Warning Response and Preparedness: Some Considerations for - PowerPoint Presentation

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William R Donner PhD Associate Professor Department of Sociology and Anthropology University of TexasRio Grande Valley Flood Warnings Two Perspectives Risk as instinctual Threats immediately perceived as such and responded to accordingly ID: 587541 Download Presentation

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Slide1

Warning Response and Preparedness: Some Considerations for Flood Safety in the Rio Grande Valley

William R. Donner, Ph.D.

Associate Professor

Department of Sociology and Anthropology

University of Texas-Rio Grande ValleySlide2

Flood Warnings: Two Perspectives

Risk as “instinctual”

Threats immediately perceived as such and responded to accordingly

Warnings simple

: Immediate reaction, immediate safety.

Risk as social process

Individuals

define

risk, whether they are at risk, and how to best respond to risk

Warnings highly complex

: Reactions shaped by past experience, social obligations and expectations, learned skepticism, need for certainty, sense that threat is personal, and belief that action is necessary and possible. Slide3

Warning Response Model

Upon public release,

f

lood alerts, watches, and warnings set into motion a well-understood and distinct process of warning response (

Mileti 2000)ReceptionUnderstandingBelief

ConfirmationPersonalizationResource allocation and evaluation

Response

Can apply to a wide range of risks, from flood warnings to water quality alerts.Slide4

How Does/Should This Affect Policy?

Psychological, social, and cultural differences shape the dynamics and character of warning response process.

Do we try to alter the behavior of groups who do not follow the process in an “ideal” manner?

Or, accommodate different response processes through policy, partnerships, and stakeholder awareness?Slide5

Case Study Example: Milford, TN Tornado Outbreak

2007 tornado outbreak in Midwest U.S.

Context: Milford, TN

Large Hispanic population

Limited infrastructure, technologyHispanics made use of informal social networksLanguage barriersCultural normsFear of authoritiesSlide6

Policy Consequences

Apply same policy across different populations?

Modify existing policies to accommodate unique needs?

Emergency training for informal community leaders

Warnings communicated in foreign languageShelters located at informal, non-governmental institutionsSlide7

Questions?

Shom More....