1 The Challenge High school completion is no longer sufficient for entry into a family-sustaining c

1 The Challenge High school completion is no longer sufficient for entry into a family-sustaining c 1 The Challenge High school completion is no longer sufficient for entry into a family-sustaining c - Start

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1 The Challenge High school completion is no longer sufficient for entry into a family-sustaining c




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Presentations text content in 1 The Challenge High school completion is no longer sufficient for entry into a family-sustaining c

Slide1

1

The Challenge

High school completion is no longer sufficient for entry into a family-sustaining career.

SOURCES: Bureau of Labor Statistics (BLS), Current Population Survey. Data are for persons age 25 and over. Earnings are for full-time wage and salary workers. *BLS, Employment Projections: 2015-2025 Summary.

Slide2

2

What is a best bet?

A college

or job

training program that:

Is compressed and leads to a credential (less than a bachelor's degree), often stackable

Is accessible to your students (or at least a subset of them)

Has strong retention (75%+) and completion (65%+ for certificate program;

55%+ for associate’s degree program)

rates

Has evidence of high job placement – at least 75% of program graduates are able to gain jobs in the industry . . . and that prepares students for an entry-level job that:Is grounded in student career interest and accessible to applicants with little or no industry experienceRequires less than a bachelor's degreeIs projected to grow and has openings in the regionHas a median wage that is at least 80% of the region’s median wageOffers career advancement potential

BEST BET

What is a Best Bet?

Slide3

Determine best bets

Review findings from the labor market, postsecondary programs, and employers against a set of best bet criteria

Even if a program is a best bet, it will not be the right fit for every student – consider what kind of students may or may not be well suited for each best bet

Investigate postsecondary programs

What programs are offered in in-demand fields, and who offers them?

Does the program enroll students like yours, and are they persisting?

What supports do students receive?

Are graduates employed in the field for which they trained?

Learn the labor market

What entry-level jobs are in demand and offer a good starting wage?

What are employers seeking?How can students get a foot in the door?IDENTIFYING BEST BETSStrengthen employer relationshipsWhat education/training, skills, and experiences are needed for ‘in demand’ jobs with regional employers?Which entry-level jobs offer the best career advancement opportunities?How can training program curricula better meet employer needs?There are several key steps to navigate on the path towards identifying best bet postsecondary programs in your region.

Slide4

Localized Labor Market Analysis

Postsecondary Program Analysis

Analysis of Employer Interviews

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Each profile:

Captures important occupational informationSummarizes what employers are looking for (requirements and preferences)

Provides an overview of an associated postsecondary program

Identifies career trajectory opportunities, including wage growth

Slide6

The Best Bets Process: Engaging with the Framework

Slide7

7

Education and/or Work Experience

Job Openings

Growth

Wages

Particularly the occupation’s

10

th

percentile wage in your metropolitan statistical area (MSA)

– often a good indicator of an entry-level wage for those with little or no industry experience

(or, sometimes between the 10th and 25th percentiles)Median wage in your MSA – often a helpful indicator of what one could earn after working in the occupation for several years – also a key benchmark to look at relative to the MSA’s median wage for all occupationsPercent change (also referred to as growth or growth rate) projected for your state over the most recent 10-year periodHigh growth doesn’t necessarily mean great opportunity, and low (or even negative) growth doesn’t necessarily mean poor opportunityJob openings projected for your state over the most recent 10-year periodSee if job openings are reported annually or in total over a 10-year period – that has significant implications about potential demandTypical education needed for entry (in U.S.)National % of workers in the occupation with a bachelor’s degree or higher – sometimes, in some regions, jobs that typically require an associate’s degree are − in reality − inaccessible without a bachelor’s and/or significant experienceTypical work experience needed

The LMI data important

for uncovering Best Bets

Slide8

While labor market data are helpful, they have limitations – employers and workforce development organizations can help to fill in the blanks.

8

Education, and/or Work Experience

Job Openings

Growth

Wages

For a given occupation, you should know:

Find out about benefits (e.g., health insurance, tuition remission, retirement plans, long-term disability insurance) – students need to know about the value of these incentives

Wage gains associated with career advancement

Growth does not always mean job opportunity, and projected declines may still yield high numbers of quality jobs

Occupations with projected declines may still have numerous job openings due to people leaving jobs for various reasons (replacement jobs)Contact employers and workforce development organizations to find out if occupations really have job openings in your regionThe level of education required for entry into a given occupation may differ by region and employerMajor economic events (e.g., a recession) can affect the education/training/work experience employers require/prefer when hiringHowever…VALIDATING THE DATA

Slide9

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BEST BET OCCUPATION

CRITERIA

What is a best bet occupation?

An entry-level occupation that:

Is grounded in student career interest and accessible to new/recent graduates with little or no industry experience

Requires less than a bachelor’s degree

Is projected to grow and has openings in the state

Has a median wage that is at least 80% of the

region’s

median wageOffers opportunities for advancementIMAGE SOURCE: © Blend Images / Fotolia

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10

THE

CHALLENGE

SOURCES: *Community College Research Center, Get With the Program: Accelerating Community College Students’ Entry into and Completion of Programs of Study

, 2012; **College Factual

For these reasons, students must understand programs of interest from a labor market, postsecondary, and employer perspective. Research suggests that it is critical for a student to enter a program of study as quickly as possible. Students who do not enter a program of study within a year of enrollment are far less likely to ever enter a program or complete a credential

.*Finding the right program from the start is also important because most students don’t understand the costs of changing majors in terms of time and money.

Each time a student changes a major, he/she loses

$45,000

on average, between lost tuition credits and lost wages from entering the workforce later than expected. In addition, he/she will also incur more student debt over time.**

Choosing a program of study as soon as possible upon entry is key to student success.

Slide11

GATHERING THE RIGHT INFORMATION ON PSE PROGRAMS

11

Using the Postsecondary Interview Protocol:

How much information can we get about a postsecondary

program online? Look up a local community college in your region

Find a one year technical program/certificate that is being offeredAnswer the questions on your postsecondary interview protocolFor Example

: Austin Community College – check out “quick careers” Community College of Vermont – check out Certified Production Technician

Slide12

Entering and Succeeding in the Program

Program Design and Structure

Alignment with Employers

Program Outcomes

Are there minimum scores

required on

entry-level tests?

Is there a

waitlist and,

if so, what can students do in the interim

?What supports exist to ensure that students are successful?What will students learn as a result of completing the program?What is the program’s instructional approach (e.g., hands-on learning vs. lecture-based)?What is the cost of the program? Median student debt upon finishing the program?What job(s) does the program prepare graduates for?How does the program involve employers (e.g., design, internships, etc.)?Can ex-offenders work in the occupation/field? What are rates of persistence and completion in the program?

What percentage of graduates get hired? Where do they typically go, and how much can they expect to earn?

GATHERING THE RIGHT

INFORMATION ON PSE PROGRAMS

12

Slide13

13

BEST

BET PROGRAM CRITERIA

What is a best bet postsecondary training program?

Since there is no best bet program for everyone, it's critical that you think about what kinds of students would be a good match for each one you identify.

BEST BET PROGRAM

A program that:

Is compressed and leads to a credential (less than a bachelor’s degree) that is often stackable

Is accessible to your students (or at least a subset of them)

Has strong retention and completion rates. Retention should be 75%+ from one semester/cycle to the next. Completion should be at least 65% for a certificate program and at least 55% for an associate’s degree program.

Has evidence of high job placement – at least 75% of program graduates are able to gain jobs in the industry

Slide14

A number of people and resources can help you identify and connect with employers.

14

GETTING EMPLOYERS ON BOARD

Postsecondary program coordinators and staff of non-credit workforce divisions (ask about employers who have hired program graduates, employers serving on college advisory committees, etc.)

Your local Workforce Investment Board, One-

Stop Career Center, and Chamber of Commerce

Labor market research – Identify employers tied to in-demand occupations (e.g., your state LMI office may have a ‘major employer’ database for your region).

Search

Career Infonet’s Employer Locator tool.Local news reporters who write about trends in the local economy, including growing and declining occupations/industries, employers who are hiring, etc.

Slide15

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VALIDATING BEST BET OCCUPATION

CRITERIA WITH EMPLOYERS

Think back to our

best bet occupation criteria. They help us to formulate key questions for employers:

Is the occupation really accessible to new/recent graduates with little or no industry experience?

Does it really require less than a bachelor’s degree?

Is it expected to grow and does it have openings in the state/region?

Does it pay a median wage that is close to the

region’s

median wage?Does it offer career advancement?IMAGE SOURCE: © Blend Images / Fotolia


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