Student Development Theory

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Undergraduate Academic Advising Collaborative. September 2017. Why Theory Matters. Wait, does theory matter?. Yes! . Theories do not inform us about what exactly to do, but provide student affairs educators with a way to think about how to interpret individuals, environments, and organizations. . ID: 752554 Download Presentation

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Student Development Theory




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Presentations text content in Student Development Theory

Slide1

Student Development Theory

Undergraduate Academic Advising Collaborative

September 2017

Slide2

Why Theory Matters

Wait, does theory matter?

Yes!

Theories do not inform us about what exactly to do, but provide student affairs educators with a way to think about how to interpret individuals, environments, and organizations.

Abes

, E.S.,

Jones,

S.R. (2011). The Nature and Uses of Theory. In

College Student Development Theory: Ashe Reader Series

(2

nd

ed., pp. 3-16). Boston, MA: Pearson Learning Solutions.

Slide3

Types of Student Development Theory

Slide4

Types of Student Development Theory

Slide5

Continued Reading

Abes

, E. S., &

Kasch

, D. (2007). Using queer theory to explore lesbian college students' multiple dimensions of identity.

Journal of College Student Development

,

48

(6), 619-636.

Arnett

, J. J. (2000). Emerging adulthood: A theory of development from the late teens through the twenties.

American psychologist

,

55

(5), 469.

Astin

, A. W. (1984). Student involvement: A developmental theory for higher education.

Journal of college student personnel

,

25

(4), 297-308

.

Bennett, C. (2007). In practice‐Venturing into scary places: The minority experience.

About Campus

,

12

(2), 26-29.

Brayboy

,

B. M. (2004). Hiding in the ivy: American Indian students and visibility in elite educational settings.

Harvard Educational Review

,

74

(2), 125-152

.

Cullaty

, B. (2011). The role of parental involvement in the autonomy development of traditional-age college students.

Journal of college student development

,

52

(4), 425-439.

Koh

, C. (2012). Moral development and student motivation in moral education: A Singapore study.

Australian Journal of education

,

56

(1), 83-101.

Love, P. G., & Guthrie, V. L. (1999). Synthesis, assessment, and application.

New Directions for Student Services

,

1999

(88), 77-93

.

Patton, L. D., McEwen, M.,

Rendón

, L., & Howard‐Hamilton, M. F. (2007). Critical race perspectives on theory in student affairs.

New Directions for Student Services

,

2007

(120), 39-53

.

Renn

, K. A., & Arnold, K. D. (2003).

Reconceptualizing

research on college student peer culture.

The journal of higher education

,

74

(3), 261-291.

Torres, V., Jones, S. R., &

Renn

, K. A. (2009). Identity development theories in student affairs: Origins, current status, and new approaches.

Journal of College Student Development

,

50

(6), 577-596.

Torres, V., & Hernandez, E. (2007). The influence of ethnic identity on self-authorship: A longitudinal study of Latino/a college students.

Journal of College Student Development

,

48

(5), 558-573.

Yosso

,

T. J. (2005). Whose culture has capital? A critical race theory discussion of community cultural wealth.

Race ethnicity and education

,

8

(1), 69-91

.

Yosso

, T. J. (2006).

Critical race

counterstories

along the Chicana/Chicano educational pipeline

. Routledge.

Slide6

Chickering’s

Theory of Identity Development

Psychosocial Theory.

Seven

vectors of

development.

Chickering

(1969) labeled the seven

dimensions vectors "because each seems to have direction and magnitude-even though the direction may be expressed more appropriately by a spiral or by steps than a straight line

" (p

. 8). 

Slide7

Chickering’s

Theory of Identity Development

Vector 2:

Developing Autonomy

Vector 3:

Managing Emotions

Vector 5:

Establishing Identity

Vector 6:

Developing Purpose

Vector 7:

Developing Integrity

Vector 4:

Developing Mature Interpersonal Relationships

Vector 1:

Developing Competence

Time:

First Year

Sophomore

Junior

Senior

Beyond

Slide8

Chickering’s

Theory of Identity Development

Slide9

Chickering’s

Theory of Identity Development

Developing Mature Interpersonal Relationships

Tolerance and appreciation of differences

Capacity for intimacy

Establishing Identity

Developing Integrity

Involves three sequential and overlapping stages

Developing Purpose

Vocational plans and aspirations

Personal interests

Interpersonal and family commitments

Slide10

Schlossberg’s Transition Theory

Slide11

Schlossberg’s Transition Theory

Transition: “any event, or non-event, that results in changed relationships, routines, assumptions and roles”

Defined by the individual experiencing it

Adapted from

Goodman et al. 2006

Anticipated

Unanticipated

Nonevents

Personal

Ripple

Resultant

Delayed

Slide12

Schlossberg’s Transition Theory

Slide13

Applying Theory to Practice

How to Schlossberg your next student

Theories do not inform us about what exactly to do, but provide student affairs educators with a way to think about how to interpret individuals, environments, and organizations.

Abes

, E.S., Jones, S.R. (2011). The Nature and Uses of Theory. In

College Student Development Theory: Ashe Reader Series

(2

nd

ed., pp. 3-16). Boston, MA: Pearson Learning Solutions.

Slide14

Contrary to popular belief

Advisors

do not

have all the answers

Theories guide us toward potential and plausible interpretations

but these should never be viewed as

the

one way to understand what is going on.

Abes

, E.S., Jones, S.R. (2011). The Nature and Uses of Theory. In

College Student Development Theory: Ashe Reader Series

(2

nd

ed., pp. 3-16). Boston, MA: Pearson Learning Solutions.

Applying Theory to Practice

Slide15

Case Studies

What are possible issues that need to be addressed by the student?

What are goals that might apply to the student?

How does your group’s assigned theory (Schlossberg or

Chickering

) help you understand the student’s situation? How does it help in developing advising interventions or strategies with the student?

To what extent do diversity or multicultural issues need to be considered with the student? What are considerations related to this?

What are key considerations that would guide your advising with the student

?

Slide16

Share your thoughts


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