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Why Picture Books

Picture books are non threatening (shorter, pictures). Picture books are focused. Picture books set a purpose for learning. Picture books provide a common knowledge background. Picture books activate thinking on a visual level.

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Why Picture Books






Presentation on theme: "Why Picture Books"— Presentation transcript:

Slide1

Why Picture Books

Picture books are non threatening (shorter, pictures)

Picture books are focused

Picture books set a purpose for learning

Picture books provide a common knowledge background

Picture books activate thinking on a visual level

Picture books build reading comprehension

Picture books provide examples of figurative language and writing techniques

Picture books can breathe life into dry facts and figures

Picture books can make abstract concepts concrete

Picture books can teach critical thinking skills

Picture books can tell their stories with amazing illustrations

Picture books are fun Slide2

Universal themes

(

Picture books Across the Curriculum p.16)

Abandonment

Acceptance

Accomplishment

Adventure

Anxiety

Appreciation

Appreciation of

Nature

Attitude

Balance

Belonging

Brotherhood

Cause and Effect

Challenge

Change

Choices

Collaboration

Coming of Age

Commitment

Communication

Community Culture

Compassion

Compromise

Concern

Conflict

Conflict Resolution

Conformity

Connections

Consequences

Consideration

Cooperation

Courage

Cycles

Denial

Determination

Devotion

Differences

Dignity

Discovery

Empathy

Enthusiasm

Environment

Escape

Excellence

Exploration

Facing Fear

Fairness

Faith

Fame

Family

Fear

Forgiveness

Freedom

Friendship

Generations

Goals

Gratitude

Heroism

Honesty

Honor

Hope

Humility

Humor

Identity

Imagination

Individuality

Influence

Ingenuity

Initiation

Innocence

Innovation

Inspiration

Integrity

Interdependence

Isolation

Justice

Kindness

Leadership

Loneliness

Loss

Love

Loyalty

Magnitude

Memory

Nature

New Experiences

Opportunity

Optimism

Order vs. Chaos

Origins

Parallelism

Patience

Patriotism

Patterns

Peace

Peer Pressure

Perseverance

Perspectives

Point of View

Possibilities

Power

Prejudice

Pride

Problem Solving

Reciprocity

Reflection

Relationships

Relativity

Resourcefulness

Respect

Responsibility

Self Awareness

Self Discipline

Self Esteem

Self Respect

Self Sacrifice

Sensitivity

Social Change

Structure

Success

Survival

Sympathy

Systems

Tolerance

Tradition

Tragedy

Transformation

Uncertainty

Virtue

Wisdom

WorkSlide3

Writing T

echniques

Adding details -Adding a details after a fact makes it more interesting to read

Similes -

Using like or as to compare two things that are not really alike (wise as an owl, busy as a bee

)

Anchor

lines- a repeated line throughout a story

(There was an old lady who swallowed a …)

First Impressions- books that start with a problem, dialogue or conversation, simple statement or fact, a question, an action , a sound

Voice- Characters have a voice and give great meaning to the story

Six

senses- Words that describe the six senses (sight, sound, taste, smell, touch, feeling)

vocabulary

Writing

in the third person – First person is when the writer is telling the story, third person is when the person sounds like they are outside of the story Slide4

Writing T

echniques

Personification- when writers write about an object as if it were a person , they add human qualities to an inanimate object (The Tortoise and the Hare)

Dialogue- when characters are talking in a story

Onomatopoeia- when the writer uses sound words (oink, bang)

Alliteration – Repetition of initial consonant sounds (she sells seashells by the seashore)

 Flashback- Interruption of a present action to insert an event that happened earlier to make the current situation make sense

Irony- A contrast - between expectation and reality- between what is said and what is meant, between what appears to be true and what really is true, between what is expected and what actually happens. Cinderella is a good example. Parody – a humorous , but recognisable, imitation of literature, art or music for the purpose of amusement or ridicule. The True Story of the Three little Pigs and fractured fairy tales

Slide5

Activities

1.Distribute and read over the handout

2. Divide into two small groups. Each teacher will read a story. Listen to the story and record examples of literary devices on the handout.

Suggested read

alouds

The

Matchbox Diary- 10 min Students: Think about the universal theme(s) in the and look for writing techniquesThe Peace Book- Todd Parr- 10 min for both stories Students: Think about the universal theme(s) in the and look for writing

techniques

Mmm

, Cookies!-

Rober

Munsch

Students: Think about the universal theme(s) in the and look for writing techniquesSlide6

Whole Class Activity

Explore and read the picture books

find examples of all the writing techniques (if you can) and record on blackline masterwrite down the main universal theme “big idea” of the

stories you read

on blackline master

Closing: Present

a book of choice

- Share the universal theme and writing techniques used (can read the whole story or just summarise) Slide7

References

Workshop notes from

Picture Books Across the Curriculum, presented by Keith Schoch

Reading and Writing Power

by Adrienne Geer