Political Parties, PACs, Lobbying, and Interest Groups Political Parties - Presentation

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Political Parties, PACs, Lobbying, and Interest Groups Political Parties

Political Parties, PACs, Lobbying, and Interest Groups Political Parties What are Political Parties? Organizations of people with similar ideas that are formed to win elections. What are PACs (Political Action Committees)?

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Political Parties, PACs, Lobbying, and Interest Groups Political Parties






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Political Parties, PACs, Lobbying, and Interest Groups

Political Parties

What are Political Parties? Organizations of people with similar ideas that are formed to win elections.

What are PACs (Political Action Committees)? Political Action Committees, commonly called "PACs," are organizations dedicated to raising and spending money to either elect or defeat political candidates.

Political Action Committees Most PACs are directly connected to specific corporations, labor groups, or recognized political parties.

Political Action Committees PACs solicit contributions from employees or members and make contributions in the PACs name to candidates or political parties.

Political Action Committees Non-connected or ideological PACs raise and spend money to elect candidates -- from any political party -- who support their ideals or agendas

Political Action Committees Under federal election laws, PACs can legally contribute only $5,000 to a candidate committee per election (primary, general or special). They can also give up to $15,000 annually to any national party committee, and $5,000 annually to any other PAC.

Top Ten PACs in Contributions to Federal Candidates 2014 1. National Association of Realtors Mixed 3.4 million National Beer Wholesalers Ass’n Mixed 3.1 million Honeywell International Rep. 2.7 million Operating Engineers Union Dem. 2.6 million Nat’l Auto Dealers Association Rep. 2.5 million Lockheed Martin Mixed 2.5 million American Bankers Association Rep. 2.5 million Credit Union National Association Mixed 2.4 million AT&T Rep. 2.4 million Northrup Grumman Rep. 2.4 million

Super PACs Super PACs came into existence in 2010 when federal court decisions found that limitations on both corporate and individual contributions is an unconstitutional violation of the 1 st Amendment. -- a PAC that is allowed to raise and spend unlimited amounts of money from corporations, unions, individuals and associations -- the most important difference between a PAC and a Super PAC is in who can contribute and in how much they can give -- candidates can accept up to 5K per election from a PAC; they cannot accept money from corporations, unions and associations -- for Super PACs there is no limit on who contributes or how much they can contribute but they cannot work in conjunction with the candidate they are supporting Clinton Super PAC ad https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=C0l3L35FIWM&feature=youtu.be

The Top Super PAC Spenders in 2012 (Millions) Republican Democrat

Who are Lobbyists? Someone who tries to persuade legislators to vote for bills that the lobbyists favor

Lobbyists A lobbyist is one who is professionally employed to lobby on behalf of clients or who advises clients on how to lobby on their own behalf.

Top Spenders on Lobbying Activities, 2013 1. U.S. Chamber of Commerce 74.4 million National Association of Realtors 38.6 million Blue Cross/Blue Shield 22.6 million Northrop Grumman 20.6 million National Cable & Telecommunications Ass’n 19.9 million American Hospital Association 19.7 million Comcast Corp 18.8 million American Medical Association 18.2 million Pharmaceutical Research and Manufacturers of America 17.9 million Top Spenders on Lobbying Activities, 2013

What Are Interest Groups? An interest group (special interests) is an organization of people with similar policy goals that try to influence the political process to try to achieve those goals. Interest groups try to influence every branch and every level of government .

The Roots and Development of American Interest Groups Washington warned against factions tearing the country apart. Madison wrote in Federalist 10 that they were bound to develop.

What Do Interest Groups Do? The most common and effective interest group technique is lobbying or seeking to influence and persuade others to support a group's position.

Perception of Interest Groups Is the government run by a few big interests looking out for themselves or is it run for the benefit of the people?

The More Things Change . . . . The More They Stay the Same.