White collar crimes White Collar Crimes

White collar crimes White Collar Crimes White collar crimes White Collar Crimes - Start

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White collar crimes White Collar Crimes - Description

". White collar crime" can describe a wide variety of crimes, but they all typically involve crime committed through deceit and motivated by financial gain. . The most common white collar crimes are various types of fraud, embezzlement, tax evasion and money laundering. ID: 638583 Download Presentation

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White collar crimes White Collar Crimes




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Presentations text content in White collar crimes White Collar Crimes

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White collar crimes

Slide2

White Collar Crimes

"

White collar crime" can describe a wide variety of crimes, but they all typically involve crime committed through deceit and motivated by financial gain.

The most common white collar crimes are various types of fraud, embezzlement, tax evasion and money laundering

.

Often thought of as “Victimless” crimes

Slide3

Fraud

Fraud is a general type of crime which generally involves deceiving someone for monetary gain.

One

common type of white collar fraud is securities fraud.

Slide4

Identity Fraud

Using a variety of methods, criminals steal credit card numbers, driver's license numbers, social security numbers, ATM cards, telephone calling cards and other key pieces of individuals' identities.

They

use this information to impersonate their victims, spending as much money as they can in as short a time as possible.

Maximum penalty of 15 years and fines

Slide5

Securities Fraud

Securities Fraud: a person or company (like a stockbroker or brokerage firm) misrepresents information that investors use to make decisions

Punishment:

Fines range from $10,000 to $5 million

Incarceration in local prison or, if large enough fraud, 5 or more years in federal prison

Probation for 5 or more years

Restitution: repayment of money lost in

crime

Slide6

Forgery

The process of making, adapting, or imitating something with the intent to deceive with the purpose of earning a profit by selling the forged item, or altering public perception.

Sentencing

The maximum for felony forgery is three years, but varies from case to case.

Some may be given probation, depends on the case.

Slide7

Money Laundering

Money laundering is a term used to describe a scheme in which criminals try to disguise the identity, original ownership, and destination of money that they have obtained through criminal conduct. The punishment for this would be rigorous imprisonment from three years to seven years.

Example:

Illegal gambling, and drug trafficking

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Tax Evasion

Definition- the illegal nonpayment or underpayment of tax

Penalty- A criminal convicted of tax evasion will be guilty of a felony. They will also be imprisoned no more than 5 years

Activities

include:

Underreporting

income

Inflating deductions or expenses

Hiding money

Hiding interest in offshore accounts

Slide9

Cyber Crime

Criminal activities carried out by means of computers or the internet

Perpetrators can be sentenced no time to 20 years in prison

Examples

Black market

workers

Stealing personal information

Hacking/Spying

Disabling hospitals, banks, and 9-1-1 services

Slide10

Credit Card Fraud

Definition: a form of identity theft that involves an unauthorized taking of another’s credit card information for the purpose of charging purchases to the account or removing funds from

it

Prison Sentence:

Minor Offense: Maximum fine of $1,000 and a sentence of up to 1 year in jail

As the value of property received increases, so does the penalty

Maximum fine of $25,000 and a sentence of up to 15 years in

jail

Slide11

Types of white collar crimes

Securities Fraud

Tax Evasion

Money Laundering

Identity Fraud

Slide12

Mob Related Crimes

Al Capone

Henry Hill

John

Gotti

Mickey Cohen

Lucky Luciano

Carlo Gambino

Frank Costello

Slide13

In groups of two, you will be researching and creating a brief PowerPoint presentations on both a white collar crime (I will assign them), and a mobster/the crimes they commit

Slide14

Tony “Big Tuna” Accardo

Accardo

came to infamy as a hitman for Al Capone who allegedly participated in the Valentine's Day Massacre. Never convicted of his crimes,

Accardo

denied any ties to the mob until his death in 1992.

CRIME: Hitman

: a person who is paid to kill someone, especially for a criminal or political organization.

Slide15

Mickey Cohen

He was born into an Orthodox Jewish family living in the Jewish Brownsville section of Brooklyn.

Was a boxer as a teenager

Cohen went to Chicago, where he ran a gambling operation for the Chicago Outfit, Al Capone's powerful criminal organization.

Crimes: Cohen

was convicted of tax evasion and was sentenced to four years in federal prison in 1951

.

Slide16

John Gotti

Italian-American gangster who became boss of the Gambino crime family in New York City.

Gotti

and his brothers grew up in poverty and turned to a life of crime at an early age

CRIMES:

Hijacking and sentenced to 3 years in prison

Murder (1973)

Gave Names and Charged with attempted manslaughter and sentenced to 4 years in prison

Federal indictments for racketeering (Offering Dishonest Service)

-

Gambling, Drug Trafficking, Extortion, and stock fraud

- Life in Prison and then died in the federal prison hospital in 2002

Slide17

Henry Hill

June 11, 1943 - June 12, 2012

Weaseled

his way

into the mafia

Used prison contacts to transfer cocaine from Brooklyn to Pittsburgh

CRIME- Drug

trafficking - global illicit trade involving the cultivation, manufacture and sale of substances which are subject to drug prohibition laws

Made between $15,000 and $40,000 a week

Book and movie based off of his life called “

Goodfella’s

Made $550,000

Was kicked out of Witness Protection

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Al Capone

Born in 1899 in Brooklyn, New York

American mobster, crime boss, and businessman

Most infamous gangster in American History

Also involved in prostitution and gambling

Responsible for many acts of violence mainly against other gangsters

Most famous of these were the

St.Valentine’s

Day Massacre

Finally brought to justice for income tax evasion

Illegal underpayment or nonpayment of taxes

This is the only thing he was charged with

Slide19

Frank “The Prime Minister” Costello

Tax Evasion

a person, organization or corporation intentionally avoids paying his true tax liability

Embezzlement

theft or misappropriation of funds placed in one's trust or belonging to one's employer.

Gambling Enterprise

Set up thousands of slots throughout New York

Managed bookie operation

Slide20

Carlo Gambino

Crimes

Illegal gambling

Narcotics trafficking

Hijacking: taking over a vehicle and using it for a different purpose than what it was intended

Orchestrated murder

Conspiracy to commit murder: an agreement between people to commit murder

Ran illegal liquor (during prohibition)

Hitman: a person hired to kill someone or commit a major crime

Abduction and murder


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