toma, K., and Ragg, K., (2000). Effects of High-Intensity Resistance Training on Untrained Older Men. 55:B336-B346.

Hilton, W. (1988). Learning How to Develop a Local Health Ministry Program and Linking with State and National Agendas. Nebraska Health and Human Services System. Annual Meeting of the American Alliance for Health, Physical Education, Recreation and Dance.

U.S. Department of Health and Human Services. The Surgeon General’s call to action to prevent and decrease overweight and obesity. [Rockville, MD]: U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, Public Health Service, Office of the Surgeon General; [2001]. Available from: U.S. GPO, Washington.

Acknowledgements:

Timothy Harlan, M.D., Corey Hebert, M.D., and Otis Drew, M.D. Tulane University School of Medicine Student National Medical Association Pfizer Franklin Avenue Baptist Church New Orleans, Louisiana City of New Orleans Health Department

102 overweight/obese adults from Franklin Avenue Baptist Church in New Orleans participated in the study. Body composition, hip circumference and fruit and vegetable intake were determined at baseline, 3 weeks, 5 weeks, and 8 weeks. Data was analyzed for those attending 3 of 3 body composition sessions.

Figure 1

:

Health status reported by participants during the initial assessment phase

50 (49%) attended 3 of 3 body composition sessions. Significant improvements were noted in areas of weight loss (-9.4lbs), hip circumference (-2.5 inches) and fruit and vegetable intake (+3.0). Body fat % (+1.94%) and fat free mass (-10.58) were shown to have negative outcomes.

Figure 2

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Participants actively engage in a speaker session given by Dr. Corey Hebert on Stress Management.

Figure 3: Participants are taught how to effectively use the exercise equipment for the slow burn exercise technique.

Figure 4: Highly efficient Tanita scale used to measure body compositions during sessions biweekly.

Mission Statement

To initiate and maintain an effective long-term health program based on scientific research and the specific needs of the New Orleans community. 

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