Discourse Analysis M.Lucero

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and . M.Spyridakis. , . Spetses. , June 2017 . Discourse . is no longer or solely either the study of linguistic forms or the study of language use.. Discourse . is . rather viewed . as a social . practice referring either to spoken or to written contexts.. ID: 644104 Download Presentation

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Discourse Analysis M.Lucero




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Slide1

Discourse Analysis

M.Lucero

and

M.Spyridakis

,

Spetses

, June 2017

Slide2

Discourse

is no longer or solely either the study of linguistic forms or the study of language use.

Discourse

is

rather viewed

as a social

practice referring either to spoken or to written contexts.

M. Foucault, N.

Fairclough

Slide3

Discourse is characterised as:

produced/consumed/monitored by

agents, i.e., social

actors (producers/receivers of social practices);

shaped by social structures;

with social implications;

socially valued and regulated (production, reception and circulation).

Slide4

Hence, whereas in

traditional studies discourses were analysed in relation to social processes that form them, then recently researchers started talking about bidirectional and complex relations between discourses and social

practices.

For instance, the discourse about healthy food comes from social practices concerned with the meaning of having a certain lifestyle or even class position and vice versa.

Discourses of food Social Practice

“Healthy Food” Healthy lifestyle

Slide5

Discourse: “A specific series of representations and practices through which meanings are produced, identities constituted, social relations established, and political and ethical outcomes made more possible”

(Gregory et al. 2009, 166).

Slide6

Discourse Analysis

Formal Method vs. Critical Interpretative Approach

Primary concern: formal components & properties of linguistic representations vs. social practices made possible by language.

(Gregory et al. 2009, 167).

Slide7

Critical Discourse Analysis

All the above plus the search for ideological and cultural meanings as well as for power relations, latent or overt in the text or what is perceived as such.

Slide8

How to Do a Discourse Analysis

1) Establish the context

2) Explore the production process

3)

Code your

material

4) Examine

the structure of the

text

5)

Identify linguistic and rhetorical

mechanisms

6)

Interpret the

data

(this is a very general idea)

Slide9

What is Coding?

“Coding is analysis” (Miles &

Huberman

1994, 56).

Coding, “involves taking text data or pictures gathered during data collection, segmenting sentences (or paragraphs) or images into categories, and labeling those categories with a term…” (Creswell 2009, 186).

“It is important to note the different epistemology here from many quantitative projects. What is generally of interest is not so much the codes as the text they denote, not how often they occur but what is in them” (

Crang

1997, 188).

Slide10

Why code?

Minimize data overload

Some types of computer software can aid in content analysis

Useful in identifying themes and patterns

Can be used with many other methods

ethnography, interviews, surveys, discourse analysis, focus groups

Slide11

For coding it is necessary to establish our analytic unit.

This may be a word, a phrase, a paragraph or even a mixture of these depending on what we are looking for.

Remember:

Utterances do not only say things, they do things.

Slide12

Coding

is concerned with interpretation and representation of data. Post-structuralism is concerned with, “struggles over representation” (Johnston and

Sidaway

2004, 281).

Representations (be it a newspaper, photograph, or diary) are never neutral nor is the researcher neutral in analyzing the meaning of a text; representations are always tied up with power.

Slide13

Baker, Paul. 2006.

Using corpora in discourse analysis.

Continuum Discourse Series, ed. Ken Hyland. New York: Continuum

.

Creswell

, John W. 2009.

Research design: Qualitative, quantitative, and mixed methods approaches.

3

rd

ed. Thousand Oaks, CA: SAGE Publications

.

Miles

, Matthew B. and A. Michael

Huberman

. 1994.

An expanded sourcebook: Qualitative data analysis.

2

nd

ed. Thousand Oaks, CA: SAGE Publications.


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