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2.0 Incident management Principles

Tripr. Flammable Liquid unit Trains. Neither the U.S. Department of Transportation Pipeline Hazardous Materials Safety Administration (PHMSA), the Federal . Railroad . Administration (FRA), TRANSCAER®, American Petroleum Institute (API), Association of American Railroads (AAR) or the Renewable Fuels Association (RFA) or any of their employees, subcontractors, consultants, or other assigns make any warranty or representation, either express or implied, with respect to the accuracy, completeness, or utility of the information contained herein, or assume any liability or responsibility for any use, or the results of such use, of any information or process disclosed in this publication, or represent that its use would not infringe upon privately owned rights..

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2.0 Incident management Principles






Presentation on theme: "2.0 Incident management Principles"— Presentation transcript:

Slide1

2.0 Incident management Principles

Tripr

high Hazard flammable TrainsSlide2

Neither the U.S. Department of Transportation Pipeline Hazardous Materials Safety Administration (PHMSA), the Federal

Railroad

Administration (FRA), TRANSCAER®, American Petroleum Institute (API), Association of American Railroads (AAR) or the Renewable Fuels Association (RFA) or any of their employees, subcontractors, consultants, or other assigns make any warranty or representation, either express or implied, with respect to the accuracy, completeness, or utility of the information contained herein, or assume any liability or responsibility for any use, or the results of such use, of any information or process disclosed in this publication, or represent that its use would not infringe upon privately owned rights.This information is designed to supplement existing training resources and should not be relied upon exclusively as a standalone curriculum. Sound scientific and safety judgment should be used in employing the information contained herein. Where applicable, authorities having jurisdiction should be consulted.Neither PHMSA, FRA, TRANSCAER®, API, AAR nor RFA are undertaking to meet the duties of employers, manufacturers, or suppliers to warn and properly train and equip their employees, and others exposed, concerning health and safety risks and precautions, nor undertaking their obligations to comply with authorities having jurisdiction.

DisclaimerSlide3

Describe the critical tasks

pertaining to initial site management and control in managing the response to a

rail transportation accident involving Hazard Class 3 flammable liquids, such as crude oil and ethanol.Identify the subordinate command and general staff positions that might be utilized for a rail incident ensuring consistency with the National Incident Management System (NIMS) Incident Command System (ICS) as a framework to manage the event.Describe how federal response partners may provide assistance including providing Incident Management Teams for managing complex incidents.

ObjectivesSlide4

Establishes a

scalable, flexible, and adaptable set of processes

and procedures that emergency responders will use to conduct response operations.Enables responders at all levels to work together more effectively and efficiently to manage events.National incident management systemSlide5

USEPA and USCG Federal On-Scene Coordinators (FOSCs) have the authority to lead oil and hazardous substance

response.

FOSCs provide technical and contract support to local ICs early in an incident and will be prominent in Unified Command.Can direct all Responsible Party response actions.Coordinate with affected Tribes and States.Can mobilize highly trained Type 1 and 2 Incident Management Teams.Can request and fund support from other state and federal agencies.The National Response SystemSlide6

Initial site command and control

Follow

guidance in the DOT Emergency Response GuidebookFollow the National Incident Management System (NIMS)Incident Management PrinciplesSlide7

Anticipate Federal/State On-Scene Coordinators in Unified Command

Other Federal cooperating or assisting agencies

State, Tribal, and municipal agenciesRailroad will integrate assets into NIMS structure as determined by the UC based on the IncidentWill likely require activation of Emergency Operations Center (EOC)Incident Management Principles (Cont’d)Slide8

Incident Command SystemSlide9

Unified Command offers the following advantages:

A

shared understanding of priorities and restrictionsA single set of incident objectivesCollaborative strategiesImproved internal and external information flowLess duplication of effort

Better resource utilization

Unified commandSlide10

Single vs. unified command

Single Incident Commander

Unified Command

The Incident Commander is:

Solely responsible (within the confines of his or her authority) for establishing incident objectives and strategies.

Directly responsible for ensuring that all functional area activities are directed toward accomplishment of the strategy.

The individuals designated by their jurisdictional or organizational authorities work together to:

Determine objectives, strategies, plans, resource allocations, and priorities.

Execute integrated incident operations and maximize the use of assigned resources.Slide11

On-Scene Incident Commander (Local Fire)On-Scene Coordinators

(

OSC)Federal OSC from USEPA/USCGState OSCResponsible PartyA Senior Transportation Officer will act as the lead railroad official.Unified command for rail incidentsSlide12

Railroad emergency responders are trained and prepared to operate within NIMS/ICS.Railroads will be part of Unified Command.

Railroad will provide resources.

Engage with railroads during planning and preparedness phase to understand capabilities.Importance of integrating RailroadsRail Road OffSlide13

The four major organizational components

to a typical railroad response are:

TransportationMechanicalEngineeringSafety or Risk Management Railroad ResourcesSlide14

Hands on classroom activity (Example)

Municipal Fire

Chief

On-Scene Coordinator

Senior Transportation

Officer

Joint Safety

Joint PIO

Joint PIO

Joint Safety

Finance

Finance

Operations

Operations

Logistics

Logistics

Planning

Planning

Railroad

Branch

Railroad Branch

Transportation

Transportation

Mechanical

Mechanical

Engineering

Engineering

Risk Management

Risk Management

Fire Branch

Fire Branch

Fire

Fire

Rescue

Rescue

1.

2.

3.

4.

5.

6.

7.

8.

9.

10.

11.

12.

13.

14.

EXAMPLE:

UC

would decide

how the railroad resources would be organized based

on the event.Slide15

Federal, State, and Regional Incident Management Teams

(IMT

) provide planning, logistics, and incident management support to the IC/UC.Regional and State IMTs have resources and capabilities to assist.USCG/EPA, state, local responders, and railroad will integrate into an IMT as an incident progresses.incident management TeamsSlide16

AHIMT are valuable resources that

can support major

disasters and assist local and regional responders. AHIMT are specialists in applying incident management principles to complex events.All-hazards Incident management teamSlide17

Commodity Preparedness and Incident Management Reference SheetIncident Management

Reference sheet recapSlide18

All agencies involved in emergency response operations need to understand NIMS, their specific role within NIMS, and be represented at the ICP.

A

Unified Command Structure, including the responsible party, will be essential. Distinguish between an all hazards/chemical incident and an oil spill incident in the planning process. Each requires distinct response assets. Know your Mutual Aid Agreements and assets that other jurisdictions and agencies can provide. Participate in joint planning, training and exercises whenever possible.Lesson learned & Responder tipsSlide19

In this module we presented the following information:How to identify tasks

pertaining to initial site

command and control in managing the response to a rail transportation accident involving hazardous products such as crude oil and ethanol. Identification of the key subordinate command and general staff positions that would be utilized for a rail incident and application of the National Incident Management System (NIMS) Incident Command System (ICS) as a framework to manage events.Summary