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Behavioral Health Campaign:. Issues of Women Returning from Combat. Paula McBride. Community Support Coordinator Oklahoma & Arkansas. Objectives. Provide background on the Army OneSource Behavioral Health Campaign, the war and its impact. ID: 461086 Download Presentation

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Slide1

Army OneSource Behavioral Health Campaign:Issues of Women Returning from CombatPaula McBrideCommunity Support Coordinator Oklahoma & Arkansas

Slide2

Objectives

Provide background on the Army OneSource Behavioral Health Campaign, the war and its impact

Explain

the history of women in combat

and

the scope of the

problem

Describe

the importance of military

culture

Identify

psychological issues unique to women returning from

combat

Discuss

gender-specific

treatment

Provide information on

mental health care resources including

TRICARE

insurance

Slide3

Behavioral Health Campaign

Raise awareness of the challenges of Military life before, during and after deployment

Engage health professionals and others in providing specialized services to Service Members and their Families

Fill gaps in health services available to Service Members, especially those who live far from Military installations

Slide4

A Different War

Already lasted longer than WWII

Improvised Explosive Devices (IEDs) / no front line

No down time / constant vigilance

All volunteer force

Multiple and longer deployments

90% of wounded surviving their injuries

Slide5

Impact on Service Members

Over 1 ½ million

have served in Iraq and Afghanistan

75% experienced situations where they could be seriously injured or killed

62% know someone who was seriously injured or killed

33% described an event that caused intense fear, helplessness or horror

Greater percentage coming home with Traumatic Brain Injury (TBI), post traumatic stress, and depression

Slide6

Public Health Issue

Demands for services outpace the capacity of the Military

Over 1 million veterans eligible for VA services

45% actually seek services from the VA

Half of all Service Members experience multiple deployments

Family Members are more likely to experience stress, anxiety and depression

Slide7

DoD and VA Data

Analyzed

data on 54,000 and 398,000 male OEF/OIF veterans-who accessed care- for PTSD risk

Considered

: Gender, age, rank, brand, component, marital status, race

Slide8

Women Using the VA

45,152

female OEF/OIF VA users

12

% total OEF/OIF VA users are women

Mirrors

the 11% of OEF/OIF women veterans eligible to use the VA

Slide9

Veterans: Women vs. Men

More African-American, 28.8

%

vs.

15%

Ratio

for Hispanic is

comparable, 11

%

Both

enlisted

rank higher

Younger, 29

years or less

Higher

ratio on Air Force, 17% vs. 11%

Lower

in marines, 3% vs. 14%

Slide10

Mental Health Diagnosis Reported Among OEF/OIF VeteransWomen vs. Men

PTSD: 19% vs. 23%

Non-Dependent Sub. Abuse: 13% vs.19%

Depressive Disorder: 20% vs. 15%

Affective Psychosis: 12% vs. 8%

Neurotic Disorder: 15% vs. 12%

Alcohol Dependence 2% vs. 4%

Drug Dependence: 1% vs. 2%

Personality Disorder: 2% vs. 1%

Slide11

PTSD and Women Veterans

Reserves

at greater risk than Active Duty

Enlisted

at greater risk than Officers

Army

at greater risk than other branches

Women

older than 30 at a greater risk

Slide12

Other PTSD Risk Factors

No

clear relationship to level of education

Divorced

or legally separated veterans at greater risk than married or single

No

significant difference by race

Slide13

Presentation and Diagnosis

Women

may have less exposure to combat or may be exposed to a different range of situations

Race

, ethnicity, age or rank difference and/or differences in early life trauma may account for differing rates of diagnosis

Women

may be more likely to receive diagnosis of personality disorder rather than PTSD

Slide14

Focus Group Conducted:Health Concerns

Disrupted

menstrual cycles

Exposure

to

prisoners

and animals

Sexual

harassment/assault

Combat-related

fear of death

Slide15

Post-deployment

Fertility

issues/miscarriages

Lack

of sexual interest

Overprotective

of their children

Slide16

Barriers to Care

Surrounded

by men

Guilt

Denial

Slide17

Military Culture

Distinct

culture with its own order, norms, chain of command, ethical codes and language

Rules

counterbalance the chaos of war ensuring missions are completed no matter how hard or uncertain

Group

bonding

Slide18

Boots on the Ground:

One Woman’s Point of View

LT Elizabeth Marks, USNR

Slide19

Women Enlist Over Time

Women

participated in large numbers in WWII

1993

Congress opened combat ships to women

1993-95

first female pilots placed in all branches

2005

first female awarded Silver Star in combat

2008

first female promoted to 4-Star General

Some

specialties are still restricted to women

Slide20

Military Culture and Women

Some people:

Believe

in the Boy’s Club or Rite of Passage

Consider

women’s physical and psychological characteristics incompatibility leads to lessening of standards

Believe

women are a distraction to the male warrior who wants to protect

Believe

in stereotyping female roles and jobs

Frustrated

by accommodating female presence in barracks

Slide21

Challenges

Aggressive

vs. emotional

Isolation

and lack of camaraderie

Socialization

with men

Competition

for recognition

Becoming one of the

guys”

Garnering

too much attention

Slide22

Sexual Stigmas

Sexual assault

Risk

working environment, reputation and promotions

Pregnancy

No-sex policy

Risk

being sent

home

Jeopardizing

a unit

Slide23

Issues

Single mothers

Pre-deployment

Deployment

Reintegration

Wanting to go back

Buying weapons

Getting into trouble

Adrenaline rush

Isolation

Anger

Slide24

Barriers to Mental Health Care

System

set up for men

Woman

seeking care for sexual trauma or PTSD in waiting room with men

Primary

and specialty care were not available until recently

Fragmentation

of Care

Stigmatization

of PTSD leading to abuse

Denial

Pride

Slide25

Mental Health Care Considerations

Women

typically decide who receives care in the family, putting herself last

If

it is paired with something they think is valuable for the family they are more likely to get the treatment

Support

groups can be helpful for developing social support, detrimental if a woman cannot stand being in a closed room or in groups

Integrate

short interventions with primary care such as cutting back on

drinking

Slide26

Mental Health Care Considerations

Smoking problems are much higher in veteran women than civilian women

Proportion of women prescribed NRT is lower for women

Encourage phone counseling or cessation treatment if they are concerned about weight management or mood changes

Veterans want more education but not all at once or right after they come home

Incorporate subsequent contact and Web-based information

Slide27

TRICARE

DoD

integrated health care delivery system

Provides

health care benefits/services to active duty, retired, families, survivors and their eligible beneficiaries

Combines

access to military hospitals and clinics with a network of civilian health care providers

Supports

readiness, ensures health of forces and cares for them when ill or injured

Slide28

TRICARE

Regions: North, South and West

Options: Prime, Standard, Extra and Reserve Select

Services: Pharmacy, Inpatient and Outpatient

Becoming a provider

Slide29

US Department of Veterans Affairs

Includes

the Veterans Health Administration and Veterans Benefits Administration

23.4

million veterans currently alive

25

% of US population is eligible for benefits

Each

veteran is eligible for 5 years upon returning

from each

deployment

Slide30

VA Seamless Transition Program Manager

Located

at each VA medical Center

Ensures

OEF/OIF veterans quickly find their way to the right VA services and benefits

Begins

with contacts at Post Deployment Health Assessments, walks veterans through the VA system

Direct

any veteran or family member seeking assistance in connecting with VA services

Slide31

Additional Information and Resources

Awareness Campaign Folder

Awareness Campaign Online Course

Awareness Campaign Handouts

Slide32

Paula McBride

Army OneSource

Community Support Coordinator

Oklahoma & Arkansas

405.471.7750

Paula.McBride@serco-na.com

Slide33

Slide34

Slide35


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