Historical Thinking, Primary Sources, and Rigor in History
82K - views

Historical Thinking, Primary Sources, and Rigor in History

Similar presentations


Download Presentation

Historical Thinking, Primary Sources, and Rigor in History




Download Presentation - The PPT/PDF document "Historical Thinking, Primary Sources, an..." is the property of its rightful owner. Permission is granted to download and print the materials on this web site for personal, non-commercial use only, and to display it on your personal computer provided you do not modify the materials and that you retain all copyright notices contained in the materials. By downloading content from our website, you accept the terms of this agreement.



Presentation on theme: "Historical Thinking, Primary Sources, and Rigor in History"— Presentation transcript:

Slide1

Historical Thinking, Primary Sources, and Rigor in History Education

Mills Kelly

George Mason University

tkelly7@gmu.edu

Slide2

What Are We Going to Do Today?

Think about thinking like a historian

Watch some people think like a historian

Try to arrive at some partial agreement about what we think historical thinking is and how we can recognize it when we see it

Consider various primary sources and how students might work with them

Talk about rigor in history education

Slide3

Historical Thinking

Make a list for me of as many characteristics of historical thinking as you can think of in the next five minutes or so.

Slide4

Historical Thinking

Turn to the person sitting next to you

and share your list.

Slide5

Historical Thinking

Share one item on your list with me.

Slide6

Historical Thinking

I need a volunteer from the audience.

Slide7

Historical Thinking

The Little Big Horn Massacre

July 6, 1876

 

LATEST ACCOUNTS OF THE CHARGE. FORCE OF FOUR THOUSAND INDIANS IN POSITION ATTACKED BY LESS THAN FOUR HUNDRED TROOPS - OPINIONS OF LEADING ARMY OFFICERS OF THE DEED AND ITS CONSEQUENCES - FEELING IN THE COMMUNITY OVER THE DISASTER.

 

The dispatches giving an account of the slaughter of Gen. Custer's command, published in THE TIMES of yesterday, are confirmed and supplemented by official reports from Gen. A. H. Terry, commanding the expedition. On June 25 Gen. Custer's command came upon the main camp of Sitting Bull, and at once attacked it, charging the thickest part of it with five companies, Major Reno, with seven companies attacking on the other side. the soldiers were repulsed and a wholesale slaughter ensued. Gen. Custer, his brother, his nephew, and his brother-in-law were killed, and not one of his detachment escaped. The Indians surrounded Major Reno's command and held them in the hills during a whole day, but Gibbon's command came up and the Indians left. The number of killed is stated at 300 and the wounded at 31. Two hundred and seven men are said to have been buried in one place. The list of killed includes seventeen commissioned officers.

 

It is the opinion of Army officers in Chicago, Washington, and Philadelphia, including Gens. Sherman and Sheridan, that Gen. Custer was rashly imprudent to attack such a large number of Indians, Sitting Bull's force being 4,000 strong. Gen. Sherman thinks that the accounts of the disaster are exaggerated. The wounded soldiers are being conveyed to Fort Lincoln. Additional details are anxiously awaited throughout the country.

 

New York Times

Slide8

Historical Thinking

Slide9

Historical Thinking

Slide10

Historical Thinking

Slide11

Primary Sources: Images

Slide12

Primary Sources: Images

Slide13

Primary Sources: Images

Slide14

Primary Sources: Objects

Slide15

Rigor in the Digital World

Slide16

Rigor in the Digital World

Slide17

Rigor in the Digital World

Slide18

Rigor in the Digital World

Slide19

Slide20

Slide21

Slide22

Slide23

Slide24