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Tour of the Milky Way

Vital Statistics. It’s our home!. Contains more than 200 billion stars, and a mass of ~10. 12. suns. It’s almost as old as the Universe itself!. 13.7 billion years old. Structure. The core and spiral arms are of different .

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Tour of the Milky Way






Presentation on theme: "Tour of the Milky Way"— Presentation transcript:

Slide1

Tour of the Milky WaySlide2

Vital Statistics

It’s our home!

Contains more than 200 billion stars, and a mass of ~10

12

suns

It’s almost as old as the Universe itself!

13.7 billion years oldSlide3

Structure

The core and spiral arms are of different

colors

. Why?Slide4

Us and the Milky Way

An artist impression of our motion through space

(start around 2:20 for the highlight)Slide5

Us and the Milky Way

We orbit around the Sun…

But the Sun also orbits our galaxy

The planets DO NOT orbit along the plane of the Milky Way

Because we are inside the Milky Way, we get a very different view compared to outsidersSlide6

A 360° view of the Milky Way

Objects near and far all blend into a single view. There is very little sense of perspective!Slide7

Tips to find yourself in space

Cardinal directions!

Are you near the plane of the MW?

Season?

Familiar Asterisms/Patterns (if any)

Bright stars and their plausible identitySlide8

Asterisms and Familiar Patterns

(Non-exhaustive)

Seasonal Markers: 3 Triangles and 1 Square

Winter Hexagon

The 4 Crosses

The Big/Little Dipper

The Teapot of Sagittarius

The Circlet of Pisces

The Keystone of Hercules

The W/M of Cassiopeia

The J of ScorpiusSlide9

Getting to the actual target:

Starhopping

Know your FOV!

Is your image upside down/ laterally inverted?

Identify prominent shapes/connections of bright stars on the path to the targetSlide10

Getting to the actual target:

Starhopping

Know your FOV!

Finder

8” SCTSlide11

Getting to the actual target:

Starhopping

Is your image upside down/ laterally inverted?Slide12

Getting to the actual target:

Starhopping

Identify prominent bright stars/patterns on the path to the targetSlide13

Navigating the Milky Way

For all four seasonsSlide14

SPRING: MARCH to

june

Our ViewSlide15

Spring: Mar - Jun

As we look down along the Centaurus Arm, many objects flood the zoneSlide16

Spring: Mar - Jun

From our perspective, the Milky Way plunges from

Canis

Major and deep into the Southern sky. Let’s zoom in…Slide17

Spring: Mar - Jun

Now, we are looking directly along the Centaurus Arm. You can see this by the many bright stars in this areaSlide18

Spring: Mar - Jun

If you are lost among the stars, never fear!

The Southern Cross is here!Slide19

Spring: Mar - Jun

However, be careful not to mix this up with the bigger False Cross…

Acrux

Beta

Crucis

Gacrux

Delta

CrucisSlide20

Spring: Mar - Jun

Notice that the Southern Cross has a 5

th

star, unlike the False Cross.Slide21

Spring: Mar - Jun

Another way is to remember that the Southern Cross is next to two bright stars, called the PointersSlide22

Spring: Mar - Jun

Not only do they “point” to Crux, the brighter star (Alpha Centauri) is the closest star system to the Sun.

Alpha CenSlide23

Spring: Mar - Jun

We can use the stars of the Cross to reach three bright objects.

Acrux

Beta

Crucis

Gacrux

Delta

CrucisSlide24

Spring: Mar - Jun

From Delta

Crucis

, extend a line past

Gacrux

into the stars of Centaurus to reach Omega Centauri

Gacrux

Delta

CrucisSlide25

Spring: Mar - Jun

Right next to Beta

Crucis

lies a wonderful gem called the Jewel Box

Beta

CrucisSlide26

Spring: Mar - Jun

From Beta

Crucis

, extend a line past the 5

th

star of the Cross to reach the Eta

Carinae

Nebula

Beta

CrucisSlide27

SUMMER: JULY TO OCTOBER

Our ViewSlide28

Summer: July-August

This is the heart of the Milky Way: there is much to see here! Slide29

Summer: July-August

Two prominent constellations/asterisms dominate the fieldSlide30

Summer: July-August

Directions to M8, the Lagoon NebulaSlide31

Summer: July-August

Directions to M7, the Ptolemy ClusterSlide32

Summer: July-August

Directions to C76, the False CometSlide33

Summer: Sep-Oct

Over months, our perspective shifts and other areas rise…Slide34

Summer: Sep-Oct

The Summer Triangle is made up of 3 prominent starsSlide35

Summer: Sep-Oct

Can you see a Northern Cross?Slide36

Summer: Sep-Oct

The Northern Cross connects the brightest stars in CygnusSlide37

Summer: Sep-Oct

Directions to Albireo, a

colorful

double starSlide38

Summer: Sep-Oct

From Cygnus, we can trace the start of the Great Rift

Made up of cold clouds of gas and dust, the Great Rift highlights the plane of the Milky WaySlide39

Summer: Sep-Oct

Trace out the constellation of Aquila the EagleSlide40

Summer: Sep-Oct

Altair, the brightest star in Aquila, marks its beakSlide41

Summer: Sep-Oct

Its “tail” helps us locate M11, the Wild Duck ClusterSlide42

Fall:

OCTober

TO

DEcember

Our ViewSlide43

Fall: Oct-Nov

As Summer ends, the Milky Way arcs to the Northern Sky.

As we are looking outwards, there are less objects to be seen.Slide44

Fall: Oct-Nov

Cygnus remains for a little while longer.

Can you see the Northern Cross?Slide45

Fall: Oct-Nov

Draw a line from the Northern Cross, and we’ll hit

the W of Cassiopeia. Lets zoom in!Slide46

Fall: Oct-Nov

A favorite fall object is the Double Cluster…Slide47

Fall: Oct-Nov

Can you also spot a special object in this image?Slide48

Fall: Oct-Nov

Cassiopeia points to the region around the Andromeda GalaxySlide49

Fall: Oct-Nov

The Great Square of Pegasus is an easier way of getting thereSlide50

Fall: Oct-Nov

The Great Square has a northern ‘leg’. That’s Andromeda!Slide51

Fall: Oct-Nov

From

Mirach

, draw a perpendicular line to get closer…Slide52

WINTER: December TO MARCH

Our ViewSlide53

Winter: Dec - Mar

From Cassiopeia and Perseus, the Milky Way plunges south

through GeminiSlide54

Winter: Dec - Mar

As we are looking away from the center of the galaxy, the Milky Way appears dimmest here.

Thankfully, the winter sky boasts of two famous objectsSlide55

Winter: Dec - Mar

But first: let us familiarise ourselves with some signpostsSlide56

Winter: Dec - Mar

With its belt of 3 bright stars, Orion is hard to missSlide57

Winter: Dec - Mar

Extend his belt to reach two bright starsSlide58

Winter: Dec - Mar

The orange star is Aldebaran, the eye of Taurus the BullSlide59

Winter: Dec - Mar

The other star is Sirius, the brightest star in the night skySlide60

Winter: Dec - Mar

Can you see an equilateral triangle containing Sirius?Slide61

Winter: Dec - Mar

The Winter Triangle connects Procyon to Betelgeuse and SiriusSlide62

Winter: Dec - Mar

We can also extend this into a misshapen Winter Hexagon…Slide63

Winter: Dec - Mar

As it connects 6 constellations at one go, this is a good way to navigate the winter night sky

Taurus

Orion

Canis

Major

Canis

Minor

Gemini

AurigaSlide64

Winter: Dec - Mar

But Orion is more than just a signpost. Lets zoom in…

Taurus

Orion

Canis

Major

Canis

Minor

Gemini

AurigaSlide65

Winter: Dec - Mar

Recap: where’s the belt of Orion?Slide66

Winter: Dec - Mar

Below Orion’s belt, we have a fuzzy “star”: the Orion NebulaSlide67

Winter: Dec - Mar

Next: locate Bellatrix

Bellatrix is on the same “side” of Orion as BetelgeuseSlide68

Winter: Dec - Mar

From Bellatrix, extend a line across Aldebaran.

You’ll reach the PleiadesSlide69

Winter: Dec - Mar

The Pleiades and Orion Nebula are both visible with the naked eye, even in Singapore!Slide70

A test!Slide71

What objects can you spot?